I feel like ive read all the popular fantasy books available

andyUK101

Member
Or at least it feels that way, im a big fan of this genre and over the last few months havent been able to find anything to get stuck into

Ive read

Empire series - Janny Wurts
Mistwraith series - Janny Wurts
All of R E Feists books with the exception of the latest demonwar one (£18 for 350 pages!!! - ill wait for the paperback)
Tales of fire and ice - B Sanderson
Wheel of time - RR Jordan
All the Malazan tales - Esselmont, Erikson
Farseer, Madship and Tawny man series - R Hobb
Mirror series - I Irvine
Everything Pratchett has done
All the major books by D Eddings (admittedly a long time ago)
Druss, Wayfarer etc etc by D Gemell
LOTR, Hobbit etc - Tolkein
T Covenant series - S Donaldson
Most of K Kerrs early work

Im sure there is more but this is all that springs to mind

The only major series i can think of that i havent read is the Shannara series by T Brooks

Im convinced there is more out there that im missing and wondered what people would recommend
 
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digriz666

Active Member
Hi ya,
Try Michael Moorcock, Elric series, Or
Ian Irvine A View from the Mirror Series



cheers
steve
 

andyUK101

Member
Hi ya,
Try Michael Moorcock, Elric series, Or
Ian Irvine A View from the Mirror Series



cheers
steve
Cheers, ive read the mirror series, although out of order starting with the well of echoes series

Really enjoyed the well of echoes series but it went downhill with the song of the tears series and was really disappointed with destiny of the dead

Ill check out the Elric series
 

PaulieBeef

Active Member
Or at least it feels that way, im a big fan of this genre and over the last few months havent been able to find anything to get stuck into

Ive read

Empire series - Janny Wurts
Mistwraith series - Janny Wurts
All of R E Feists books with the exception of the latest demonwar one (£18 for 350 pages!!! - ill wait for the paperback)
Tales of fire and ice - B Sanderson
Wheel of time - RR Jordan
All the Malazan tales - Esselmont, Erikson
Farseer, Madship and Tawny man series - R Hobb
Mirror series - I Irvine
Everything Pratchett has done
All the major books by D Eddings (admittedly a long time ago)
Druss, Wayfarer etc etc by D Gemell
LOTR, Hobbit etc - Tolkein
T Covenant series - S Donaldson
Most of K Kerrs early work

Im sure there is more but this is all that springs to mind

The only major series i can think of that i havent read is the Shannara series by T Brooks

Im convinced there is more out there that im missing and wondered what people would recommend
I notice you haven't got George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series in your list. I'd highly recommend it - it is by far the best fantasy series I have ever read. Even my wife loves it and she normally wouldn't even dream of picking up a fantasy book!
 

Toasty

Distinguished Member
I always recommend the Song of Albion and Pendragon cycle series from Stephen Lawhead, especially if you have the slightest interest in Celtic mythology.
 

jenam93

Well-known Member
Not that I have read them but there is Stephen King's The Dark Tower series or the Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind.

On a different level there are tons of DragonLance novels which are easily readable.

I just came across The Kingkiller Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss. Only the first one is out at present, The Name of the Wind, but supposed to be really good. It'll be my next read.
 

pixelpidgeon

Distinguished Member
I have read the Dark Tower series. Really enjoyed them. Stephen King tells excellent characters, really draws you into the story in my opinion. :smashin:

Not that I have read them but there is Stephen King's The Dark Tower series or the Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind.

On a different level there are tons of DragonLance novels which are easily readable.

I just came across The Kingkiller Chronicles by Patrick Rothfuss. Only the first one is out at present, The Name of the Wind, but supposed to be really good. It'll be my next read.
 
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Joe Abercrombie's books (4 to date)
Scott Lynch
The rest of Gemmell if you have only read Druss and Waylander
.....er the ones that relate to having runes inscribed on you (Runelords?)
 

andyUK101

Member
I notice you haven't got George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series in your list. I'd highly recommend it - it is by far the best fantasy series I have ever read. Even my wife loves it and she normally wouldn't even dream of picking up a fantasy book!
Missed those off the list - have read them all and have been waiting several years for the next installment
 

andyUK101

Member
I always recommend the Song of Albion and Pendragon cycle series from Stephen Lawhead, especially if you have the slightest interest in Celtic mythology.
Not something that interests me directly but i did enjoy K Kerrs early work - the derry ones - and they had a strong celtic influence

Will check them out
 
Thats the one. I have not read the 4th book yet but really liked the premise of the runes and how powerful (and vunerable) they could be.
 

ARNOLD AKIEN

Novice Member
" Im convinced there is more out there that im missing and wondered what people would recommend "

I appreciate that you just have to be joking but, well, you could look at ...


Jim Butchers " Harry Dresden " series...


The Dresden Files are set in a "alternate" Chicago where magic is real, but only a few actually believe in it; it's a first-person tale told by an irascible wizard named Harry Dresden, who regularly gives the magical establishment indigestion — and the police, the same. Take Sam Spade, your Average Joe Underdog Action Star, and toss in some spellcraft, and you get Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden. Heck of a guy.


Jim-Butcher.Com: Books - Dresden Files


that page gives the novels but there are also short stories.


They are nothing like the TV series of The Dresden Files which was a saddly stripped down version in which only the characters names are retained from the books ..clearly the TV people wanted a magical version of The Rockford Files.

Of course theres also Butchers " Altera " series which are more toward the swords and horses type Tolkien sort of thing ..

Jim-Butcher.Com: Books - Codex Alera


At the other end of the alphabet there are Roger Zelaznys books..

you could start with " Nine Princes In Amber " ...


The Chronicles of Amber - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Lots of others just follow this ...


Roger Zelazny - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


How seriously do you want me to take this? :D


The question isn't that you have read so much fantasy but rather that you've missed so much.

No Gene Wolfe ? ...


Gene Wolfe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


" Wolfe's best-known and most highly regarded work is the multi-volume novel The Book of the New Sun. Set in a bleak, distant future influenced by Jack Vance's Dying Earth series, the story details the life of Severian, a journeyman torturer, exiled from his guild for showing compassion to one of the condemned. The novel is composed of the volumes The Shadow of the Torturer (1980), The Claw of the Conciliator (1981), winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novel, The Sword of the Lictor (1982), and The Citadel of the Autarch (1983). A coda, The Urth of the New Sun (1987), wraps up some loose ends but is generally considered a separate work. Several Wolfe essays about the writing of The Book of the New Sun were published in The Castle of the Otter (1982; the title refers to a misprint of the fourth book's title in Locus magazine)."

On Moorcock don't miss the " Dancers at the End Of Time " series but the Elric books are his sword and sorcery stories and tie in with various other ' eternal hero ' series ...


Michael Moorcock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


" Moorcock's work is frequently praised as being complex and multilayered. Central to many of his fantasy novels is the concept of an "Eternal Champion," who has potentially multiple identities across multiple dimensions of reality and alternative universes. This cosmology is called the "Multiverse" within his novels and is based on the concept which arose in particle physics in the 1960s and is still a current theory in high energy physics.

The "Eternal Champion" is engaged in a constant struggle with not only conventional notions of good and evil, but also in the struggle for balance between Law and Chaos. In a sense this reflects the idea of the "golden mean" as the ideal condition of being (Marcus Aurelius, etc). Many of Moorcock's most successful books follow this theme of promoting a dynamic stability which frees humanity (or thinking beings) from the burdens of superstition, hate and fear. The "black sword", which appears as the eternal champion's ally and/or nemesis in many of the fantasy novels, is explicitly identified as representing fear."


Then theres Larry Nivens 'Magic Goes Away " series and many of his stories are nearer to Fantasy than they are to Hardline Science Fiction ...

Larry Niven - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Or theres Ann McCaffery ...


Anne McCaffrey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Shes chiefly known for the " Dragonriders of Pern " series ..

" Life on Pern as presented in the novels resembles a pre-industrial society with lords, holds, harpers (musicians, entertainers, and teachers), and dragons, with the occasional examples of higher technology (like flamethrowers, telegraph, chemical fertilizers, and powerful microscopes and telescopes).

Pernese people are described as belonging to four basic groups: Weyrfolk (including Dragonriders) who live in the Weyrs, the Holders who live in the Holds (cities, towns and farms), the crafters who live in Crafthalls (or are assigned to work their crafts in certain Holds), and the Holdless who have no permanent home (including traders, displaced Holders, and brigands). "


Only nominally science fiction.


You might like Randall Garrett s 'Lord Darcy " series ...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Darcy_(character)

Alas theres only one novel and a few books of short stories together with a couple of pastiches written after the authors death.

Rob Holdstock is pretty good ...


Robert Holdstock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


" Holdstock's breakthrough novel Mythago Wood was published during 1984 with his true name. Mythago Wood is recognized as Holdstock's first major fantasy work and begins the Ryhope wood series.[9] The books in this series started with the Mythago Wood novella published in 1981 and continue to the present day with the sequel to Mythago Wood, Avilion, published in July 2009.

From 2001 to 2007 Holdstock produced a trilogy of fantasy novels, the Merlin Codex, consisting of Celtika, The Iron Grail and The Broken Kings."


Mythago Wood " is a true classic.


How could you have missed Fritz Leiber ..


Fritz Leiber - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Especially the ' Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser ' stories ... my copies were signed by Leiber back in 1979. ...


Fritz Leiber - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


I could go On ....and On and On :devil:


Did I mention Jack Vance ? ....


Jack Vance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

You mustn't miss the 'dying Earth ' series...

Dying Earth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


You could look around for a second hand copy of the " Encyclopedia of Fantasy " and then use Wikipedia for further research ....


Encyclopedia of Fantasy: Amazon.co.uk: John Clute, John Grant: Books



I have on order the latest of Kate Griffins urban magic novels ....


Books by Kate Griffin | Urban Magic


" Enter a London where magicians ride the Last Train, implore favours of The Beggar King and interpret the insane wisdom of The Bag Lady. Enter a London where beings of power soar with the pigeons and scrabble with the rats, and seek insight in the half-whispered madness of the blue electric angels.

Enter the London of Matthew Swift, where rival sorcerers, hidden in plain sight, do battle for the very soul of the city … "


She's also written a very cleverly contrived series for children under the name 'Catherine Webb ' If you like Sir Terence David John Pratchetts books for 'children ' which adults can enjoy then you will like the ' Horatio Lyle ' books ...


Titles by Catherine Webb - Little, Brown Book Group



Arnold.
 
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andyUK101

Member
Arnold

It was a reasonably serious post - my local waterstones is extremely limited and after browsing it for a good 20 min the other week couldn't spot anything that interested me

Hence the post

After reading your list i can say in all honesty i hadnt heard of or read much about many of books you mentioned but now ive got a few more details ill check them out

Ordered the first 3 runelords books from Amazon and dug out my dragonlance books (amongst the first fantasy books i ever read)

Thanks
 

ARNOLD AKIEN

Novice Member
Arnold

It was a reasonably serious post - my local waterstones is extremely limited and after browsing it for a good 20 min the other week couldn't spot anything that interested me

Hence the post

After reading your list i can say in all honesty i hadnt heard of or read much about many of books you mentioned but now ive got a few more details ill check them out

Ordered the first 3 runelords books from Amazon and dug out my dragonlance books (among the first fantasy books i ever read)

Thanks
Amazon is definitely your friend in this quest but I have been known to buy from Waterstones from time to time. Waterstones does tend to lump genre stuff together in strange juxta positions and so its worth looking in supernatural and horror and sometimes even in crime. In my opinion a good deal of stuff that is classified as Science Fiction is in fact Fantasy and so you might have a glance at ...


Jon Courtenay Grimwood - Books - Arabesk


And then look in the Science Fiction section of your branch of The Evil Empire of Waterstones for the omnibus edition of the ' Arabesk ' trilogy. A quick glance through the book will tell you if you are likely to like the authors style... there's supposed to be a second trilogy in the series coming real soon now but its been coming for some time now.


I've been reading and collecting this sort of stuff for over fifty years and so I may be just a bit ahead of you .. and behind in some areas since some of the books that you mention are not to my tastes.

Your mention of " dragonlance " called to my mind the series connection with gaming and that called to my mind the 'science fiction ' novel 'Dreampark ' and its sequels which really are fantasy about fantasy gaming ...

Dream Park - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Dream Park (Orbit Books): Amazon.co.uk: Larry Niven, Steven Barnes, Jerry Pournelle: Books


Available from £0.01 plus £2.75 shipping from the US of Aliens. :devil:


It's actually sometimes a bit difficult to get some of the books that I mentioned since even the best of books do go out of print, and these days publishers are far more interested in finding the next 'Harry Potter' author than they are in re-printing classic fantasy.It doesn't suprise me in the least that you havent come across many of the books that I mentioned on the shelves of high street bookshops.These days you would have trouble finding many of them on the shelves in public libraries. Still, once you start looking you will find that you can get all sorts of things second hand and at moderate prices.


Arnold.
 
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Kwman

Well-known Member
Or at least it feels that way, im a big fan of this genre and over the last few months havent been able to find anything to get stuck into

Ive read

Empire series - Janny Wurts
Mistwraith series - Janny Wurts
All of R E Feists books with the exception of the latest demonwar one (£18 for 350 pages!!! - ill wait for the paperback)
Tales of fire and ice - B Sanderson
Wheel of time - RR Jordan
All the Malazan tales - Esselmont, Erikson
Farseer, Madship and Tawny man series - R Hobb
Mirror series - I Irvine
Everything Pratchett has done
All the major books by D Eddings (admittedly a long time ago)
Druss, Wayfarer etc etc by D Gemell
LOTR, Hobbit etc - Tolkein
T Covenant series - S Donaldson
Most of K Kerrs early work

Im sure there is more but this is all that springs to mind

The only major series i can think of that i havent read is the Shannara series by T Brooks

Im convinced there is more out there that im missing and wondered what people would recommend
You should really get round to reading at least the first 3 books of Shannara.

Recluse series by L E Modesit are very good, except the first book imho because I hate reading books in first person...He also did the spellsong series and the Corean Chronicles (1st 3 books are good haven't read the others)
 

captainarchive

Distinguished Member
I always recommend the Song of Albion and Pendragon cycle series from Stephen Lawhead, especially if you have the slightest interest in Celtic mythology.
I'm going to put them on my list. I'm also interested in Norse mythology and have several books covering their gods, Odin, Thor and the like but are there any good books based on Norse mythology.
 

ARNOLD AKIEN

Novice Member
I'm going to put them on my list. I'm also interested in Norse mythology and have several books covering their gods, Odin, Thor and the like but are there any good books based on Norse mythology.
Based upon Norse mythology as a central theme? The use of Norse gods as characters in fantasy is by no means un-common but I can't immediately call to mind anything totally centered on Norse mythology save, perhaps, Operas by Wagner. :D

On Norse themes in fantasy you could try Harry Harrison's alternative world novels in the " The Hammer and the Cross " trilogy ..


The Hammer and the Cross - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Norse Gods appear in L. Sprangue de Camps " The Incomplete Enchanter "


The Incomplete Enchanter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


"The Harold Shea stories are parallel world tales in which universes where magic works coexist with our own, and in which those based on the mythologies, legends, and literary fantasies of our world and can be reached by aligning one's mind to them by a system of symbolic logic. In the stories collected as The Incomplete Enchanter, the authors' protagonist Harold Shea visits two such worlds, that of Norse mythology .. "

Of course there are Norse Gods in Gaimans " American Gods " ...


American Gods - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Poul Andersons stories often have Nordic themes and characters ...

Poul Anderson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


" .. Anderson set much of his work in the past, often with the addition of magic, or in alternate or future worlds that resemble past eras. A specialty was his ancestral Scandinavia, as in his novel versions of the legends of Hrólf Kraki (Hrolf Kraki's Saga) and Haddingus (The War of the Gods). Frequently he presented such worlds as superior to the dull, over-civilized present. Notable depictions of this superiority are the prehistoric world of The Long Remembering, the quasi-medieval society of No Truce with Kings, and the untamed Jupiter of Call Me Joe and Three Worlds to Conquer. He handled the lure and power of atavism satirically in Pact, critically in The Queen of Air and Darkness and The Night Face, and tragically in Goat Song. "

Note that the story mentioned, above, 'Call Me Joe ' is the basis for " Atavar" and that it's a pity that they didn't stick to the original story rather than producing a variation on " Dances With Wolves "


See here for a typical rant on the suject ...

http://screenrant.com/avatar-plot-james-cameron-plagiarized-poul-anderson-call-me-joe-ross-32369/


If Andersons story wasn't acknowledged and his estate paid hefty fees then in my opinion this is fairly blatant plagiarism.

Oh ! Back to Gaiman .. Theres his " Odd and the Frost Giants " ...


Odd and the Frost Giants: Amazon.co.uk: Neil Gaiman, Brett Helquist: Books


" As you may have guessed from the title, the novelette deals with characters from Norse myth, a subject Gaiman became entranced with at a very young age. It tells the story of the crippled Viking boy Odd, who, running away from home, is befriended by a group of forest animals--a fox, a bear, and an eagle--who are far more than they seem. In truth, they are the Norse gods Loki, Thor, and Odin, respectively. Hoodwinked by a crafty and vengeful Frost Giant, they have been transformed into animals and exiled from Asgard. Odd offers his help, and travels with the gods from Midgard to their homeland of Asgard, where the plucky lad plans to bargain with the Frost Giant in attempt to save the day. "

It's a novela really ..less than 15000 words .. which may be why it slipped my mind.

And then theres er, umm .. the marvel comics had Thor as a character didn't they and so maybe there are graphic novels that explore Norse gods as themes.

I'm struggling here so I'd better give up for a while.


You need someone from the Viking Re-enactment society ..


The Vikings!


" From The Fury Of The Northmen Oh Lord Deliver Us "

Happy Hunting from,


Arnold .... which is a Germanic/ Norse sort of Heroic Name you know. :devil:
 
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captainarchive

Distinguished Member
Thanks Arnold all of those look interesting, The Hammer and the Cross Looks like the sort of thing I was talking about and what could come more with the highest pedigree than a book by Neil Gaiman.
 

Smurfin

Distinguished Member
Alot of the titles mentioned fall into the "classic fantasy" fiction mould, and particularly some of the older stuff I'd avoid like the plague. I loved Terry Brooks Shannara trilogy when I was a teenager, but they are awful now :( Someone mentioned Terry Goodkind too, but I couldn't get past the first 20 pages, simply due to the amateurish, cliche ridden writing.

Some which spring to mind which are worth checking out are:

Joe Abercrombie (First Law Trilogy, and Best Served Cold - the latter is his weakest but the First Law is stunning)
Scott Lynch (The Gentlemen Bastard Sequence) - the first two books are out, fantastic writing :)
Patrick Rothfuss - The Name of The Wind (very highly regarded)

Oh and GRR Martin's epic....stunning :thumbsup:
 

andyUK101

Member
Alot of the titles mentioned fall into the "classic fantasy" fiction mould, and particularly some of the older stuff I'd avoid like the plague. I loved Terry Brooks Shannara trilogy when I was a teenager, but they are awful now :( Someone mentioned Terry Goodkind too, but I couldn't get past the first 20 pages, simply due to the amateurish, cliche ridden writing.

Some which spring to mind which are worth checking out are:

Joe Abercrombie (First Law Trilogy, and Best Served Cold - the latter is his weakest but the First Law is stunning)
Scott Lynch (The Gentlemen Bastard Sequence) - the first two books are out, fantastic writing :)
Patrick Rothfuss - The Name of The Wind (very highly regarded)

Oh and GRR Martin's epic....stunning :thumbsup:
I love GRR Martins Fire and Ice series - what i hate is the 5 year wait between books. Im in the same situation with Janny Wurts and the mistwraith series, Esselmont and the Malazan series and Sanderson and the wheel of time series

I want to start a series of books that have an actual ending

Joe Abercrombie has cropped up a few times now, had a quick google and looks interesting, ill probably order these once ive finished Theydons recommended Runelords series
 

rickinyorkshire

Distinguished Member
I have read the Dark Tower series. Really enjoyed them. Stephen King tells excellent characters, really draws you into the story in my opinion. :smashin:
Another vote for the DT series. Bloomin brill is my review of them :D
 

fizl

Well-known Member
Cavern of black ice and fortress of grey ice were good books (can't remember who wrote them though).

I'm surprised you don't have the conan books on your list

Also - the Drizzt Do'urden forgotten realms novels

Shaz
 

chrissybhoy

Novice Member
You said you read most of Katherine Kerr's early work. I presume you mean the Deverry series. You have to read on after them. I think I'm just going onto the 15th book in 'the spirit stone'

Also try The chronocles of Blood and Stone by Robert Newcomb
 

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