IMAX remastering... upscaling of sorts?

snadge

Active Member
I see IRON MAN II is to be 're-mastestered' into IMAX for IMAX screens... what does this process involve - but more importantly is the quality any good when compared to something FILMED in 70mm IMAX film ... as IMAX captures 10 times more detail thats a hell of a lot of UPSCALING to do...

can anyone supply any info or share their views?


thanks
 
Well it's not going to be as good as 7omm, but Avatar was just open matte, which tries to use as much of the 36mm frame as possible, maybe 35,24*. Most movies use a cropped 36mm frame, which reduces the 35mm to about 25mm * 19mm*.

*Approximate guesses.

Maybe I shouldn't guess the sizes, they are just there as an example.
 
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snadge

Active Member
Well it's not going to be as good as 7omm, but Avatar was just open matte, which tries to use as much of the 36mm frame as possible, maybe 35,24*. Most movies use a cropped 36mm frame, which reduces the 35mm to about 34mm * 18mm*.

*Approximate guesses.

Maybe I shouldn't guess the sizes, they are just there as an example.

oh i thought Avatar was filmed in IMAX..?

so how do yo actually know that your watching a TRUE IMAX movie? when most of the stuff is just 'upscaled' or has 'sections' of movie filmed in IMAX like Transformers II and The Dark Knight...?

after all a 'True' IMAX experience should be the entire movie shot in 70mm film and played back on IMAX screen... isnt that a bit like saying "FULL HD EXPERIENCE" but using an SD source...?
 
oh i thought Avatar was filmed in IMAX..?

so how do yo actually know that your watching a TRUE IMAX movie? when most of the stuff is just 'upscaled' or has 'sections' of movie filmed in IMAX like Transformers II and The Dark Knight...?

after all a 'True' IMAX experience should be the entire movie shot in 70mm film and played back on IMAX screen... isnt that a bit like saying "FULL HD EXPERIENCE" but using an SD source...?

IMAX film is huge, heavy, expensive, and the cameras are too noisy to use a mic on the actors so the sound needs to be added later. the cameras usually need to be mounted on supports to hold them as well. As for SD, and HD, well they are film, not digital, so they are neither.
 

snadge

Active Member
IMAX film is huge, heavy, expensive, and the cameras are too noisy to use a mic on the actors so the sound needs to be added later. the cameras usually need to be mounted on supports to hold them as well. As for SD, and HD, well they are film, not digital, so they are neither.

thanks., I was referring to the SD+HD in terms of 'resolution' not 'physical media' ... anyway I enjoyed Avatar 3D IMAX (though our screen aint THAT big) and the Trailers and cant wait for all the new stuff this year and the 3D TV's and 3D BluRay that are supposed to be coming out soon
 
I think that Avatar will look great on Blu Ray anyway because most of it is CGI, and that transfers well to Blu Ray.
 

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
oh i thought Avatar was filmed in IMAX..?

so how do yo actually know that your watching a TRUE IMAX movie? when most of the stuff is just 'upscaled' or has 'sections' of movie filmed in IMAX like Transformers II and The Dark Knight...?

after all a 'True' IMAX experience should be the entire movie shot in 70mm film and played back on IMAX screen... isnt that a bit like saying "FULL HD EXPERIENCE" but using an SD source...?

There's a list of what movies have been upscaled for IMAX screen using DMR here:

List of IMAX DMR films - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I haven't had the chance to see Avatar at an IMAX yet but having watched Transformers: RotF and The Dark Knight at Waterloo IMAX it's quite noticeable the difference between 70mm and 35mm on a screen that huge :cool: It's a comparable to the difference between Blu-Ray and DVD on a large home projector screen imho.
 

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