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is my amp powered correctly for my speakers

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by jpw94, Mar 30, 2003.

  1. jpw94

    jpw94
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    i am in the process of introducing new speakers. the ones i have chosen are Jamo 10.5k3

    They are rated as 100W nominal power 200W max power.

    My amp (denon avr-3300 is rated at 5x105W.) will this be enough power for these speakers?
     
  2. SystemBlack

    SystemBlack
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    I would think that the speakers would be well driven by your amp.
    If your speakers can take a 200w max power, then they shouldn't be bothered by 105w for short periods of time. I am sure your ears would give out long before the speakers. For your info though, I think the nominal rating is usually the power the speakers can take as a long term input (ie normally driven) and max shouldn't be exceeded more than intermittently.
    I have a pair of Realistic Optimus 400's rated at 100W max and they seem to be able to handle my yammy quite ok, especially now I have a sub attached.
    Hope this helps
     
  3. jpw94

    jpw94
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    that's good news! i was worried the amp would be under-powered.
     
  4. Steve.EX

    Steve.EX
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    JPW24
    There are many many posts that will cover this sort of thing (try a search!)

    Anyway as a general rule of thumb do not give speaker ratings by wattage to much importance.
    Be aware of impedance,sensitivity AND rated output watts (rms or continuous if given)
    If your speaker package has an impedance of 4ohms nominal then your Denon is unlikely you drive them to serious volume levels, also check that the sensitivity is nice and high 89b/w/m is average 'ish'.
    For something like your Denon ideally an 8 ohm speaker package with sensitivity of between 88-90db/w/m would be required to reach loudish volumes without problem.


    Steve.
     
  5. jpw94

    jpw94
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    Thanks for that info.
    I believe my Denon is 8ohms and the speakers are selectable.
    The sensitivity of these speakers is 92db. Is more better?
    I feel dumb!
     
  6. Steve.EX

    Steve.EX
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    JPW94

    To clarify.
    Your Denon will NOT be 8 (or anything) ohms, if there is a label on the back it will indicate/recommend a minimum impedance rating for the SPEAKERS to be used with it, typically the label will read something like: Speakers A minimum impeadance 4 (or whatever) ohms.
    It will be your/the speakers that carry the impedance rating (which refers to the electrical load placed on the amplifier, and by simple ohms law you will deduce that the lower the impedance the more current the amp will be required to develope/deliver)
    Sensitivity is another speaker related term that indicates what the measured output (in decibels) is at a distance of 1 meter per 1 watt of energy from an amp (this is at a uniform test frequency)
    So the higher the sensitivity of a speaker the louder it will be for a given output (be it 1, 10, 100watts)
    Speaker designs at the lower end of the market are generally designed with both a high impedance and highish sensitivity as an essential criteria as it is presumed that they will be placed upon lesser able (in current delivery terms) amplifiers.
    Agian generally speaking the higher up the speaker chain you go the less fundamental importance is placed upon impedance/sensitivity within speaker design as clearly you are unlikely to place a 2000gbp pair of speakers on a 200gbp Yamaha amp.
    Similarly, generally speaking the more you spend on an amp the better low impedance driving abilities it will have.
    92db/w/m sensitivity is nice and high, matched with an 8 ohm impedance, this is just the sort of load any budget type amp would very much like to see.

    Steve
     
  7. sounddog

    sounddog
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    Also worth noting is generally a speaker is a lot more likely to be damaged by an amp which is underpowered, and so is being driven very hard for the volume required as this is when clipping occurs (the top of the sine wave being cut off as the amp runs out of power).

    Vikki
     
  8. jpw94

    jpw94
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    So, what are you suggesting? if the "nominal" power is 100W and my amp provides 105w per channel is this "underpowered" and potentially a problem?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  9. sounddog

    sounddog
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    It was just a general comment ... also you need to remember that the actual wpc output of your 3802 is unlikely in the real world to be anywhere approaching the specified 105watts.

    Having said that ... unless you are listening at ludicrous levels, most amps will drive most speakers without damage.

    Vikki
     
  10. uncle eric

    uncle eric
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    Your Denon 3300's realistic firewall (a measurement of usable power before significant distortion enters proceedings) power output is approx 70-80 watts per channel all channels driven.
     

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