If you primarily watch content in a dark room OLED is not a big step forward. Maybe even a step backwards.

OLEDed

Standard Member
EDIT:

I wanted to edit this post after having spent more time with the sets. After researching online the near black blocky artifacts seem to be a common but intermittent issue. Apparently it's a combination of TV performance and input signal. I am finding that it is not as bad as I initially thought. I've watched several movies with dark scenes without seeing it. These sets do have other minor near black difficulties but I no longer feel it's a deal breaker because it seems to be infrequent.






I wanted to post this here as someone who just switched from a Panasonic VT60 to a LG CX and C9 (bedroom set). OLED has a huge achilles heel, near black performance. On both my CX and C9 it's a big issue. On near black scenes the sets get block like artifacts on the screen. It really pulls you out of the moment because you start expecting it and looking for it.

I really have no other complaints about OLED. Even the motion handling is fine 90% of the time. They are bright and do have a very similar feel to plasma.

The near black issue in my opinion is a big deal and I'm not seeing a dramatic difference between 1080p and 4k HDR in a dark room. A good plasma at 1080p will look just about as good as a OLED at 4k. Day time viewing is a different story. The extra brightness of OLED makes a big difference.

If you are on the fence and primarily watch in dark room think twice before going OLED. Maybe some of the other brands do near blacks better than LG.
 
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mikej

Well-known Member
To be fair, those particular LG OLED models are known for having issues with near-black performance in certain dark scenes but I thought these scenes were supposed to be 'torture tests', used by reviewers to highlight any flaws - are you really seeing that kind of behaviour during dark scenes in all content ?

I've never seen any distracting near-black flashing / pixelation / artefacts in dark scenes (from good quality sources/streams) on my Panasonic GZ950, so the issue doesn't appear to be common to - or at least as noticeable on - all OLEDs. Judging by the HDTVTest video, this is also less of an issue with this year's LG C1 when compared with the older LG models.

With regards to HDR, I find that the biggest difference comes with the brighter elements of a scene which can be eye-wateringly bright at times and very noticeably brighter than 1080p SDR on either an OLED or plasma, both during the day and during night-time viewing.

I tend to do most of my viewing in a dark room in the evenings and, while I was (admittedly) forced to upgrade when my previous plasma failed, I have no regrets about choosing OLED. One other big benefit for me was moving to a larger screen size but I think if I had something like a 65" VT60/65 plasma which was still working, then the decision to upgrade/switch to OLED would have been a lot harder ! :)
 

OLEDed

Standard Member
To be fair, those particular LG OLED models are known for having issues with near-black performance in certain dark scenes but I thought these scenes were supposed to be 'torture tests', used by reviewers to highlight any flaws - are you really seeing that kind of behaviour during dark scenes in all content ?

I've never seen any distracting near-black flashing / pixelation / artefacts in dark scenes (from good quality sources/streams) on my Panasonic GZ950, so the issue doesn't appear to be common to - or at least as noticeable on - all OLEDs. Judging by the HDTVTest video, this is also less of an issue with this year's LG C1 when compared with the older LG models.

With regards to HDR, I find that the biggest difference comes with the brighter elements of a scene which can be eye-wateringly bright at times and very noticeably brighter than 1080p SDR on either an OLED or plasma, both during the day and during night-time viewing.

I tend to do most of my viewing in a dark room in the evenings and, while I was (admittedly) forced to upgrade when my previous plasma failed, I have no regrets about choosing OLED. One other big benefit for me was moving to a larger screen size but I think if I had something like a 65" VT60/65 plasma which was still working, then the decision to upgrade/switch to OLED would have been a lot harder ! :)
I updated my post.
 

OLEDed

Standard Member
To be fair, those particular LG OLED models are known for having issues with near-black performance in certain dark scenes but I thought these scenes were supposed to be 'torture tests', used by reviewers to highlight any flaws - are you really seeing that kind of behaviour during dark scenes in all content ?

I've never seen any distracting near-black flashing / pixelation / artefacts in dark scenes (from good quality sources/streams) on my Panasonic GZ950, so the issue doesn't appear to be common to - or at least as noticeable on - all OLEDs. Judging by the HDTVTest video, this is also less of an issue with this year's LG C1 when compared with the older LG models.

With regards to HDR, I find that the biggest difference comes with the brighter elements of a scene which can be eye-wateringly bright at times and very noticeably brighter than 1080p SDR on either an OLED or plasma, both during the day and during night-time viewing.

I tend to do most of my viewing in a dark room in the evenings and, while I was (admittedly) forced to upgrade when my previous plasma failed, I have no regrets about choosing OLED. One other big benefit for me was moving to a larger screen size but I think if I had something like a 65" VT60/65 plasma which was still working, then the decision to upgrade/switch to OLED would have been a lot harder ! :)
OLED is great and overall a step forward for sure but not the giant leap forward like some proclaim. People often exaggerate. In a dark room quality 1080p content on a high quality plasma will look just about as good as HDR 4k on a OLED if they are both calibrated. It's not a night and day difference. Of course there are exceptions to every rule. Day time viewing is where OLED smokes plasma but even OLED can be a bit on the dim side in a bright room with blinds open. As it turns out I do like my OLEDs despite that initial scare. It's actually nice not having a heater running all year!
 

SimonST

Distinguished Member
In a dark room quality 1080p content on a high quality plasma will look just about as good as HDR 4k on a OLED if they are both calibrated. It's not a night and day difference

1080p SDR on a plasma vs 1080p SDR on an OLED, yes, the difference isn't always "night and day", and some purists may prefer watching 1080p content on a 1080p display where no upscaling is required, in which case, a top-end Plasma is still a great choice with attributes perfect for SDR, provided you are watching in dark viewing conditions.

But to suggest 1080p SDR on a plasma is "almost as good" as 4K HDR on an OLED is disingenuous, it's a huge difference, regardless of viewing conditions.
 
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OLEDed

Standard Member
1080p SDR on a plasma vs 1080p SDR on an OLED, yes, the difference isn't always "night and day", and some purists may prefer watching 1080p content on a 1080p display where no upscaling is required, in which case, a top-end Plasma is still a great choice with attributes perfect for SDR, provided you are watching in dark viewing conditions.

But to suggest 1080p SDR on a plasma is "almost as good" as 4K HDR on an OLED is disingenuous, it's a huge difference, regardless of viewing conditions.
I don't see a huge difference at all but I have only streamed content so far. I will go farther and say on my 65" screens the differences between 4k and 1080p at my viewing distance of about 13' are basically indistinguishable. None of us see a big difference. I like the OLED better, especially for daytime but in a dark room the gap closes greatly.
 

cydavidho

Active Member
I don't see a huge difference at all but I have only streamed content so far. I will go farther and say on my 65" screens the differences between 4k and 1080p at my viewing distance of about 13' are basically indistinguishable. None of us see a big difference. I like the OLED better, especially for daytime but in a dark room the gap closes greatly.
Glad to hear plasma 1080p quality is good, even when comparing to OLED 4k content in a dark room condition. I mainly watch movie at night, I am one of those who plan to continue using my calibrated Panasonic plasma in the living room for the next 10 years or until the day it dies. :)
 

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