I'm about to buy my first Receiver, how complicated are they to use ?

Coke

Novice Member
Okay about to buy and I got all my items in the cart from Best Buy and Amazon. But I have a final questions before buying. So like I said I just want to hook up everything and just use and enjoy. My question is how easy is it to use the a Denon receiver ? I'll be getting the Denon S750H by the way.

Basically there's two settings I use most often and they are treble and bass. Years ago I had a Sony stereo and it had a separate knob for both treble and bass and actually my car has settings for them too and easy to use. I know Denon's doesn't have knobs for those two settings and probably no receiver does these days. Can I easily access these with the remote quickly and easily ? I don't want to go through 50 settings for different frequencies and such and fiddle for hours. It's like I don't want to have to read the 200+ manual or come here and make a new topic asking how do I decrease bass (for example). If there is a different receiver that's easier to use please suggest it.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Once you get the amp and connect all the speakers and to your TV by HDMI you have to run Audyssey with the supplied mic. It's easy, there is a wizard there that will walk you through the set up. I cannot think of an AV amp that is as easy to set up as those from Denon and Marantz.

There are no treble or bass controls on your model although those higher tier Denon models do all for adjustment of both. If you have a 5.1 speaker set up then your subwoofer will be used for bass and Audyssey is pretty good at integrating the subwoofer into the whole system.
 

razy60

Well-known Member
They can be pretty much plug and play, if you place your speakers in the correct position you then use the supplied mic to run a calibration and job done, if however you then want to get a bit more technical you can.
 

Coke

Novice Member
Quoting gibbsy:
"There are no treble or bass controls on your model although those higher tier Denon models do all for adjustment of both"


How can a $550 Receiver not have separate treble and bass settings ? It's almost unacceptable to me. I know I'm a noob but it sounds strange to me.

I don't want to rely on just Audyssey, plus I've read that's it's not always correct. I want to let my own ears decide if I need to adjust treble and bass as I see fit. Even if Audyssey works out who says I won't want to adjust settings manual afterwards. It sounds almost like Audyssey has the last say on settings.

By the way is "Audyssey" and "room correction" two separate things or are they the same thing ?

Which Receivers would allow for easy separate treble and bass adjustments ?
 

Coke

Novice Member
They can be pretty much plug and play, if you place your speakers in the correct position you then use the supplied mic to run a calibration and job done, if however you then want to get a bit more technical you can.
If you place in correct position but how can I know for sure, according to the other poster you can't adjust those settings with the S750H. I'm not buying anything now until I got this figured out.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Au
By the way is "Audyssey" and "room correction" two separate things or are they the same thing ?
Audyssey is room EQ software and your model has the basic form on board. Models from the X3700 upwards have the top tier XT32. As for bass and treble controls being absent then even expensive stereo amps forego these controls. People do enjoy adjustment but it's rare on AV amps and has to be looked for on quality stereo amps.

I don't use bass control on my high end Denon nor my Rega stereo amp. Not needed.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
If you place in correct position but how can I know for sure, according to the other poster you can't adjust those settings with the S750H. I'm not buying anything now until I got this figured out.
Audyssey has nothing to do with bass and treble controls. You have to place the mic in the main listening position at a seated head height. This is the most important measurement that Audyssey will take as it measures timing and distances from the speakers to the listener so that a reference sound arrives at 75dB.

The other readings, taken within 60cm of that first position then takes into account the effect your room has on the performance of both amp and speakers and makes the necessary adjustments. You cannot alter bass or treble within Audyssey. Audyssey integrates the subwoofer into the system for a bass response with a 75dB level responding to room pressure.
 

Coke

Novice Member
Au

Audyssey is room EQ software and your model has the basic form on board. Models from the X3700 upwards have the top tier XT32. As for bass and treble controls being absent then even expensive stereo amps forego these controls. People do enjoy adjustment but it's rare on AV amps and has to be looked for on quality stereo amps.

I don't use bass control on my high end Denon nor my Rega stereo amp. Not needed.
Okay I get what your about Audyssey. So if I get the S750H is there any point of even using Audyssey cause on S750H it's very basic level ?
 

gibbsy

Moderator
You can run the Denon without using Audyssey but it is designed to work effectively with a 5.1 system and for that it does a very good job. I don't know how good your room is acoustically. Does it have soft furnishings and carpeted floor with curtains on the windows or is the room bare with a lot of reflective surfaces. If you have the latter then Audyssey will go some way to helping the acoustics of the room improve.

If you just want the Denon for a stereo purposes with an emphasis on music then you have picked the wrong amp. I'm fishing in the dark here as you've not said what speakers you are going to use and for what purpose you want the amp.
 

Coke

Novice Member
Yes I'm getting a 5.1 with Polk signature speakers and HTS 12 sub and yes soft furnishings and carpeted floor with curtains on the windows. 17x17 room with vaulted ceilings. But I will listen to music too.

On the back of the amp it has two dials one for volume and one for low pass. I'm assuming that the volume on the sub means direct control over the bass output.

But that still leaves no way to adjust the treble if I need too. It boggles my mind that Receivers don't have these controls. There's something I'm not getting here. Say I decide to not use Audyssey then how will adjust then manually ?
 
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gibbsy

Moderator
I would recommend you run Audyssey. After doing so then set all your speakers to small with crossovers set no lower than the roll off detected by Audyssey. If lower than 80hz then set them to that. Your sub should have it's crossover set to it's maximum. All frequencies below 80hz will then be sent to the sub. It's known as bass management. These are the only adjustments that need to be made.

I don't know how important music is to you and you should have tried, or can still do, to audition the Denon. Music is really important to me and I don't consider Denon AV amps, even some of their higher end models such as I have, as being very good for stereo music. However it all depends on your expectations.

With regards to running Audyssey and bass management then you should read the opening to this excellent thread by one of our members.

 

wiz

Distinguished Member
+1 what Gibbsy said
Do research and when you bring it home read the manual, then read it again because you didn't read it properly. Then come on here and ask your questions ( I count myself in this category)
 

Coke

Novice Member
Buying first then hoping for the best afterwards isn't reassuring to me. What I will do and wish I would have done first before asking questions is download the manual and study it. Sorry if I'm asking a lot of questions but I've done probably close to 20-30 hours of research on what to get and reading reviews about receivers and speakers and feel like I still don't understand how things will work out in the end now. I was really hoping to just hook everything together and be done with it. I've been told that I can do that but, but I want my sound to be good as possible. That is what worries me. I've got other hobbies in my life and I feel this new one is taking a lot of time so far. Plus I'll be spending around $1600.
 

Theo Maxtible

Well-known Member
A simple answer to your question, is that they are - in my experience - simple to use. Yes, by very nature that you are using a piece of kit that amplifies at least 6 channels (in the case of 5.1), things are more complicated than a stereo (2-channel) amplifier, but they are not that difficult to deal with/set up. I bought my first one (Yamaha) in in about 2000, and I had very little idea what I was getting myself into. I'm on my second one now (Arcam) approaching 15 years ago, but I do have experience of assisting my brother setting up his Denon AVR about 4 years ago (I think). Like gibby says, it's dead simple and very user-friendly. All graphics were on screen, and using the microphone/Audessy set-up, was so easy. In comparison, my Arcam (bought 2006) AVR was set up using a tape measure and on-screen diagram/info not too dissimilar to MS-DOS days!

Invest as much time in researching as the purchase price means to you. I spent months (not every day, admittedly) researching my Arcam DV137 player and AVR in 2006 before ddeciding to purchase - and perhaps more importantly - attended two demos in a dealer's premises before deciding to take the plunge. Purchase price was getting on for £3000. I do not have bass or treble controls - sound I get is sublime.
 

kbfern

Distinguished Member
If you want tonal control of your speakers you can get that if you go up slightly in the Denon range. The X1600 which was a slightly older model but still available here in the UK but maybe not in the US has this option.


The lowest model in the current range is the X2700 which will also do this but costs more.

Amazon product
 
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Coke

Novice Member
If you want tonal control of your speakers you can get that if you go up slightly in the Denon range. The X1600 which was a slightly older model but still available here in the UK but maybe not in the US has this option.


The lowest model in the current range is the X2700 which will also do this but costs more.

Amazon product
Come to find out that that other brands like Yamaha and Onkyo have treble and bass settings, I think its more common then originally thought.
 
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Coke

Novice Member
DRA-800H (2019) Stereo Network Receiver AV Receivers | Denon

I never saw this till like 20mins ago. It also has sub hookups too. I like this unit.

So do you do think the Polk sig floor standers S55 would still be a great option for this unit ? They should provide enough bass.

Or maybe get the Polk sig S15 bookshelf speakers but with a subwoofer. The money saved from not buying the floor standers could be put to buying a subwoofer. What do you think ?
 
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kbfern

Distinguished Member

So are you now only wanting a 2.1 setup, if so the 800H is ok but will not do any of the decoding of DTS Master Audio DTS X or Dolby HD Audio and Atmos on any bluray or streamed content.

It does however have knobs for adjusting tone.

As pointed out earlier the X1600 is still available in your market and at $100 more can do all the codecs and can do 2.1 up to 5.2 as it has 7 channels of amplification. It will do tone control but no knob and tone control is accessed via on screen graphic equalizer.
 

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