Is buying Blurays/DVD's still worth it if you want to own a movie?

wilson85uk

Novice Member
I bought my first Bluray player this year, it's a Panasonic DP-UB450, so 4k UHD, the Bluray format came out in officially in 2008 after the format war with HD-DVD ended buts over a decade on I have only just done an overall upgrade of my existing dvd library, I'm not a collector, I simply only bought titles I wanted to own on DVD and prior to DVD, I had many of the same titles on VHS recorded off the TV. It's mostly just format shifting/upgrading for better quality, VHS, then DVD then Bluray.

Samsung quit the Bluray/DVD player market so surely that's going to push Sony, LG and Panasonic the other main 3 companies to follow suit. I use streaming services like Netflix, Prime etc but like with Sky movies on cable or satellite packages, you view the content, you don't own it, Netflix same, on demand to stream but not own.

I personally don't want to buy movies which aren't in my secure possession like with physical media, google movies, amazon etc they could easily be removed at anytime due to disputes with copyright holders etc, being cloud based in my eyes you don't own them, you just pay a fee to always stream them as long as their there.

I just hope people out there will keep physical media ownership to a fair demand, obviously it'll disappear one day and without a doubt their won't be a 4K bluray successor.
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
Yes, the writing is on the wall for media. Difficult to tell how long players will be around for. Five years, tops, perhaps.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Yes, the writing is on the wall for media. Difficult to tell how long players will be around for. Five years, tops, perhaps.
I remember that being said of CDs with the growth of streaming services, plenty of CD and SACD players on the market. Unlike music video needs far more bandwidth and in the UK the coverage of high speed broadband in years behind and in many cases people can't stream in SD, let alone HD or UHD.

Ten years ago my friends that live in the Brecon Beacons were promised broadband, yet still they can't muster more than 1mb. Physical discs will still be here for this decade if not beyond.
 

stasis

Active Member
I am not buying as many movies as I used to but I will continue to buy movies I consider to be worth owning.
I am price sensitive and find it hard to justify the price premium demanded for 4K.
This is preventing me from buying more than I do.
I tend to think £10 is a reasonable price for me to readily buy Blu-ray without considering the cost to much.
For me to spend £20 on a 4K disc it has to be a top film.
I am more likely to buy 4K disc at £15 or less.
I think a good Blu-ray music disc with a Cd included is a more worthwhile buy.
I just can’t see younger generations having the money or desire to pay £25 for a 4K movie.
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
The telling factor will be if the likes of Sony or Panasonic release new players, which I doubt. Demand is still there, but at what levels? Samsung dropped-out of player manufacture, as has Arcam and Oppo. Sales of DVD and BR discs are in the slide, so at some point, they’ll stop being produced. That said, vinyl has made a big comeback, so who really knows? I think that we’re on borrowed time though. Sony, Panasonic and LG can claim to offer complete solutions at present — TV, soundbar, player etc., but a lack of player in Samsung’s range hasn’t seemed to hurt their sales.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
but a lack of player in Samsung’s range hasn’t seemed to hurt their sales.
Not surprised, their players were crap. Oppo pulled out of audio/video as a corporate business decision, nothing at all to do with the demise or possible demise of the sector. Covid has skewed the look of the player market with no Pioneers now available. They are still advertised on the company's website with all showing 'currently not available'.

Physical media is still far far better than any streaming service and manufacturers will still see this as a market worth investing in as there will always be customers that want the very best in video and audio reproduction.

The main problem at the moment is that UHD discs are far too expensive and I've no doubt those prices will fall. I have actually got DVDs that were £25 when they first came out bought from Woolworths.
 

Jessica Noir

Well-known Member
I really hope someone picks up the manufacturing of decent quality players and I'm still kicking myself for not buying a Cambridge Audio UHD player last year. Saying that, the only blu-rays I buy now are from boutique labels like Criterion, Indicator, Vinegar Syndrome, BFI and Arrow. Having only bought a couple of 4K discs, streaming 4K from iTunes is just a hell of a lot easier and cheaper. I know the quality isn't as good, but for the savings and shelf space make up for it.
 

goingoingong

Distinguished Member
Not surprised, their players were crap. Oppo pulled out of audio/video as a corporate business decision, nothing at all to do with the demise or possible demise of the sector. Covid has skewed the look of the player market with no Pioneers now available. They are still advertised on the company's website with all showing 'currently not available'.

Physical media is still far far better than any streaming service and manufacturers will still see this as a market worth investing in as there will always be customers that want the very best in video and audio reproduction.

The main problem at the moment is that UHD discs are far too expensive and I've no doubt those prices will fall. I have actually got DVDs that were £25 when they first came out bought from Woolworths.
How can you say that with a straight face when 3 for £30, 3 for £36, 2 for £30 and 2 for £25 deals always seem to be running. And the Star Wars UHDs going so quickly down to £12 in the 3 for £36 deal was unexpected. What all of that may be showing though is poor sales at full price as many people are waiting for the titles they want to come into the deals.
 

simonblue

Distinguished Member
Not surprised, their players were crap. Oppo pulled out of audio/video as a corporate business decision, nothing at all to do with the demise or possible demise of the sector. Covid has skewed the look of the player market with no Pioneers now available. They are still advertised on the company's website with all showing 'currently not available'.

Physical media is still far far better than any streaming service and manufacturers will still see this as a market worth investing in as there will always be customers that want the very best in video and audio reproduction.

The main problem at the moment is that UHD discs are far too expensive and I've no doubt those prices will fall. I have actually got DVDs that were £25 when they first came out bought from Woolworths.

I know the reason Oppo dropped out,and as you say had nothing to do with,blu ray/UHD sales,i also agree prices of UHD will fall,i think a lot forget how much VHS/LD/DVD/Blu rays were when they first came out.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
How can you say that with a straight face when 3 for £30, 3 for £36, 2 for £30 and 2 for £25 deals always seem to be running. And the Star Wars UHDs going so quickly down to £12 in the 3 for £36 deal was unexpected. What all of that may be showing though is poor sales at full price as many people are waiting for the titles they want to come into the deals.
Because most of those will be UHD releases of blu rays. How many people really want to double or sometimes triple dip. I certainly don't want to and my combination of player and display does a fine job of showing good 1080 blu rays.

New titles are expensive. Yes they eventually come down yet most are supplied with a blu ray disc as well. If the studios want to save money then drop the blu rays because if people buy UHDs they already have a player.
 

goingoingong

Distinguished Member
Because most of those will be UHD releases of blu rays. How many people really want to double or sometimes triple dip. I certainly don't want to and my combination of player and display does a fine job of showing good 1080 blu rays.

New titles are expensive. Yes they eventually come down yet most are supplied with a blu ray disc as well. If the studios want to save money then drop the blu rays because if people buy UHDs they already have a player.
I'm guessing quite a few didn't mind double, triple or quadruple dipping for Star Wars (I've got VHS, DVD, blu-ray and now UHD box sets) . As to the mostly UHD releases of blu-rays I'm guessing you meant to say existing catalog blu-rays. Yet even there you are missing new releases like 1917, Joker, Birds of Prey, Onwards, etc which are in the deals.

Blu-rays are there to keep what may be substantial extras on them, leaving more disc space on the UHDs allowing for less compression to be used.
 
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gibbsy

Moderator
I'm guessing quite a few didn't mind double, triple or quadruple dipping for Star Wars (I've got VHS, DVD, blu-ray and now UHD box sets) . As to the mostly UHD releases of blu-rays I'm guessing you meant to say existing catalog blu-rays. Yet even there you are missing new releases like 1917, Joker, Birds of Fire, Onwards, etc which are in the deals.

Blu-rays are there to keep what may be substantial extras on them, leaving more disc space on the UHDs allowing for less compression to be used.
Star Wars. Hmm. If they paid me to watch them maybe but not the other way around.;)

I will buy UHD if I think the film itself is worth it. 1917 got that also have Joker a film I was disappointed with. I've double, triple dipped some of my real favourites, Gladiator, Glory, Saving Private Ryan, Alien, Close Encounters, Jaws all of which have been a good upgrade over the blu rays. I'll certainly get Lawrence of Arabia if it ever comes out as a standalone release.

Unfortunately there's a dearth of quality new films because of the pandemic and I can't see anything on the horizon worth buying on any media at the moment.
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
I’ve double-dipped a couple of times, but have culled a lot of my discs, as having watched them they end-up in the ‘meh’ pile, and just sit on shelves, gathering dust. My collection, now only a couple of hundred discs on BR and DVD, represents the stuff that I want to watch more than once, when I want to and not at the behest of any streaming service, assuming that it’s actually available. Given my collection, I already know that that’s unlikely.

Many people like the convenience of streaming. It saves having to have a player lying around, buying discs, storing them, etc. Moreover, it means that the choice of what to watch is made for them, so they don’t need to put any thought into the process. That streamed material is of lower quality than can be had via disc is of little consequence. It still surprises me just how many people are happy to listen to music compressed out of all real recognition in mp3 format.

But streaming is being forced upon us. I want to see the film Lucky Grandma. I can find it on iTunes, Amazon Video (I think) but not on disc here in the UK. Same with the film Extreme Job. Both films are up for grabs as region A discs, but I can’t justify grabbing an MR BR player for just a few titles. So if I use streaming, then I reinforce the idea that streaming is what people want. It’s a no-win situation, where business is dictating what we do with our leisure time. That’s why I foresee the end of physical media at some point in the not-to-distant future. Big business will decide the fate of our hobby/interest, however much we want to keep watching stuff in the best possible quality.
 

goingoingong

Distinguished Member
Can I still buy that ancient content called books? Yes, despite them also being available in a non physical format.
Can I still buy vinyl and something to play it on? Yes, despite them also being available in non physical format
Can I still buy CDs and something to play them on? Yes, despite them also being available in a non physical format.
Can I still buy software on physical discs and something to play them on? Yes, despite them also being available in a non physical format.

So I don't see why DVDs, blu-rays and UHDs would be the only odd men out in the format wars in the near future. All are cheap to produce and high profit items.
 

Ekko Star

Distinguished Member
Streaming and digital content is great but there really is nothing like actually owning the physical media for me.

When you buy a disk it's yours, it's tangible and it's and yours to keep.
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
So I don't see why DVDs, blu-rays and UHDs would be the only odd men out in the format wars in the near future. All are cheap to produce and high profit items.
I agree, to a point. But physical sales of media are on the slide, both for video and audio. Streaming is more convenient with easier access. Manufacturers will only keep production of players running whilst significant demand is there. Once the economics become unsustainable then production ceases.

In addition to my carefully curated set of video titles, I also have 600+ CDs that I enjoy listening to. My BR players perform double duty so wear and tear will take its toll, so I certainly want access to players to continue, but I don’t need a new machine every five minutes. Expecting to be able to always buy a player is, I think, a bit of a gamble. I do have two machines in boxes as backup. That in itself is a risk, as things degrade over time even if unused.

I recognise that for vinyl, the resurgence is in part down to people liking to be able to have sleeve notes and so forth, and of course there’s that unique vinyl sound. I prefer reading books — I couldn’t get on with an e-reader device, hateful things. The analogue version is fine for me! The fact remains though: I buy fewer films now, partly because what I want to watch doesn’t seem to be available, but also because streaming often provides access to stuff that I’ll only ever watch once, saving me the cost of getting a media version, assuming that I can find it. Those actions help fuel the streaming demand at the expense of buying media, which makes me part of the problem that I’m complaining about!
 

gibbsy

Moderator
I also have 600+ CDs that I enjoy listening to. My BR players perform double duty so wear and tear will take its toll
It's really only worth playing CDs if you are using an analogue connection between the blu ray player and amp. HDMI is lousy for music. A standalone CDP will do a better job than the blu ray player in my experience.
 

silent ninja

Well-known Member
I've just bought a new OLED TV and want to enjoy 4k titles. I don't particularly want to buy physical media - it's just not convenient and clutters the place - and I now see Bluray is dying. That really is a shame. Choice is always better.

However, on the streaming front where can you buy 4k UHD movies? It's incredibly limited. Here are a few examples of obvious titles. I use Google Movies and Prime and the library is just tiny.

Mission Impossible series
Gladiator
Logan
Alien(s)
+ dozens more

I would have thought with Bluray disappearing, online platforms would massively boost their catalogues(?)
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
It's really only worth playing CDs if you are using an analogue connection between the blu ray player and amp. HDMI is lousy for music. A standalone CDP will do a better job than the blu ray player in my experience.
I disagree. I did a lot of a/b testing, comparing HDMI, optical/coaxial and analogue. In my setup, neither my wife or I could discern any real difference. That’s not to say that they don’t exist, but the differences, if any, are slight. Blanket statements need qualification! :D
 

gibbsy

Moderator
I disagree. I did a lot of a/b testing, comparing HDMI, optical/coaxial and analogue. In my setup, neither my wife or I could discern any real difference. That’s not to say that they don’t exist, but the differences, if any, are slight. Blanket statements need qualification! :D
I've got three disc spinners in my system. At one point I had a Pioneer LX58 connected by HDMI to a Denon X6200 receiver, also connected to the Denon by analogue was a Marantz cd6006. The CD performance from the LX58 was very poor, the analogue performance from the Marantz was better, more open. I tried the analogue connection from the LX58 to the Denon and used the direct function on the Pioneer player, the sound was similar in scope to that produced by the Marantz. Not an A/B test but an improvement overall bringing the Pioneer closer to the performance of the Marantz.

The weakness in the system was a digital connection (although even analogue is subjected to some digital interference on Denons) to the Denon receiver. That receiver itself was quite a poor performer for stereo music. If you use HDMI for CD playback then, unless your have a stereo receiver or a more capable receiver for music such as the Arcam range then HDMI is always going to compromise audio performance.

Now I have three disc spinners in use at the moment. A Pioneer LX500 connected to a Denon X6500 via HDMI only, not only for film and TV but multi channel SACD playback. Now, thankfully, I don't have to play stereo music through the Denon and a Rega stereo amp has those duties for the last three years.

Why HDMI is poor is because of what is needed by the majority of people using multi disc spinners is a receiver's inability to portray stereo music adequately. Analogue improves on that performance but is still hampered by the receiver's overall performance. I've not tried optical or coax, little point with a Denon receiver.
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
We'll have to agree to disagree then. HDMI connectivity works fine for me! It seems that the Denon is a weak link in the chain.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
We'll have to agree to disagree then. HDMI connectivity works fine for me! It seems that the Denon is a weak link in the chain.
Wouldn't be an AV forum if we didn't. ;)

Not going to argue the point as HDMI for me is only used for multi channel sources, SACD, DVD-A and BR Audio for which it is pretty essential.
 

stasis

Active Member
I think there will be a niche market for universal players for some time yet.
I received Pink Floyd - Delicate Sound of Thunder Blu-ray today and the quality of the disc is amazing.
Even if streaming can match the quality many people will want to own a physical disc that they can play anytime in the future.
Streaming is also a future threat to all AV equipment when all you need is a TV. As TV gets larger it is easier to incorporate decent performing speakers that can satisfy most peoples needs.
Others may opt to have a sound bar only.
 

rccarguy2

Well-known Member
I've been buying bd 1080p movies, usually from cex...ie district 9 was 75p!

4k discs are too much.

Even a good dvd looks good on 4k oledbit it has to be a good transfer.

Movies like uncle buck are fine on dvd for 50p
 

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