Insurance advice needed after bump

Lakes_Puma

Active Member
Hi all, I hope someone can shed a bit of light as to what is likely to happen next with my insurance renewals etc.

I have been driving for about 18 years without an incident (speeding or accident) but last Friday I “rubbed” into another car, the bottom line was I found myself in the wrong lane approaching a roundabout and indicated to move across into the left lane but no car was letting me out and as I was rapidly running out of road I tried to move into the gap between two cars but the front car stopped at the roundabout (which as far as I can recall back was empty) and I caught the off side rear wing of the other car. No one was injured and the total damage was a bit of a ripple to both the other cars rear wing and my front wing.

Now this is where it gets complicated, I have two cars both insured with different policies I use one for commuting work (the car I was in the accident with) and have the other car for “pleasure”. I’ve only just purchased the “work” car so had no no-claims bonus on it anyway, but I have full no claims bonus on the other car.

So what is likely to happen when I come to re-new the insurance on both cars (at separate times)?
 

welshtommo

Novice Member
The most likey scenario is that both your premiums will increase. You are required, by law, to declare your accident to both insurance companies, even though the accident you had was not in your "pleasure" car. Your no claims for the work car is not an issue, because as you say, you don't have any. You are likely to be penalised on the other policy unless you have a protected no claims option?
Unfortunately though, there is no hard and fast rule because insurance companies do react differently. How much your premiums go up and what sort of penalty you will incur on your no claims will be dependent on their view of the accident and their own guidelines. You may be lucky and find that you will have a very small, or even, no penalty increase in your premiums, although the latter is unlikely. You are likely to lose your no claims bonus, because, by the very nature of the scheme, you are making a claim. This in itself will no doubt increase your premium.
Can't be any more specific than that because, as I said, it will be dependant on each company. Budget for an increase in both though............

Hope this helps?

Tommo.
 
D

Deleted member 13294

Guest
Tommo has it right - you'll have to declare the accident on your other insurance at renewal time.

Hopefully you've got protected no-claims, so won't lose out too much.

Whatever you do, don't be tempted to not declare this. The potential consequence of being uninsured for any claims you might have to make is far, far worse than the modest increase you'll probably have to pay.
 

DVD-Man

Well-known Member
Surely he can't lose his no claims for the pleasure car policy for not claiming on it?

Liam
 
D

Deleted member 13294

Guest
His previous claims history will be taken into account, regardless of no claims status.

So it has to be declared, and it may affect his premium.
 

Lakes_Puma

Active Member
If it affects my NCD on my pleasure car I'll be fuming :mad: I couldn't use this no claims when taking out the policy for my work car.
 

Lakes_Puma

Active Member
Why not - what insurance company is it. It is the driver's claims record not the car's....isn't it ?
That's what I said to the insurance company (many of them) but no it appears not to be as you would think!
 

welshtommo

Novice Member
Surely he can't lose his no claims for the pleasure car policy for not claiming on it?

Liam
:oops: Sorry, confused myself talking about your two different cars and policies. Let me try to clarify - you are unlikely to lose any NCD on your leisure car as you are not making a claim on this policy. You are likely to see a premium increase upon renewal however, because you have had an accident and made a claim on the work car policy. The work car policy of course, is also likely to increase. As Squiffy says, don't be tempted not to declare it to the company covering your leisure car. Insurance companies share information, so worst case scenario is that should you need to claim on it and they find out, your insurance will be nullified and they won't pay out. Worse still, in this case, if the claim is as a result of an accident, you may well be prosecuted by the police for having no insurance, and also obtaining services or pecuniary advantage by deception........Not good! :eek:

Tommo.
 

Steve.J.Davies

Novice Member
That's what I said to the insurance company (many of them) but no it appears not to be as you would think!
I just had myself put on my son's policy as an additional driver - my no claims record counted. same as when I phone around for quotes on the main car. confused... especially as if it is per car then your claim record on another car 'should' be irrelevant. then again that's my logic, not the insurance company's...
 

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