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IR Photography

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by seany, Aug 11, 2004.

  1. seany

    seany
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  2. woody67

    woody67
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    You really have to be careful about subject matter, or the photo just becomes another over-exposed, grainy B&W shot.

    People seem to thing that IR photography is some 'High-tech' and magical connotations ... "Hey, its infra-red!!!", when in fact it is not that special.

    It can make some really moody, dramatic landscapes. And if you throw in an church, ruin or graveyard it can make a cool photo.

    Alas, IR shots can be improved further in Photoshop - or even made from a 'normal' image
     
  3. RobertP

    RobertP
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    I've taken quite a few IR pictures using a Hoya R72 filter on my Oly c5050. The R72 is almost opaque to visible light.

    The clarity of the results depends more on the sensitivity of the camera to IR. On my previous Kodak IR shots were near impossible as the internal filter blocked nearly all of it. The Oly is much better but still not a *good* IR camera.

    I would dissagree that you could get similar results in Photoshop. Different things react in varying amounts to IR - three similar green trees will look completely different in IR. The mix of some elements in the picture being near negative of reality whilst others are normal makes it interesting to dabble in.

    To take the stunning shots you see on some web sites you need a camera with no internal IR blocking filter - or a very weak one.

    A link to an IR web site - which also has links to other pages on IR.
     
  4. Boink!

    Boink!
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    I've been shooting digital infrared for a couple of years now. I started with a second hand Nikon CoolPix 950 (only 2.1MP, but great for hand held infrared exposures!) and now also use a Nikon CoolPix 5700, which is far less sensitive, so exposures are longer and a tripod is a must (but, I didn't just buy it for IR ;) ). I use H&H 89b or Hoya R72 infrared filters. The best times to take infrared photographs is in the mornings and afternoons, as you'll get better definition with black skies and white grass & trees.

    Examples of CP950:

    Infrared means, "Stop!"
    St. Andrews, Rochford
    Glastonbury Abbey
    Unknown church in the Scottish highlands
    M1 services

    Examples of CP5700:

    Central Park, NY
    London cemetary
    Hyde Hall, Essex
    Phoenix Brewery, Rochdale
    Derelict chimney, Rochdale

    Regards,

    Jon
     

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