If My Receiver Doesn’t Support 4K Upscaling But My Blu-Ray Plater Does ...

amityeric

Novice Member
I have the Sony X800M2 which supports 4K upscaling but the Onkyo 830 which doesn’t. So are my movies being upscaled? Thanks for any feedback.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Let your TV do the upscaling. If it didn't then the screen would not be filled with the image and have black bars all around. Connect the player by one HDMI direct to the TV for video and the second to the receiver for audio. The player will automatically output 4K when you play a 4K disc.
 

amityeric

Novice Member
Hmmmm. The receiver can handle 4k. Right now I have the Blu-Ray player connected via hdmi to the receiver. Then I have the receiver connected to the tv via an hdmi cable. Everything is attached into the receiver first then only one hdmi to the TV. Wii, Nintendo Switch, Blu-Ray player all right into the receiver. I had someone set it up for me but I don’t know if it’s right. When they set it up, they also used an optical cable from the receiver to the TV. I wasn’t sure why they did that or if it was needed.

Are you saying it’s better to bypass the receiver for the video?

And my original question was whether the BluRay upscaling would be stopped by the receiver since I read that the receiver didn’t support 4K upscaling.

Ugh. I’m so confused.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
There's no need to use either the player or your AV receiver to scale video up. Simply output video at its native resolution, allowing the AV receiver to pass it through unadulterated and let the TV scale it to fit its panel if required.

The video scaling incorporated into AV receivers are no more capable than those employed onboard TVs. THe same goes for the scalers you get with source devices.

If the AVR can pass the resolution a source has been configured to scale its output up to then there shouldn't be an issue passing the scaled video through said AV receiver. The absence of a scaler onboard the receiver simply means that it cannot be used to scale video and it doesn;t prevent it from handling or passing through video scaled by another device connected to it as long as the resulting video complies with the AV receiver's capabilities.
 

amityeric

Novice Member
So basically what I hearing is “don’t worry about it.” Just out of curiosity though, with my setup, is the Blu-ray player doing the upscaling ... or the TV?

And is my setup OK (Blu-ray to receiver via HDMI, then receiver to TV via HDMI) or should I do as Gibbsy state’s and run one HDMI from the Blu-ray player to the receiver for audio, and another direct from the Blu-ray player to the TV for video?
 

mjbtin

Well-known Member
The only reason to use both hdmis on the Sony is if the receiver will not pass through 4khdr/dolby vision.Your receiver does so Sony to Onkyo to tv:smashin:

Martin
 

amityeric

Novice Member
thank you everyone for the help!

I haven’t even watched my first 4K disc yet. I can’t wait to try it. I’m afraid my old HDMI cables won’t cut it!
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
thank you everyone for the help!

I haven’t even watched my first 4K disc yet. I can’t wait to try it. I’m afraid my old HDMI cables won’t cut it!
There's no requirement for new cables in order to be able to stream 4K UHD unless the cables in question are very old or poor quality. Any cable rated HIGH SPEED should suffice.
 

amityeric

Novice Member
Hmmm. Thanks. So here’s another question. Since my Sony Blu-ray player does upscaling, and it sends its signal through the receiver to the TV, and the TV also does upscaling, which device is doing it? The Blu-Ray player or the TV?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Hmmm. Thanks. So here’s another question. Since my Sony Blu-ray player does upscaling, and it sends its signal through the receiver to the TV, and the TV also does upscaling, which device is doing it? The Blu-Ray player or the TV?
If the resolution of the video going into the TV already matches the resolution of its panel then the TV wouldn't need to scale it so wouldn't scale it. If the incoming video is of a lesser resolution than the TV's panel then the TV would automatically scale it up to fill that panel. THe TV would also automatically deinterlace interlaced video sources because flat panel TVs cannot display interlaced video. If the source is a Blu-ray player then the video will more than likely be progressive as opposed to interlaced anyway.
 

amityeric

Novice Member
If the resolution of the video going into the TV already matches the resolution of its panel then the TV wouldn't need to scale it so wouldn't scale it. If the incoming video is of a lesser resolution than the TV's panel then the TV would automatically scale it up to fill that panel. THe TV would also automatically deinterlace interlaced video sources because flat panel TVs cannot display interlaced video. If the source is a Blu-ray player then the video will more than likely be progressive as opposed to interlaced anyway.
 
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