Improving WiFi Upstairs with AP or Powerline ?

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by topgazza, Jul 10, 2018 at 4:22 PM.

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  1. topgazza

    topgazza
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    I have an area upstairs that is not great for Wifi... its OK but not great. I want a more consistent WiFi and have a hard wired run to my iMac from the router. Can I plug that into a small 4 port switch and run a Cat cableout to an AP as a solution to cover upstairs?

    Or should I just use a powerline pair ? I put a TP Link WPA4226 kit in my daughters Uni house and she get great WiFi now in what was a poor spot.

    Ap is around £80-100 and TPLink is around £50 but I am more concerned with performance. I would mount the AP in my study on a wall
     
  2. cjed

    cjed
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    Yes. Although small switches are usually 5 port. It's worth paying the extra for a Gigabit one (even if you don't need that at the moment). Here's an example.

    The TP-Link kit you mention *is* an AP (Access Point), it's just connected via your mains wiring rather than a direct ethernet cable. You'll get better performance from a wired (via a switch) AP than from one linked via Powerline technology. However, if all you want is internet connectivity via WiFi, the Powerline solution may be simpler.
     
  3. mickevh

    mickevh
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    This is by far the best way to do it.

    If you wanted to save on a "box" and the location is convenient, you might consider using a "crippled" SOHO router as a combination switch/AP in the outpost locale, (even better if you have an old router lying around, as it could potentially cost you nothing.) There's a few hoops to jump through to cripple a SOHO router as required, but it's not difficult and is described in the "Using Two Routers Together" FAQ pinned in this forum.
     
  4. topgazza

    topgazza
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    Thanks cjed.

    And yes, I would get a gigabit switch to be on the "safe" side. Good tip

    I think the issue is either cabled AP of just use the TP Link. As I get an OK signal as is I might as well try the TP Link as a cheaper option just to give me that better performance upstairs. If that doesnt do what I want I can always go for a seperate AP..Uquititi probably
     
  5. topgazza

    topgazza
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    My instinct was to go for the cabled AP mick. I mught well buy both from Amazon and send the one back I dont want. In some respects the cabled is easier than the TP Link due to spare sockets
     
  6. mickevh

    mickevh
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    All Wi-Fi is availed by "AP's" in one form or another - things like HomePlugs and SOHO routers just happen to have an AP built into a box that does other things too - there's nothing particularly "magic" about stand alone AP's versus ones included in HomePlugs and SOHO routers (and phones, and printers, and servers, and, and, and...)

    BUT: :D There's AP's and AP's:- some are most decidedly more feature rich and perform better/worse than others. There's nothing for it but to trawl the spec. sheets. (Though some SOHO manufacturers seem to be a bit coy about the amount of information that provide.)
     
  7. topgazza

    topgazza
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    I have a Billion BIPAC 7300N which is "N" compliant. I'll have a read up but assume I can connect the cat6 straight to the router and out to my iMac as a "switch" and with a bit of a play broadcast the WiFi upstairs as an AP. I'll read that sticky
     
  8. mickevh

    mickevh
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    You should be able to. The LAN ports in a SOHO router are a built in ethernet switch.
     

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