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Image clarity on a Philips widescreen 28" TV

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by Danny_G13, Feb 25, 2005.

  1. Danny_G13

    Danny_G13
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    28PW6008/05 is the model number I believe, and I'm curious about something.

    The thing which has struck me above everything else about it is that the image clarity is just slightly blurry.
    The most substantial way of illustrating this is that with vertical lines, they're far thicker than they should be and just *slightly* ghost blackly to the right as a result.
    It's overall a pretty clear picture but this one thing I'm not used to.
    Is this a normal thing with widescreen TV's, or just those at the lower end of the market?

    Plus I notice at times a slight lack of definition with certain moments, particularly on DVD. I seem to be able to see the pixels and lines, and not the picture as naturally, in places.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. booker

    booker
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    I have a 32PW6542 and i has the same thing u are mention, i believe they are common, i called techincal support, they sent a guy and he said the TV was fine. This was normal as well...

    I guess you should try to tweak the Brigh/contr to try to reduce this effect.
     
  3. Zacabeb

    Zacabeb
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    It's probably caused by SVM (Scan Velocity Modulation), a "feature" which temporarily speeds up and slows down the movement of the electron beam where edges are detected in the picture. This makes the beam stay longer in the brighter half of the edge and making it brighter still, but because of this it also skips past the darker part of the edge, resulting in a black outline.

    SVM was invented to compensate for spot blooming in bright details, but today it's used ad nauseum to force upon the viewer a false impression of higher sharpness, rather than compensate for anything. It's creeping down through the product ranges, so it's pretty much unavoidable these days. :(
     

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