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If modem is ideal solution for residential CPE deployment should it work on a network

Comer

Established Member
I recently bought an ADSL modem and it doesn't seem to be suitable to use on a home network as it is a DHCP server that only supports one PC. It will only assign an IP address to one PC on the network. This means that if I use dynamic IP adresses only one PC gets an IP address and the others will not join the network, if I use static IP addresses, none of the PCs can access the Internet.

I have spen quite some time onto the modem support section and they have confirmed that it can only be used with one PC. On the modem box it states that the modem "Provides ideal solution for home or small business networks." The support manager agreed with me that this statement is false and that I should return the modem to my supplier. However the supplier (dabs.ie) say that the modem was not falsely advertised and it's my problem. The modem was advertised on the dabs.ie site as "It is an ideal solution for residential or small business CPE deployments." (I assume that CPE is customer premises equipment). My question is, is this the same as saying that the modem provides ideal solution for home and business networks.

Any opinions greatly appreciated.
 

Badger0-0

Distinguished Member
Surely a network is more than one computer?
If it only supports one, I'd suggest it's been mis-sold and I'd give Trading standards a bell.
 

Comer

Established Member
Thanks Badger, I agree completely. It's down to what they advertised the modem as. If "CPE deployment" means "network" (I don't know as I'm not familiar with the phrase), then I think I am right in saying that the product does not live up to this promise.

It's only €50, but why should they get away with it if they are wrong.
 

Badger0-0

Distinguished Member
I must admit, "CPE" is new to me too.

I was wondering though, if there's any reference to it requiring a router or similar?
If there is, you're stuffed, IMO.
 

Comer

Established Member
"The DM111P ADSL2+ Ethernet Modem supports a full range of ADSL standards, including ADSL2+, enabling service providers to attract more customers through greater reach and higher performance. G.Lite, ADSL, ADSL2, and ADSL2+ support ensures compatibility with most DSL networks. It is an ideal solution for residential or small business CPE deployments"

That is the description given for the modem on the Dabs site.
 

Chris Muriel

Distinguished Member
CPE is industry marketing gobbledygook for Customer Premises Equipment (i.e. the consumer end of the ADSL "network"); it's complement is CO (Central Office) which refers to the telephone exchange end where the DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer) sits.
They really shouldn't use these internal industry acronyms when pitching at Joe Public.

Chris Muriel, Boston (normally Manchester)
 
S

stratagem

Guest
If you bought this recently via the Internet, as a consumer and not as a business, ie. a personal purchase, you have every right under distance selling regulations to return it for any reason regardless of it's fitness for purpose.

You can simply change your mind.
 

Comer

Established Member
You need to plug it into a router, a switch won't do, using the WAN port. The router will supply DHCP for the rest of your network.[/URL]


After one and a half hours of worthless support with Netgear, they told me that this modem could not be used on a network, not even with a router :mad: , five minutes setting it up with a router and all is now working.:smashin:
 

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