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Is HDMI and HDTV the same thing??

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by SuperSaiyan4, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. SuperSaiyan4

    SuperSaiyan4
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    I am confused...looking to get a HDTV plasma screen but decided to look at LCD screens instead however they dont say they are HDTV but HDMI is this the same thing?

    I am planning on getting an Xbox360 and want a HDTV tele although I have been advised to get an LCD instead, which one to go for plasma or LCD?

    Also looking to spend say around upto £1k
     
  2. ianh64

    ianh64
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    No they are not the same thing.

    HDTV is high definition TV, typically 720p (1280x720 progressive scan - 50 frames per second) or 1080i (1920x1080 interlaced 25 frames/50 fields per second).

    HDMI is a digital interface standard that may or may not carry HDTV standard resolutions or refresh rates. So just because something has an HDMI interface, it does not necessarily mean that it is capable of supporting all or some HDTV formats.

    -Ian
     
  3. Welwynnick

    Welwynnick
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    Some definitions, so you don't try to compare apples with achne:

    HDTV is high definition television, which has at least 720 lines, and upt o 1080 lines (instead of 576 lines for PAL currently)

    HDMI is high definition multimedia interface ("the new scart"). It is the new AV-industry-standard digital interface for connecting video sources and displays. It carries uncompressed high definition digital video signals, and can carry multi channel audio, too. HDMI is backwards compatible with DVI, the computer-industry-standard digital video only interface.

    HDCP you also need to know about, is high definition content protection. This is an encryption system which MAY be used with HDMI & DVI to protect copyright and stop copying. Programme makers and film studios are expected to require that high definition broadcasts and video discs use HDCP to stop people ripping them off.

    If you want hi def TV, it must have at least 720 lines, be able to take video over DVI or HDMI, and both the source (STB or HD-DVD or bluray) AND the display must support HDCP. In that case, you will be HD Ready.

    Most existing screens are not, but many newer ones are. If a screen has 480 lines, or no DVI/HDMI, or no HDCP, it will not be HD Ready.

    LCD is a screen technology that competes directly with plasma. You can get higher resolutions in small screens, but otherwise they have the poorest vlue for money and picture quality. LCD owners will of course argue.

    Plasma is the most popular large screen panel technology. It is better than LCD but still surprisingly poorer (and more expensive) than CRT.

    Beware anyone that tries to sell you a screen that is said to be high definition compatible, or anyone that says LCD is best.

    Trust the opinions of people on the forum with a four digit rating.

    How big ascreen do you want?

    regards, Nick
     
  4. SuperSaiyan4

    SuperSaiyan4
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    Hi guys thanks for the heads up, am looking to spend around £1k but I guess I cant get any HDTV for that which is a good brand say like Sharp, Samsung, Sony (lol the three 'S' makes :p) or other major brand, size wise looking at around 37inch to 42inch.

    Thanks I will stay away from LCD! Although is it still true then that plasma has a shelf live of 3 years? as the gas runs out or something?
     
  5. Stephen Neal

    Stephen Neal
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    Not sure what the lives quoted are these days - but plasmas certainly used to get dimmer with age.

    Then again LCD panels have backlights that have a similar ageing issue - and can require replacement - and DLP and LCD front/rear projectors obviously have issues with bulb life.
     
  6. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    Samsung are about to release a new 46" DLP rptv (SP46L6HX) over the next couple of weeks which is fully "HD Ready" and already Makro have advertised a special offer price of £999 excl VAT.
     
  7. SuperSaiyan4

    SuperSaiyan4
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    ex vat emm so i guess should be around £1200 or so thats pretty good! I am gonna wait till the end of the year by that price xbox360 will be out and the plasma HDTV's will come down in price.
     
  8. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
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    That was a rumour started by salemen in the US, so that people would buy extended warranties. The life of a plasma TV is between 30,000 and 60,000 hours, which is 10 to 20 years at 8 hours a day. During that time the light output will diminish, but the screens are pretty bright to start with.

    On the HDTV issue, I don't want to sound rude, but if your budget is tight, it's unlikely that you will be able to afford HDTV material to watch for quite some time either :)
     
  9. Dr Phibes

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    If you want to use it with the Xbox 360 then Plasma may not be your best choice due to issues with screen burn.
    I personally have a DLP set and they seem to offer the best screen size/picture quality to price ratio around but as mentioned earlier you do have to factor in the price of replacement bulbs.

    Best to get yourself out and do some comp. shopping.
    Good Luck.
     
  10. pjskel

    pjskel
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    As much as welwynnick did a good job of educating you on the intricies of HDTV and the connectors to get the signal into the TV, he is well, plain wrong to disuade you from LCD in favour of Plasma.
    Most of the "affordable" Plasmas are nowhere near HD resolution, whereas the majority of LCDs are.
    Screen burn is not really an issue these days as the broadcasters tend to shimmy the network logo by a few pixels so it's never fully stationary. If you get screen burn, it can be reduced to an almost negligible level, so again, not a major reason to decide not to buy a particular type of display.
    As for LCD - I don't know where he gets his comments from, but if anything, LCD is more affordable to the masses with HD capabilities by de facto, whereas Plasmam tends to be on the upper level of affordablility.
    If I didn't know any better, I'd say he was advocating CRT as the only thing worth bothering with still - sorry, but that dinosaur is nearing extinction, not least because the demand is for large scale TVs and CRT (and RPTV - rear projection) don't cut it with the consumer and the retailers anymore. Flat TVs are sexier, takeup less room, and are the future - something most people looking for a new TV are more likely to be influenced by rather than the bulky CRT that gets stuffed in the corner to make room for the rest of the furniture.

    Bottom line, use the advice here to clue yourself up on stuff, but don't take EVERYTHING you read as the gospel - if a nice LCD Tv for £800-1200 takes your fancy, and does what you need it to, then go with it. The current state of play for Plasma and new LCDs in the next 2-3 months is MORE than adequate to watch TV on, and to enjoy movies via DVDs owned or rented. Whatever you buy, from whereever, make sure the store has a policy that if not satisfied within 7 days or so, that you can return it - the chain stores feeds are notoriously bad, so it's hard to make an informed decision without testing it at home.
    A good AV dealer will definitely provide you with a good in-house demo, and more likely be happy to arrange a home demo if their broadcast feed isn't up to scratch, which it should be.
    Just don't rush the decision - perchase in haste, repent at leisure, as the saying goes.
     
  11. Stephen Neal

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    Yep - much of what you say is the case. However just because CRTs are being phased out because they are "dinosaur" technologies it doesn't mean they don't outperform LCDs and Plasmas in picture quality terms - even though plasmas outperform them in display size, and LCDs and Plasmas both have the size edge...

    Bottom line - Plasmas give the larger picture, LCDs usually win over plasmas in resolution terms (and possibly also beat CRTs). Both Plasmas and LCDs beat CRT in thickness and bulk - but CRTs still have the edge in dynamic range, black levels, greyscale and fidelity. (You don't see many broadcasters using LCDs or Plasmas for their quality picture monitoring...)
     
  12. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    I think he was referring to large screens and in this case plasma has the edge over LCD in terms of value for money. After all there aren't many decent 42" LCDs out there for less than £4K.
     
  13. 2towers

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    I have both a 42" plasma (early model of some 852x480) & a newer 32" LCD TV (1366*768). To me, plasma is better in the picture quality when watching DVDs with component input and gives vivid colours with higher contrast & bigger brightness. Whereas LCD is a bit inferior in these fields plus blurr surroundings around fast moving objects esp in the distant, but changes to give astonding picture details if work with a DVD player with a scaler chip inside which outputs 720p signals via a HDMI cable.

    The plasma generates much heat and now, 13 months from buying, has a faulty colouring verticle line of the breadth of several pixels appeared near the side of screen which cut across the whole panel vertically. On the contrary, LCD gives much less amount of heat. One thing to mention is that my wife used to watch TV on the palsma for long hours, usu 10-12 hours a day.

    As for watching non-HD TV signals, both are inferior to CRT TV and worse for the LCD due to a higher resolution which exposed the low resolution drawbacks of low-den TV signals. I regret that I don't have the opportunity to try on HD TV signals.

    What I got the impression is, although newer plasma TVs are announced to have longer lifetime, some 60,000 hrs, its design makes it more prone to failure esp in the panel, and should that happen serious repair in the panel is unavoidable. On the contrary, LCD's design makes it more easier to repair (replacing the backlight) should it be necessary.

    So, if you can afford, get the LCD. If not, get a palsma but grasp the longest warranty as much as possible and when get it home make sure to allow some time of 'rest' for it after hours of watching.
     
  14. Welwynnick

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    Lots of points here, and I hope that all this advice is beneficial and sensibly directed, rather than just being argumentative. Whenever anyone knocks a particular display technology, there is ALWAYS someone who will reply to defend it (because that is their chosen poison), so that is quite what I expected, and I actually toned down my original impulsive drafted comments to try to avoid offending people. I have a CRT TV, a plasma and have just bought an LCD, (and none have the best picture quality achievable), so I have no axes to grind or prejudices to spread.

    However, no-one will deny that the reason why people buy flat panel TVs is NOT picture quality, but the reasons can still be quite valid. I think maybe we should stop to ask what the original question was. Because it revolved around HDTV, I assumed, as I suppose I always do, that the priority was picture quality, but that might not be the case.

    If the need is to have an HDTV for £1000, then the best solution may indeed be a DLP rear projection set. The debate about the relative merits of the different types of displays is interminable, and probably never reaches any conclusion in any of the forums.

    One thing I would like to add, though, that flat panel display technology is still advancing. It has come a long way, and still has some way to go. CRTs still give the best picture quality. Period. No-one disputes that, but the gap is not as wide as it was. If it is an HDTV that you want, now may not be the time to get one. There will many more options to chose fom next year once the broadcast and distributed material becomes available, and I'm sure all the display and processing technology will continue to improve.

    Finally, I would warn against being swayed by what you see in shops. There are many different ways of connecting and configuring TVs, and it is very difficult to get a fair comparison. You are likely to find displays connected by composite, component, RGB, DVI or VGA all within the same shop, and that may have more bearing on picture quality than the products themselves. And if one screen looks brighter or more colourful than another, well, we all know the explanation for that - the vendor gets more commission.

    If that makes it more difficult to work out what is best, then I don't have a very good solution. Magazines may be more impartial, but have you noticed they never rate anything lower than 3 out of five for fear of losing advertising revenue? As I said in the beginning, the best opinions you can trust are forum mebers with four figure posting ratings (or Stephen Neal, who knows much more than he lets on)

    Best regards, Nick
     

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