In Line Speaker Switch

bdgood

Standard Member
I have 2 tower speakers that I would like to use only sometimes. My system does not have an option for A and B speakers or anything like that. But, it has enough power to be able to connect two sets of speakers to one set of connections. So I could plug the tower speakers in when I want them.

However, I would rather have some kind of switch in the line so that if I want the tower speakers on, I would just reach behind the component cabinet and flip a switch, in effect connecting the speakers.

In my mind this would mean that I need some kind of switch that has 8 connectors, 2 speakers, 2 wires each, which makes 4 wires in and 4 wires out.

When the switch is off, all wires are "disconnected". When the switch is on, all wires are connected, connecting each one separately from it's "in" to it's out.

This also could be accomplished by adding an inline switch to each of the wires, and flipping 4 switches, but I would love to have it all in one switch. I know I could do it with some kind of electrical relay but I was hoping that there was something specifically for AV systems and that I'm not the only one who has ever wanted to do this.

Any ideas? Thanks
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
It would seem the logical solution to needing a Speaker Switch Box, would be to buy a Speaker Switch Box -

Speaker switch box - Google Product Search

Speaker Switching Units - Audiovisual Online - High Quality Audio Video Cables and Accessories

To some extent, let you wallet be your guide, but don't get a Switch that is too cheap. I would say the QED and similar would be about right -

QED SS21 2 WAY PARALLEL SPEAKER SWITCH - available from Superfi UK

This will take the speaker output of a single stereo source, and using the switches, direct that signal to one or both of two separate sets of speakers.


However, your amp's power rating has nothing to do with whether this will work. For this to work, the speakers need to be rated 8 ohms each, or your amp has to be able to drive unusually low impedance loads.

Specifically, what amp do you have?

And, while we are at it, specifically what speakers do you have?

Steve/bluewizard
 

bdgood

Standard Member
I have a ONKYO HT-R580 receiver.

The home theater speakers are the ONKYO SKF-580 and they are marked 6 ohms.

The tower speakers, which would be on the same switch are Saphire ST3. These are 8 ohms.

So does that mean I can't do it?

Is the QED only for sale in the UK? I am in the US.

Thanks.
 

Dr-Al

Standard Member
I have a ONKYO HT-R580 receiver.

The home theater speakers are the ONKYO SKF-580 and they are marked 6 ohms.

The tower speakers, which would be on the same switch are Saphire ST3. These are 8 ohms.

So does that mean I can't do it?

Is the QED only for sale in the UK? I am in the US.

Thanks.
If you run both sets of speakers in parallel, your amp will effectively be driving the equivalent of 3.4 Ohm speakers. You should check that the amp is capable of doing this. If it has short-circuit protection, it may cut the outputs when it detects a load with impedance as low as this.
 

degsy

Active Member
How about something like this?

Home HIFI
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
Simply search Google Shopping for "Speaker Switch Box" and let you wallet be your guide. There are plenty of them.

Here is one potential source -

http://www.parts-express.com/wizards/searchResults.cfm?srchExt=CAT&srchCat=723

How well you will get a 6 ohm and an 8 ohm to work together will depend on the subtle nature of each speakers. With some speakers you can probably get by with this, with others - No.

But to make even the remotest judgment, we would have to know specifically what the speaker are - brand and model.

I had a similar arrangement, some 8 ohm DIY and some 6 ohms Wharfedale Diamond 9.6. I work OK for me on two amps for music, however it shut the amp down during 'Lord of the Rings', but the volume level was pretty high at the time.

It gets down to electrical current. The lower the impedance, the higher the current; the higher the current, the greater the heat; the greater the heat, the more likely the amp is to shut down.

If you play at modest and reasonable volumes, you might be OK. But again, it depends on how demanding you are as a listener, and how demanding of electrical current these specific speaker are.

Steve/bluewizard
 
Last edited:

DrH

Active Member
Degsy,

I have been contemplated adding in a stereo amp into my HT. I want to run it seperate from the HT and that looks ideal. I was contemplating making one so thanks for the link.:smashin:

DrH
 

degsy

Active Member
Degsy,

I have been contemplated adding in a stereo amp into my HT. I want to run it seperate from the HT and that looks ideal. I was contemplating making one so thanks for the link.:smashin:

DrH
I have found this to be an excellent addition to my audio kit as it enables the simple independent connection of a stereo amp to drive the front 2 speakers purely for music playback. Even with an oldish stereo amp, this has transformed my listening experience - IMHO well worth the money. :thumbsup:
 

bdgood

Standard Member
OK, so thanks for all of the replies.

I like the looks of this one:

SS4 Speaker Selector Impedance Matching 1 Input 4 Output | Parts-Express.com

I am not that knowledgable as you guys but what I'm understanding is that by connecting two sets of speakers to the same connection (the front speaker connection of the home theater), it would lower the ohms and bump up the watts. And this switch handles that and stops it from going below 5 ohms. Do I have that correct so far?

So this seems like the ideal solution for me.

My receiver is:
ONKYO HT-R580 receiver which is part of the HT-S5300 home theater system.

User manual is here:
http://filedepot.onkyousa.com/Files/own_manuals/SN29400216_HT-S5300_En_web.pdf?CFID=1335071&CFTOKEN=12741567&jsessionid=f030dc5947fe1ccf0ff2722d457b754b6f34

The speakers that I will be connecting to this switch are:

The home theater speakers are the ONKYO SKF-580 and they are marked 6 ohms.

The tower speakers, which would be on the same switch are Saphire ST3. These are 8 ohms.

The manual for the ONKYO HT system says:

Maximum Effective Output Power (Asian):
7 ch x 160 W at 6 ohms, 1 kHz, 1 ch driven (IEC)

Dynamic Power:
180 W (3 ohm Front)
160 W (4 ohm Front)
100 W (8 ohm Front)

Speaker Impedance:
(North American) 6 ohm-16 ohm
(Others) 4 ohm-16 ohm

There are other specs but I don't think they are applicable to this discussion.

So what do you think? Will this unit work for me?

Thanks very much.
 
Last edited:

alasrati

Active Member
Do you actually ever want to have sound coming from both pairs of speakers at once? If not, then a simple switch that connects either one pair or the other will work fine and there will be no impedance issues.
 

bdgood

Standard Member
I guess I wouldn't need to run both sets of speakers at the same time if that makes it easier. What kind of a simple switch do you mean?

I could still use the switch in my last post and just not turn both of them on right?

Other switches are almost the same amount of money and I like that this one has the impedance thing in case I want to try both at the same time.

Thanks
 

alasrati

Active Member
Yeah the switch you posted will be fine and as you say will be safer in case you go crazy and want quad sound or something.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom