installing french windows

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by nathsea, May 3, 2004.

  1. nathsea

    nathsea
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    Hi,

    Next weekend we will be removing an old wooden framed window and installing a UPVC french window in its place.

    What is the best tool we can hire/buy that will enable us to get a good clean cut down the brick work , we are expecting a lot of dust but if it can be avoided that would be great!!

    Also anybody done this before and got any tips?

    Many Thanks

    Nathan

    P.S. if this is in the wrong forum please fell free to move!!!
     
  2. Brian110507

    Brian110507
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    There is only one sensible tool to cut a straight line in brickwork - A 9" Angle grinder with a masonary disc in it. To get the old woodwork out there's nothing like a wrecking bar.

    Sounds like you might be thinking of making the opening a bit wider - BEWARE there is a lintel over the opening and if you cut beyond that a chunk of your house will collapse sooner or later. Your new door should be the same width overall as the old one.
     
  3. DJW

    DJW
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    Refdust, the room you are cuuting in to , is going to get covered. Best to tape up all joints around your internal door to stop it spreading to the rest of the house.......believe me it will otherwise :lesson:
     
  4. IronGiant

    IronGiant
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    I've done this a couple of times. You will most likely need to cut from both sides, so make a tent on the inside with lots of tape and decorating sheets to contain the dust. There will be a lot of this... If possible take the window out first so as much dust as possible can escape to the outside. You will get a cleaner cut and much less dust with a diamond blade as they are thinner and harder, and one blade should do the whole job, while you might get through several masonary blades to do the same job. However it is arguable that the masonary abrasive blades are safer and easier to use. You can buy a cheap grinder for very little money these days, but if it's a one off getting a better quality (110V and so safer) hire job might be better.
    HTH
    Dave
     
  5. nathsea

    nathsea
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    many thanks for your replies....
    the door width is exactly the same width as the window i`m replacing so there should`nt be a problem with the lintel.

    I have looked on the hss hire website and they do a low dust cutter, that cuts 10" deep , has anybody used one of these?

    With regards to the disc cutter it appears you can get them quite cheap from places like screwfix, will these be sufficient as this is the only job I want to use it for?

    Many Thanks

    Nathan
     
  6. Brian110507

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    The cheap one I bought from Screwfix (£30 - code no. 18583) has more than paid for itself - cutting Paving slabs, - brick paviors - and brick walls with ease for more than a year now. cost you that to hire one for a weekend.
    Their discs are also very good and cheap.
     
  7. Stereo Steve

    Stereo Steve
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    Assuming you have a cavity block wall you should be OK. You'll need aforementioned angle grinder. 9" is fine and there are some great bargains in the DIY stores. I got one from Focus for about £25 and it's done up a barn which means an awful lot of cutting down stone and slate. My previous Makita died on me. This one can be chucked when (if ever) it packs up. As for blades, a diamond one will cost you about £80 but will do a hell of a lot of work. A Hire shop will hire you one and charge for the wear. In your case a couple masonry cutting disks should do it.

    One tip is to cut down the outside before removing the glass, that means less dust inside. You can if you wish mark cut line inside and drill many holes down it about 1" apart. The blocks will then break cleany along the line when persuaded with a sledge. You need a good powerful hammer drill for this option but it will be considerably cleaner.
     
  8. Stereo Steve

    Stereo Steve
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    Oh yeah and you'll need a set of goggles and a very good dust mask with the grinder. It will produce choking clouds.
     
  9. nathsea

    nathsea
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    once again, many thanks for your replies,

    It looks like I`ll be off to the diy sheds then to get another powertool :)

    Has anyone fitted these before, anything in particular I should keep an eye out for whilst installing?

    Nathan
     
  10. Stereo Steve

    Stereo Steve
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    Pay particular attention to your levels. Get everything spot on with a spirit level, horizontally and vertically. It'll pay in the end.
     
  11. Paul D

    Paul D
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    Like Steve, i cut the external bricks before removing the window.

    Mark your cut line with bright white chalk first, and then lightly run the grinder down this line several times, going deeper each time.
    Trying to make the cut in one pass can lead to the disc going off on a little excursion!:oops:

    If your inner bricks are therma blocks, then they can simply be cut with a large toothed saw.

    Use plenty of packing wedges around the frame, and test the doors fit properly BEFORE fixing with frame bolts.

    Depending on the gap around the frame, i use either mortar or foam filler then finish with "External Grade" silicone.
    A little trick is to place masking tape about 1/2" either side of the area to be siliconed. Once you have run your bead of silicone and smoothed(wet thumb), simply remove the tape and you have perfect edges with zero mess.

    Remember to check how the frame drains water. Some drain above the sill with little plugs, some drain through the bottom.
    Just make sure bottom drainers holes aren't blocked etc.:smashin:
     
  12. Stereo Steve

    Stereo Steve
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    Yep, expaniding foam is no longer considered a bodge unless that's all that holds the frame in! It's a great product and can be used once the frame is braced and trigged up. Fire it in and leave to dry. Then simply cut off the excess witha light saw. The mess will be covered by your cover strips. It will grip the frame very tightly in the gap and produce a perfect seal.
     

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