In wall speaker wire broken

lenser

Novice Member
I ran in wall speaker wires for my new home before sheetrock and verified they all worked. Now I'm moved into the house one of the speaker wires failed the continuity test. I tied the wires on one end together and used a multimeter on the other end and got no signal.

Running a new wire is not an option. Is there any way to track where the could have broke, open a hole in the wall and repair?
 

gibbsy

Moderator
I ran in wall speaker wires for my new home before sheetrock and verified they all worked. Now I'm moved into the house one of the speaker wires failed the continuity test. I tied the wires on one end together and used a multimeter on the other end and got no signal.

Running a new wire is not an option. Is there any way to track where the could have broke, open a hole in the wall and repair?
Welcome to the Froums.

I've moved your question to this part of the Forum.
 

noiseboy72

Well-known Member
You can try and inject a low voltage alternating current - such as from a 9V AC power adapter and then use a de-tuned AM radio to see if you can hear where the hum level drops. Just connect 1 core at a time and only to 1 terminal or output from the adapter. It will act as a crude, low frequency transmitter and the wire as an antenna.
 

lenser

Novice Member
You can try and inject a low voltage alternating current - such as from a 9V AC power adapter and then use a de-tuned AM radio to see if you can hear where the hum level drops. Just connect 1 core at a time and only to 1 terminal or output from the adapter. It will act as a crude, low frequency transmitter and the wire as an antenna.
Is there a dedicated tool to do something like this?
 

noiseboy72

Well-known Member
Yep, but they are quite expensive. Not sure if you would find one that would work with relatively short lengths of speaker cable, as they tend to be more for data cables.
 

neilball

Well-known Member
My Fluke cable qualification kit identify how far the cable runs until the break but it costs around £1000, so it’s not cheap!! You might be able to use a simple tone-test kit for a few tens of pounds and see if you lose the tone where the break occurs.
 

neilball

Well-known Member
Blimey, I just looked up my Fluke Intellitone 200 kit and it’s over £200 now, and the cable qualifier kit is over £2.5k! I guess prices have increased significantly over the last couple of years since I bought mine.

The basic tone testing kit shown above should work well enough. You could also get something similar from Amazon to for similar money.
 

lenser

Novice Member
Tone and probe kit didn't work. Wires burried too deep in the walls.

Instead I'm considering running two 8ohm speakers in series for total of 16 ohms with one wire so they will be both be mono.

Can most receivers handle 16ohm impedance? I'm using monoprice multizone amp.
 

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