Is anyone else holding off on buying a new TV because you don't want to Wall Mount it yourself?

MrMrH

Active Member
I am looking at new TVs and like the look of the wall mounted GX/G1 and would love to have it a bit higher to keep it away from my kids, but I'm a bit concerned about wall mounting something that expensive and am wondering if others feel the same? or if they worked out how to get past their concerns.
 

vickster

Distinguished Member
Tradesmen are still working in many trades?
 

BorkenArrow

Well-known Member
Bugger all that wall chasing, got myself a nice hand made cabinet to take my new LG OLED and the Sky box goes in the cabinet along with the Nintendo switch.

Goodbye cables.

IMG_20201120_135817432.jpg
 

Notorious PIG

Well-known Member
Moved into a new house a few months ago, a rental, so we decided to get a stand for the tv on wheels, it works great cos we just swing it round between lounge and dining area, whichever angle we want. Much more minimal and much cheaper than a cabinet and much less invasive/more versatile than wall mounting. Probably not ideal for those with kids running around though, admittedly.
 

vm1451

Active Member
I am looking at new TVs and like the look of the wall mounted GX/G1 and would love to have it a bit higher to keep it away from my kids, but I'm a bit concerned about wall mounting something that expensive and am wondering if others feel the same? or if they worked out how to get past their concerns.
What are the concerns?
 

MrMrH

Active Member
My first concern is trying to keep them out of reach of the kids, plus if it's on a wall it frees up the top of the cabinet and creates space for a soundbar while I work on the business case for In-Wall speakers from the boss.

Next concern is Covid and the super slow rollout here in Ireland I don't particularly want a stranger in my house as we are trying to minimise risk as much as possible.

Final concern is gravity, I'm terrified of mounting it myself and doing something wrong and it falling. I tried using a stud finder on the wall I would use but it's throwing up really inconsistent results ... huge gaps between studs, studs seeming to disappear part way up a wall (the room on other side of that wall is where ethernet and speaker cable was routed to when the house was originally built).
 

vm1451

Active Member
Last paragraph answers my question.

Nothing to be afraid of really. Your current TV looks to be a 49"? So no real weight, but your talking about a new one so what kind of size are we talking?

PB will hold quite a lot of weight, (up to 30Kg's/ square meter), so depending on the wall mount chosen you can, (using the right fixings), go straight to the board; although to be fair this does assume the board is fixed properly in the first place!

If you want "belt & braces", you can pick up on the studs, but the chances of these being exactly where you want them are slim to non. So if this does prove to be the case you can screw a sheet of ply to the studs and then mount the wall bracket to the ply.

Finding the studs can be a bit of a pain but there are a few ways to do it. DIY stud finders tend to be carp but you can hire decent tools for a half day to mark off the studs that you need to screw into. If your going to mount ply, then you can mark of the sheet on the wall and cut a hole in the PB to find the studs, the ply will then cover the hole when mounted, (you could also use this hole to pull any cables through that you want).

Does that allay your fears? :)
 

mikej

Well-known Member
Final concern is gravity, I'm terrified of mounting it myself and doing something wrong and it falling. I tried using a stud finder on the wall I would use but it's throwing up really inconsistent results ... huge gaps between studs, studs seeming to disappear part way up a wall (the room on other side of that wall is where ethernet and speaker cable was routed to when the house was originally built).

If you're intending to use a fixed (or even tilting) TV wall mount on a stud plasterboard wall, the forces acting on it probably aren't as scary as you think. It's cantilever brackets that can be more of a concern, because the weight of a TV pulled away from a wall on a cantilever bracket introduces forces that will effectively be trying to pull the bracket fixings out of the plasterboard, whereas the forces on the fixings resulting from the weight of a TV mounted flat against the wall will be mostly directed downwards through the plasterboard, so much less of an issue.

When mounting a TV bracket to a stud wall, you ideally want as many screws located in the stud-work as possible, especially if it's a cantilever bracket. Brackets usually have a big selection of holes to use but there's obviously an element of luck involved, presuming that you have an exact position you want the bracket to be in.

In any places where you have to mount to the plasterboard alone, it's important to use the correct type of fixings - eg. heavy-duty, toggle-type fixings that are inserted and expand to spread the load behind the plasterboard, rather than the usual rawlplug style, more lightweight fixings. Using a decent number of appropriately placed screws or fixings along a bracket's length ensures that the load is distributed evenly and at least one or two of those screws located in the stud-work will make things even more secure.

For info - vertical studs in a partition wall are usually 40cm, 45cm or 60cm apart and normally run floor to ceiling. Horizontal studs ('noggins') can sometimes be staggered, so may not run perfectly horizontally along a wall.

If you've got experience of doing DIY jobs like putting up shelves, then mounting a TV bracket really isn't that different. If you haven't got much experience, then getting a friend or relative to help who has is the way forward if you want to avoid having to get a professional in.
 

MrMrH

Active Member
Thanks @mikej and @vm1451 - those are the types of very detailed answers I love these forums for.

I do currently have a 49" TV but plan for my next to be 65" (would aim higher but don't see the point as if I did my wife would probably kick me out, and then I wouldn't get to enjoy it).
 

vm1451

Active Member
Modern TV's really arn't that heavy. As mikej says though, (and I should have!), there is leverage to consider if your mount allows the TV to swing away from the wall. If your mount of choice is static then fixings such as Rawlplug UNO, (grey), will be ok direct to the board. If your going for the cantilever type of mount then I would be inclined to go the ply route.
 
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La Finta Nonna

Active Member
The first time you attempt to affix a telly to the wall it can be a bit scary once you have fixed the back plate to the wall and then you clip the telly on it can be a case of is it safe to step away or will it bounce off the floor but you will soon get the hang of it. The important thing to remember is that if you buy from currys you don’t want the know nowt crew wreaking havoc.
 

cydavidho

Active Member
Thanks @mikej and @vm1451 - those are the types of very detailed answers I love these forums for.

I do currently have a 49" TV but plan for my next to be 65" (would aim higher but don't see the point as if I did my wife would probably kick me out, and then I wouldn't get to enjoy it).
When you mount your TV, do not mount it too high, it will be very uncomfortable to watch, i.e. neck pain (and bad for kids hurt them even more!). Ideally, in a sit down position, aim at eye level point to the middle of the screen. See below link for reference:


Mounting modern TV should be straight forward, as most are fairly lightweight under 30kg. Unless you have to deal a heavy weight one like below, a 250KG 103" plasma, then it will be a different story.

1618916433089.png
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
Another option is one of these Amazon product
I bought this exact one. It's height adjustable and easily tucks away behind current tv unit* freeing up space for a center speaker/soundbar. All wiring can be ran up/down the support column for wire free viewing.

*assuming unit is on feet with no central foot as base on the cantilever cannot be removed.
 

MrMrH

Active Member
When you mount your TV, do not mount it too high, it will be very uncomfortable to watch, i.e. neck pain (and bad for kids hurt them even more!). Ideally, in a sit down position, aim at eye level point to the middle of the screen. See below link for reference:

The TV height is an interesting one, I want to wall mount it to allow for a 30cm high center speaker and my TV stand is 64cm high already.
 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
That would mean (man maths here) the top of your TV would be getting towards 7ft off the ground.

30cm center is some speaker...mine is 18cm and has 2*6.5" mids
 

cydavidho

Active Member
The TV height is an interesting one, I want to wall mount it to allow for a 30cm high center speaker and my TV stand is 64cm high already.
Have a read of this thread, people laugh at those who mount TV too high. Don't make the same mistake at home. :)

 

Hixs

Distinguished Member
An angled TV at height is quite comfortable if you tend to slouch when watching TV or have a reclining seat (very popular in America)
 

MrMrH

Active Member
I might have to look at a replacement TV Cabinet, it's hard to find the perfect one.
(actually I did find some good ones a while back but they are hard to get on this side of the Atlantic)
 

Zombie Twin

Well-known Member
My new Panny GZ950 on the wall last year, with the work done by the wife and I - she's always been unnaturally good with tools, DIY, woodwork, metalwork, etc, which was a major help. The process of installing it is pretty straightforward, just as long as you apply logic. Ours is a brick-based house, with plasterboard not being an issue.

I used the same brackets I bought about 8 years ago, supposed to hold up to 90kgs, and even though they were inexpensive, nothing has budged or buckled in 9 months of use. All done with the appropriate hex-bolts and Rawlplugs, it's placed at eyelevel when sitting on the sofa, and not having kids means not worrying about the little sods coming into contact with it.

If that's a problem, then might I suggest...

1619006029483.png
 
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Nimby

Member
Try a compass to find the wall studs.
It will show you exactly where the nails are. (Usually at both ends.)

Screen height is an interesting subject.
Our 55" Sony OLED leans backwards [a lot] on its supplied stand.
You'd think it would be very noticeable but isn't.

The TV sits on a steel "Hifi" stand. Height very non-adjustable!
I am often tempted to fit two, slotted, shelf support channels from floor to ceiling.
Then to hang the TV [on a proper TV bracket] off those.
Then it would be well supported, upright and we could adjust it to any height we liked.
The center speaker would be placed just below the TV as at present.

The slotted shelf channels are strong, quite smart and low impact on walls in the domestic scene.
It would be childproof if you avoid fitting lower shelves for the kids to climb on.
 
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