Is Sony/Samsung anti-reflection filter good enough for a room with flat panel LED lighting?

awediophile

Standard Member
Hi all,

My lounge has bright, office-style LED panel lighting (to help with a visual impairment). My current (OLED) 55" is high on the wall and tilted downward to the viewing position so the ceiling lights are not in the angle of reflection.

I'm looking to change to a 75" (Sony XH95, X95J, or Samsung Neo Qled - probably the first of these three $$$) and the size alone will increase the likelihood of a reflection but more to the point I no longer want to tilt it, as the tilt would lead to a huge wall gap with that size screen (already not liking the gap for the 55). There will therefore be direct reflective 'line of sight' from viwing position to TV to ceiling lights. Can the anti-reflection handle this environment?

Thanks!
 

Raitziger

Member
Samsung might cause rainbow reflections if lights are coming from sides but is generally great head on. I would look into other features more for making the selection. Most LCDs are quite good in bright rooms.
 

Appelsap

Standard Member
Hi all,

My lounge has bright, office-style LED panel lighting (to help with a visual impairment). My current (OLED) 55" is high on the wall and tilted downward to the viewing position so the ceiling lights are not in the angle of reflection.

I'm looking to change to a 75" (Sony XH95, X95J, or Samsung Neo Qled - probably the first of these three $$$) and the size alone will increase the likelihood of a reflection but more to the point I no longer want to tilt it, as the tilt would lead to a huge wall gap with that size screen (already not liking the gap for the 55). There will therefore be direct reflective 'line of sight' from viwing position to TV to ceiling lights. Can the anti-reflection handle this environment?

Thanks!
OLED panels tend to have little to no anti-reflective coating on the screen. This not only disperses the light coming from outside the screen and being reflected, but it also disperses the light coming from the screen to some extent. The main issue with OLED (apart from possible burn-in risk) is that it's peak brightness is very limited. Hence every OLED TV has very limited anti-reflective measures.

LCD's don't suffer this fate and have far better brightness. The problem there is that some LCD techniques have limited viewing angles, where anti-reflective coating can actually help! If you have a bright room, windows next to or opposite the TV or lights on that may be reflected, the X95J will help and so will the QN90A's and alike. I currently have a similer older Samsung, and it does a decent job, looking into one of these TV's as well.

Do note that light shining directly on the screen will still be reflected. To give you an idea of the anti-reflection on the newer Sony's, a video has just been posted. That was shot in a store, with lots of TL or LED light strips in the ceiling.:

 

desinho

Member
OLED panels tend to have little to no anti-reflective coating on the screen. This not only disperses the light coming from outside the screen and being reflected, but it also disperses the light coming from the screen to some extent. The main issue with OLED (apart from possible burn-in risk) is that it's peak brightness is very limited. Hence every OLED TV has very limited anti-reflective measures.

LCD's don't suffer this fate and have far better brightness. The problem there is that some LCD techniques have limited viewing angles, where anti-reflective coating can actually help! If you have a bright room, windows next to or opposite the TV or lights on that may be reflected, the X95J will help and so will the QN90A's and alike. I currently have a similer older Samsung, and it does a decent job, looking into one of these TV's as well.

Do note that light shining directly on the screen will still be reflected. To give you an idea of the anti-reflection on the newer Sony's, a video has just been posted. That was shot in a store, with lots of TL or LED light strips in the ceiling.:


This only applies to the X95J with the new 'X-Anti Reflection' feature (though that scores lower on Rtings than what was on the XH95 so in that regard you could say it applies to the X-Wide Angle models; which are (some of) the newer Sony models) ... , the video is also useless as it's only showing bright content and has no comparison to another tv ;)
(redirected from this latest topic Understanding the difference between glare and reflections !)
 
Last edited:

dcweather

Standard Member
Indeed, I was about to say this "Hence every OLED TV has very limited anti-reflective measures" tends to contradict much of our recent research on the above mentioned thread, although some it is a bit contradictory and confusing anyway.
 

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