Is my ceiling negatively affecting my up-firing Atmos speakers?

CraftyClown

Active Member
Hi folks,

I've just moved and am in the process of re-setting up my 5.1.2 system. I have used YPAO on my Yamaha amp to configure everything and everything sounds great... apart from my Atmos speakers. I've tested a few movies and run some Atmos/DTS-X demos to test and the sound just doesn't sound like it's coming from above compared to my previous location.

The current ceilings are about 10 feet high as opposed to the last flat which was more like 8 feet, but I'm wondering about a 1 foot dip in the ceiling just above the listening spot. Other than the height difference and the ceiling dip everything else is the same, but it certainly doesn't sound it.

The up-firers are PSB Imagine XAs

Any thoughts on what the issue might be?

Cheers

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Jester1066

Well-known Member
Can you post screen shots of what decibel and distance level & crossovers that YPAO has measured your speakers at?

This will help determine if it's a room or calibration issue.
 

CraftyClown

Active Member
Yes of course.

I manually set the crossovers for all speakers to 80Hz apart from the Atmos which I set to 120Hz and also boosted the Atmos speakers by 2dB

Cheers

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Jester1066

Well-known Member

Gasp3621

Distinguished Member
Yes, they're set to Dolby Enabled SP

That high ceiling isn`t ideal for those upfiring speakers what i have heard from professional installers. Now in- or on-ceiling speakers would be spot on there, but for most people not possible. I assume the ceiling is made of similar material so flat, reflective etc. Can you play some atmos scene which you know has lot of stuff happening high, then move yourself closer or perhaps play with the angle of those speakers by putting something under them. Find if the sweet spot is somewhere else than where you sitting now. Can`t think much of anything else..
 

Gasp3621

Distinguished Member
I thought 10 feet was pretty sweet, height wise. Is that only for in-ceiling and not up-firers?

That`s what i heard that the higher ceiling is better for in-ceiling speakers for not localizing too easily and the upfiring type modules work better with lower ceiling.

If nothing helps perhaps you could talk wife about buying white height channels high up on front wall below ceiling and hiding wires with d-lite trunking. It´s pain in the butt and will cost too, but if you just can´t get them to work. At least try out do you hear the effects more clearly some other spot vs. your couch.
 

Jester1066

Well-known Member
I did, it's the second screenshot

Here it is again, just in caseView attachment 1532337
Opps my bad apologies. Strange how YPAO measured them upfiring speakers as 15ft - unless that's from the mic position rather than floor to ceiling 🤷‍♂️ I have thought it would be less given your ceiling height is only 10ft.

That high ceiling isn`t ideal for those upfiring speakers what i have heard from professional installers.

I thought 10 feet was pretty sweet, height wise. Is that only for in-ceiling and not up-firers?
This is taken from the Dolby Atmos Guidelines:

**Combination: Overhead and Dolby Atmos enabled speakers
For optimal performance, the ceiling should be flat (not angled or vaulted), with a height between 7.5 and 14 feet (2.3 to 4.3 meters), and made of an acoustically reflective material (drywall, plaster, hardwood, or another rigid, non---sound-absorbing material).**
 

CraftyClown

Active Member
Opps my bad apologies. Strange how YPAO measured them upfiring speakers as 15ft - unless that's from the mic position rather than floor to ceiling 🤷‍♂️ I have thought it would be less given your ceiling height is only 10ft.




This is taken from the Dolby Atmos Guidelines:

**Combination: Overhead and Dolby Atmos enabled speakers
For optimal performance, the ceiling should be flat (not angled or vaulted), with a height between 7.5 and 14 feet (2.3 to 4.3 meters), and made of an acoustically reflective material (drywall, plaster, hardwood, or another rigid, non---sound-absorbing material).**

As far as I know all the measurements are to mic position, which would make 15ft pretty accurate
 

Gasp3621

Distinguished Member
Opps my bad apologies. Strange how YPAO measured them upfiring speakers as 15ft - unless that's from the mic position rather than floor to ceiling 🤷‍♂️ I have thought it would be less given your ceiling height is only 10ft.




This is taken from the Dolby Atmos Guidelines:

**Combination: Overhead and Dolby Atmos enabled speakers
For optimal performance, the ceiling should be flat (not angled or vaulted), with a height between 7.5 and 14 feet (2.3 to 4.3 meters), and made of an acoustically reflective material (drywall, plaster, hardwood, or another rigid, non---sound-absorbing material).**
Yeah up to 4,3meters, but i trust the installers who hear these different type of systems daily and what works best.. :)
 

Jester1066

Well-known Member
But neither of you think that ledge just above the listening position could be the problem?
Nope. Not me. I would consider angling/ raising the PSB's up further then recalibration to see if this improves the sound.
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
I don't think so. Setup looks fine. Upfiring atmos is just a lot more subtle. If you can go to direct overheads at some point, go for it. Otherwise relax and enjoy.

Your expectations for upfiring speakers might just be too high. Its more of an ambient feeling.

at the end of the day, the speaker is infront of you and therefore the sound is coming from there.
 

CraftyClown

Active Member
I don't think so. Setup looks fine. Upfiring atmos is just a lot more subtle. If you can go to direct overheads at some point, go for it. Otherwise relax and enjoy.

Your expectations for upfiring speakers might just be too high. Its more of an ambient feeling.

at the end of the day, the speaker is infront of you and therefore the sound is coming from there.

Yeah, I totally understand the effect is subtle with up-firers, but the issue is it feels far more subdued than it was in my previous accommodation with exactly the same kit. I just couldn't work out what has caused the change
 

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