I'm considering on getting a new camcorder. I have a few questions about different mo

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by mixtape86, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. mixtape86

    mixtape86
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    Hey everyone, this is my first thread.

    I recently wanted to replace my MiniDV cameras with a new, smaller, digital camcorder. I started off looking at the Samsung HMX-H300 camera. Its low cost and high reviews intrigued me. However, as my searching went on, I noticed much better cameras could be had for a little bit more. I started to look at the Panasonic v700 and the Canon M500. These two cameras seem very comparable, but the Canon is currently much cheaper. I like that Canon offered the M500 version of the popular M50/M52 camera, as it trims the cost of the camera down when you take away things such a WiFi and internal storage (I have a card reader on my computer so lack of internal storage is ok for me).

    What will I lose out on if I go with the Canon M500 over the Panasonic V700? I've read many reviews, but I am having trouble understanding exactly what all the specs mean. I'm hoping someone can compare the two in layman's terms :rolleyes:. I've watched many "test videos" on YouTube, which is what made me rule out the H300, but have I overlooked any other/better cameras if I decide to go with the M500? There are so many models and brands. I want to make sure the M500 is the best choice for me.

    I am not a professional, but video/picture quality is important to me. I want to record family memories, much of which will require low light/indoor shooting. I believe the the Canon M500 will be worth the higher cost of the Samsung H300. The indoor/low light footage on YouTube is impressive. It has me curious; Is there any other brand/model better than this Canon in the same price range?

    Also, does anyone know if the M500 comes with a "starter" SD card? Meaning, can I start recording right out of the box, or will I need to purchase an SD card along with the camera? I was planning on getting a 32GB (Class 10) card in the future. However, if the M500 doesn't come with any storage, I might need that card sooner rather than later :p.

    I've read that UV filters are necessary for film cameras, but simply provide lens protection for digital cameras. If that's the case, I was thinking about ordering a "Marumi 43mm 43 Super DHG MC Lens Protect Slim Filter" along with my camera purchase. I see that "43mm Hoya UV (HMC) lens filter" is a popular choice too, but in a YouTube video I watched, they can actually lower the image quality just a tad (see link below). So would going with a protecting lens be better than a UV lens?

    Thanks so much! :)


    Links:

    Marumi 43mm 43 Super DHG MC Lens Protect Slim Filter
    Amazon.com: Marumi 43mm 43 Super DHG MC Lens Protect Slim Filter Japan: Camera & Photo

    43mm Hoya UV (HMC) lens filter
    Amazon.com: Hoya 43mm UV HMC Lens Filter: Camera & Photo

    Tiffen 43HZE 43mm UV Haze-1 Filter (Clear)
    Amazon.com: Tiffen 43HZE 43mm UV Haze-1 Filter (Clear): Electronics

    Transcend 32 GB Class 10 SDHC Flash Memory Card (TS32GSDHC10E)
    Amazon.com: Transcend 32 GB Class 10 SDHC Flash Memory Card (TS32GSDHC10E): Electronics

    Canon VIXIA HF M500 Full HD 10x Image Stabilized Camcorder with One SDXC Card Slot and 3.0 Touch LCD
    Amazon.com: Canon VIXIA HF M500 Full HD 10x Image Stabilized Camcorder with One SDXC Card Slot and 3.0 Touch LCD: Camera & Photo

    Sources:

    UV Filter vs No UV Filter - DigitalRev TV Test
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-e9TUIC-Dtk


     
  2. 12harry

    12harry
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    Hi, Welcome.

    That's quite a few q's... ( answers by paragraph ).

    1), Panas are popular here, Canon hardly gets a mention, except the £1k models. The v500, ( or v700 if you can stretch to it ). SDHC memory is the future and has some advantages IMHO for Editing and transfer into a PC for Editing.

    2), Be wary of "Reviews" on YT....you cannot know the test conditions - and the quality of discussion can vary lots.

    3), Everyone wants the best "quality" but for yr budget something has to give. In general camcorders with consumer-features may have less attention paid to the fundamentals. These are to do with the sensor size and lens quality - - - features that are not always easy to compare. Also the Optical Stabilisers all claim to be "the best" - but clearly there is almost no standard-test that might enable comparison.

    4), Read "box contents" - but don't be swayed by a small memory card thrown-in. Also, you may find 16G class 10 SDHC cards are good value, although a 32G will (naturally) last twice the time.

    5), UV filters are a good way of protecting the lens . . . For a budget camcorder the presence should make no difference in definition . . . and it may save damage to the coating, if you're too keen on keeping it clean. The only snag is when filming in sunshine, without a hood (or shade, etc) . . . is is possible the filter could introduce some "flare", but if you are filming that close to the sun . . . . move.
    -OR add a hood/shade . . . but this will probably mean you'll need a tripod to hold all this stuff. A good investment would be a £100 tripod with a Fluid Head a this will make your pans smoother.
    For indoor filming additional lighting is almost always necessary . . . and more-so where the camcorder is "budget" since this is one area that suffers as the sensor-size is reduced. A Pointer to this is the "filter-size" - but be grateful that at least there is a filter thread, since low-budget camcorders dispense with that feature.

    I think it is a good idea to buy at least two SDHC cards and try them in whatever camcorders yr Photostore has on offer. Pana is popular her, but I don't have one . . . but it would be a "safe" choice, IMHO.
    Good luck with yr choice.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
  3. chrishull3

    chrishull3
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    Dont discount Canon consumer range,Canon cams are up there with the best.The HV30 is i still have produced images that were better than previous semi pro models from other manufactuars i had ,The HFR range are good low cost start out models,but in this day and age the choices are so many from the makers.
     
  4. Bob++

    Bob++
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    I may be wrong but I think that the V500/700 has a 46mm thread.
     
  5. chrishull3

    chrishull3
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    Yes 46mm,woudnt it be nice if all cam manufactars used the same thread size,DSLRs could have their own,no hope though all cams have different specs sensor sizes lenses etc so even camcorders of the same make have different size filter threads.
     
  6. 12harry

    12harry
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    A while back Nikon attempted to standardise on 52mm - but that was before long-zooms . . . and apertures on the most expensive glass has gone up (sports picture demand?) . . . so again there is really no standard, which is a shame as we are having to buy filters that they may only need a few times, (like Starburst, fog etc.)....several times to suit our collection of lenses.

    The Cokin system overcomes this by using large acrylic squares, but these are more likely to become dirty IMHO and their larger size makes them somewhat "difficult" -
     

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