if we lose physical media, we'll lose ownership of movies!!!

HMTB

Well-known Member
The argument that streaming quality doesn't compete with discs simply doesn't wash.

i'm big into physical media but that's because I love artwork/ownership and all that archaic jazz. However, I've watched UHD streams of plenty of films I own on disc and I struggle to notice any difference.

Personally, i hate 'owning' stuff digitally & that's why I'll always buy physical. It is somewhat frustrating seeing certain other physical media advocates harping on about the quality differences though. If you've got a decent TV/setup then that simply isn't a factor...
I much much prefer physical media to streaming and I do think disc quality is better than what I get on Netflix or Amazon Prime or Disney Plus or Sky HD. I mainly watch discs for probably 80% of my viewing and the rest, when I watch films with my wife, they're on Sky or a streaming service (not high quality iTunes downloads or anything like that). I don't find streaming or Sky hard to watch, it does seem pretty good despite the fact that I think discs look better.

However, I like buying and collecting films, making a decision to buy titles and then watch them rather that looking through 4 libraries to see what's on (though i could do this in advance, create a watchlist on each platform and just get through them that way). I don't, however, buy digital films.

The value of streaming is pretty impressive in terms of the amount of stuff you get and even with renting on Amazon Prime, it makes much more sense than spending £15 for a film you may only watch once or twice. However, this is a hobby, passion or interest and financial logic isn't really the driving factor.
 

Buckster666

Well-known Member
The concern I have is the "woke" mob that cries about everything being a ism, and content is then removed.

Netflix for example have removed a number of episodes from Community and it's always sunny in philadelphia, and Disney have digitally censored Splash, used the dubbed soundtrack on Adventures in Babysitting to remove bad language and removed one of the outtakes from Toy Story 2.
 

Bottlebrush

Active Member
The concern I have is the "woke" mob that cries about everything being a ism, and content is then removed.

Netflix for example have removed a number of episodes from Community and it's always sunny in philadelphia, and Disney have digitally censored Splash, used the dubbed soundtrack on Adventures in Babysitting to remove bad language and removed one of the outtakes from Toy Story 2.
Yes, revisionism is one of the many reasons I decided to build myself a collection of my favourite films. Alongside quality of image, sound, availability in the event of internet outage, choice of version, extras. Still plenty of reasons to go physical and many were bought second hand, so cheap to boot!
 

HMTB

Well-known Member
The concern I have is the "woke" mob that cries about everything being a ism, and content is then removed.

Netflix for example have removed a number of episodes from Community and it's always sunny in philadelphia, and Disney have digitally censored Splash, used the dubbed soundtrack on Adventures in Babysitting to remove bad language and removed one of the outtakes from Toy Story 2.
I've been watching Fawlty Towers on Netflix recently and that seems to still exist uncensored on there.

I also fairly recently bought the new remastered 1990 Total Recall disc on blu ray and that began with a warning about the possible suffering I might endure due to the offensive nature of the content. I still have no idea which part of the film that was referring to.
 
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Tim2049

Well-known Member
I've been watching Fawlty Towers on Netflix recently and that seems to still exist uncensored on there.

I also fairly recently bought the new remastered 1990 Total Recall disc on blu ray and that began with a warning about the possible suffering I might endure due to the offensive nature of the content. I still have no idea which part of the film that was referring to.

Women with three boobs don't really exist. I find that moderately offensive..
 

zantarous

Distinguished Member
The concern I have is the "woke" mob that cries about everything being a ism, and content is then removed.
This practise has been around for far longer

For example the BBC refused to broadcast two 3 episodes of the original Star Trek show as they were deemed unsuitable for British audiences. They finally got aired in the very late 80s when Sky got their hands on it.

DS9 also had a issue with a episode that depicted a homosexual kiss, can't remember if the BBC never aired it or did a special late night run.

Violence was often toned down by UK broadcasters to fit things into silly timeslots. There are loads of examples in the US as well, Family Guy and the abortion episode either didn't get shown or has never been shown since and is missing from D+. One of the for mentioned Star Trek episodes (the kiss between Kirk and Uhura) was too much for the South and most affiliates in the region refused to air it.

The only way to see things fully as they were originally intended is by physical media (but even then we are let to believe that Han did not shoot first)!

The difference now is instead of a small number of people deciding what is deemed offensive it is society's voice that is now speaking out.
 

Alien8

Active Member
The concern I have is the "woke" mob that cries about everything being a ism, and content is then removed.

Netflix for example have removed a number of episodes from Community and it's always sunny in philadelphia, and Disney have digitally censored Splash, used the dubbed soundtrack on Adventures in Babysitting to remove bad language and removed one of the outtakes from Toy Story 2.

I recently bought Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em on DVD from Spain because it's censored here. And will be keeping my old blu-ray copy of Toy Story 2 for above reasons. I always thought of myself as a liberal (with a small 'L'), but the far-left extremists seem to have distorted the landscape so much I'm now perceived as being pushed to the right of centre without having moved.

John Cleese issues mock apology for Monty Python

The difference now is instead of a small number of people deciding what is deemed offensive it is society's voice that is now speaking out.

It's not society as a whole. It's a small but vocal minority of weirdos on Twitter who seem to have the ear of the media. (I also refer to the case of the never-to-be-released Tom & Jerry: Golden Collection, Volume Two Blu-ray.)
 

zantarous

Distinguished Member
It's not society as a whole. It's a small but vocal minority of weirdos on Twitter who seem to have the ear of the media. (I also refer to the case of the never-to-be-released Tom & Jerry: Golden Collection, Volume Two Blu-ray.)
I am not going to label anyone a weirdo, cause if you listen to their core argument there is actually some merit to it, taking down content maybe extreme but you can still buy it if you want it and that is the important thing. And that is exactly what I did for 30 Rock and It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

30 Rocks looks great in Blu-ray and that soundstage in DTS HD MA sounds great. Team Blu-ray!!!!
 

davidf

Previously davidf
.
While we (physical media fans) can't hold back the inevitable streaming future, there are still enough out there so that even if major studio's do ditch physical media production themselves, they will still see sufficient $ in licensing out to boutique firms to make limited special edition runs. So yes, we may find a time when the next generic mid-budget thriller from WB or Universal isn't released on physical media, but that the more boutique-friendly titles (which frankly are the ones I want to own on physical media anyway) are, via Arrow, 88 Films, Eureka, Shout Factory, et al.
This is my only hope for the future of physical media. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve watched a film on Netflix/Prime/Mubi etc only to find the quality is dismal - either due to using some poor master of a film, or the limiting quality by the provider. I don’t mind so much for something like comedies, particularly as most are set in daylight, and streaming isn’t too bad with light scenes, but if you’re big into thrillers and horrors, which have a lot of dark scenes, streaming services just don’t have the bandwidth to cope, and you end up with grey rather than black, and bands of gradation in these dark areas.

With streaming services, we also have to endure cut versions of films. A few years ago I watched Scott Speigel’s 1989 slasher Intruder, which I’d always avoided, thinking it was a cheap and nasty horror, based on the cover. My brother loaned me his 88 Films Bluray of it, and really enjoyed it. Some time later I felt like watching it again, and noticed it was on Shudder (a dedicated horror channel), and about a third the way through I was wondering why it wasn’t bowling me over like the first time. I then realised that much of the actual horror had been cut out - it was a cut version of the film with about 5 minutes missing. This cut version was exactly what I thought the film was going to be when I was avoiding it! So the lesson there, is, you can’t even trust dedicated genre streaming services. Unless you research, you’ll never know if what you’re watching has been cut.

Once movie studios have done away with physical media, we will all have no choice but to rent, and at that point, they control the content - they’ll be able to remove what they like, when they like. They’ll be able to remove access to any films in their catalogue, and it’s possible they may never see the light of day again.

And this could affect the future of home theatre - if we end up in a society where we can only rent compressed HD and UHD movies, how likely are people to invest in serious home theatre systems? You could argue that the compressed streams might become the norm and we’ll get used to it, but unless cloud streaming massively improves in the meantime, you’re not going to invest in a £10k product or for such quality.

One ray of hope recently was the release of the remastered version of the 1953 War Of The Worlds, released on Criterion bluray. Watching the exras, it was good to see a representative lf Paramount going through the remastering process, and stating that they felt it important to treat this important release with the care and attention it deserved. Stunning looking Bluray, and I can only hope it’ll get a UHD release at some point.

On the flip side, I now have about 3 or 4 Icon Distribution films that no player will recognise (only as “BD Data”), despite being no more than 10-15 years old. I’ve tried reaching out to the company, but got nothing back yet. Based on that, I’d recommend at least backing up your Icon discs…
 
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lgans316

Distinguished Member
Women with three boobs don't really exist. I find that moderately offensive..

I was of the same impression until I watched the incessant coverage of Demi Rose in DailyMail lol :)
 

Buckster666

Well-known Member
I was of the same impression until I watched the incessant coverage of Demi Rose in DailyMail lol :)
Demi rose

8b62962a32d7b05dd004d8ae906ef8c5.png
 

IGC

Well-known Member
Another thing about a streaming-only lifestyle, I had 900MBPS FTTP installed last year and -horror of horrors- dropped a picture frame on the incoming box and knocked it off the wall shattering the glass fibre cable I assume. Looked OK and I put it back together but it was borked :eek:

I had to wait 7 days for them to do the repair and luckily with COVID Vodafone were doing unlimited 4G data that month but I still used 250GB in those 7 days. All that time I was being very careful too just in case Vodafone cut off the data early. Well horrible. I turned an old Windows laptop into a access point so everything worked well albeit at a reduced 35MBPS (not pretty when I'm used to at least 150MBPS).

No good data = nothing works. Not much on council TV nowadays.

I've since boxed in the OpenReach fibre box which is really small and there was no real way of protecting the cable as it's curled in a ring before entering the box -they need to rethink that.

I also moved to 3 with an unlimted 4G/5G SIM plan just as a backup (using virtually nothing maybe 50mb a month in the last 6 months so it's an expensive backup but worth it).

I watched lots of discs that week :D
 

Drax1

Distinguished Member
 

IGC

Well-known Member
That's interesting and I'm sure most of us relate to it but there is no "slow demise". Streaming is rocket-fuelled and habit forming. It's the crack-cocaine of video watching.

Apple Inc offered $600,000,000 ($600 million) to stream the latest Bond for just 12 months and Eon said no so MGM (Eon's partner) went off in the huff and sold itself to Amazon yesterday for $8,500,000,000 (8.5 billion). Apple had offered $5-$6bn last year before asking for the Bond rights. Amazon seemed to have over paid but I reckon they got a bargain and one good thing for me is MGM has some proper protection longterm.

The people behind Eon love cinemas, press junkets and pressed discs however they also like 007 branded jigsaw puzzles, shampoo, plastic toys ie they'll follow the money (or their children/estates will).

I'm in it until things end (sounds like a Barry White song).
 

davidf

Previously davidf
I see that two episodes of Spongebob Squarepants have been removed from streaming services due to their content. Not a big deal to most of us, but this is another aspect of physical media that wins out for the end user - if you own it, they can’t take it away from you or change it while it’s in your possession. Even “buying” from streaming services only really allows you to stream it when you want, but it can still be altered, or even removed.
 

Marv

Member
Just gives the Studios more control as to what we can watch and gives them card blanche to edit old episodes or just remove them.
 

MovieMadUK

Standard Member
I really hope DVD's, Bluray's and 4k bluray's will remain for the foreseeable future, we all know streaming is the norm (I stream), but people forget you don't own the content, it's on demand to access while its available, even if you make digital purchases their not secure ownership and can be removed.

Physical is safer then in the cloud, ok discs could be damaged, lost, stolen etc but even if their out of print you still have other copies in circulation, used or new old stock. It may be hard for rare or limited editions but still.

My concern is the big movie outlets especially walt disney (who now own 20th century) along with the others will hold the vaults to ransom meaning once they ditch discs all together other outlets and distributors won't be able to buy licences and rights thus killing off collectors and those who prefer actual hard copies.
I have a google play library of approx 800 films, they have removed their app from all my TV’s and streaming boxes and basically told me tough luck. After losing 100 movies during the flixster shut down i will never buy digital again until we atleast have a movies Anywhere type service in the UK. Its ridiculous the US has had it for almost 3 years and still nothing in the UK
 

zantarous

Distinguished Member
I have a google play library of approx 800 films, they have removed their app from all my TV’s and streaming boxes and basically told me tough luck. After losing 100 movies during the flixster shut down i will never buy digital again until we atleast have a movies Anywhere type service in the UK. Its ridiculous the US has had it for almost 3 years and still nothing in the UK
You should still be able to watch via YouTube on your TV
 

MovieMadUK

Standard Member
You should still be able to watch via YouTube on your TV
I know but have you tried browsing your library on you tube, especially when you have 800 titles.

it only puts them in date added order and no other way to sort them.

what happens if google de

i currently have 800 on Google 250 on Rakuten 50 on Itunes and about 30 on Sky Store.

not buying anymore digital, it will do for renting but going back to physical from now on.
 

zantarous

Distinguished Member
I know but have you tried browsing your library on you tube, especially when you have 800 titles.

it only puts them in date added order and no other way to sort them.

what happens if google de

i currently have 800 on Google 250 on Rakuten 50 on Itunes and about 30 on Sky Store.

not buying anymore digital, it will do for renting but going back to physical from now on.
My digital library is tiny, it only has the films that I got codes for with actual discs, but yes you are right the browsing feature on YouTube is horrendous. This was evidently clear when they launched YouTube Red, no synopsis, no more info panel, just click and play movie and usually in stereo.

Blur-ray/4K all the way.
 

MovieMadUK

Standard Member
My digital library is tiny, it only has the films that I got codes for with actual discs, but yes you are right the browsing feature on YouTube is horrendous. This was evidently clear when they launched YouTube Red, no synopsis, no more info panel, just click and play movie and usually in stereo.

Blur-ray/4K all the way.
Had my fingers burnt too many times by digital now, its convenient for plane journeys but its physical for me from now on. I have started buying the discs from ebay for what i used to have on Digital.
 

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zantarous

Distinguished Member
Had my fingers burnt too many times by digital now, its convenient for plane journeys but its physical for me from now on. I have started buying the discs from ebay for what i used to have on Digital.
I am very envious of all that shelf space. If you have the time, money and know how you can still have a digital library that you can create from your discs.

Also any device running Android/Google TV will still have a Google Play app for video.
 

Cevolution

Well-known Member
The argument that streaming quality doesn't compete with discs simply doesn't wash.

You're right, particularly for titles that are distributed on disc by different studios/distributors over multiple territories. It's not uncommon for the quality of disc versions to vastly vary in these situations. There are plenty of titles released on Blu-ray disc all over the world, that are poor in one or more territories but not all, that you could be put up against some streaming versions, where the streaming version may come out on top.

Plenty of disc enthusiasts can't evaluate a disc on their own without being told there is an issue or what to look for from reading reviews... They read that one version is good, and they assume that the one that they have bought is the same.
 

wilson85uk

Standard Member
I use streaming service myself for accessing content like millions of others but when it comes to actual ownership, I'll never buy digitally such as on amazon prime.

I had several digital codes with some Bluray's but they died when Ultraviolet closed but at least I still have the actual disc copies.

These are two long out of print titles I own which are virtually impossible to find, P2 I've seen on ebay listed for prices like £40-50. I only paid £3.99 for my copy from a sensible seller. Run I bought new from amazon many years ago and it was out of print then, new old stock.
 

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