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Intel announce the 22nm 3D transistor - Moore's Law still on track...

Chadford

Distinguished Member
A *big* step improvement in transistor technology.

The 22nm 3D transistor...
37% performance increase or 50% less power.
~3% more expensive to produce.
Devices available in volume early next year.

Pretty impressive stuff. :thumbsup:

More details here...
Intel debuts '3D transistors' with 22nm chip recipe • The Register



The technology explained here in a very easy to understand video...

YouTube - Video Animation: Mark Bohr Gets Small: 22nm Explained


I'll predict this technology will be used to produce the Apple A6 chip to be found in the iPhone 6.
Intel to produce Apple :D


Edit: Nice picture here...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-13283882
 
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weetsie

Prominent Member
am i right in thinking that 22nm is 45% smaller than 32nm yet only 37% faster? if so we had 65nm 5 years ago surely technology today is a bit behind moore's law?
 

Chadford

Distinguished Member
am i right in thinking that 22nm is 45% smaller than 32nm yet only 37% faster? if so we had 65nm 5 years ago surely technology today is a bit behind moore's law?

I would imagine that Intel will be playing it safe to establish the technology before tweeking and optimising it to get further performance benefits out of this new architecture.
 

DPinBucks

Distinguished Member
am i right in thinking that 22nm is 45% smaller than 32nm yet only 37% faster? if so we had 65nm 5 years ago surely technology today is a bit behind moore's law?
Linearly, 22nm is 32% smaller than 32nm. However, it's area which counts, and you can get twice as many 22nm devices in a given area than with 32nm.

Moore's law is an indication of packing density. Processing power or speed need not follow the same curve, because architecture comes into play, usually lagging behind.

But then there are quantum leaps in architecture, such as multi-core processors. If you look at Wikipedia, you'll see that some quad core devices outstrip Moore.

I think the new Intel device is about on the Moore line.
 

Naqv

Prominent Member
AMD was the first to demonstrate such a technology back in 2008, when they actually produced a prototype.
Intel has just managed to commercialize it quicker due to its vast resources.

Just giving credit where its due.
 

rickinyorkshire

Distinguished Member
So in general this is a smaller/faster/less power hungry CPU ya?
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
Yup reading about this yesterday over at AnandTech. This is amazing. Good thing I'm planning an Ivy Bridge build at the end of the year :smashin:
 

kav

Distinguished Member
Hmmm...I must have misread something on the Computer forums.

Edit: Yeah, apologies for the confusion, I just read somebody's post wrong, which is why I was asking about 28nm.
 
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shodan

Distinguished Member
DPinBucks said:
Moore's law is an indication of packing density.

So Moore really is less then...?





I'll get me coat..
 

Sniper Ash6

Distinguished Member
Ivy Bridge is 28nm, right?
Ivy Bridge = 22nm
Bulldozer = 28nm
NVIDIA's Kepler = 28nm (6xx series of GPUs)
AMD's Southern Islands = 28nm (HD7xxx series of GPUs)

:)
 

Singh400

Distinguished Member
This is good news all round IMO. Intel currently owns the high end crown and will for the foreseeable future. And AMD takes control of the bang per buck market, so budget system builders win there.
 

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