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HP proliant microserver Vs NAS - fight!

richard plumb

Distinguished Member
So the HP proliant with cashback is a bit of a hit on here, but I'd like to understand some of the key pros and cons vs a standalone 4-bay NAS. Eg something like a QNAP-TS410 or a Synology DS411j. Personally I need a file server with the capability to run sabnzbd and stream without hiccups (eg while its still unraring/par-ing)

Do they all use software RAID, or do any of them have hardware controllers? How do the CPUs compare (HP has a dual core 1.3GHz N36L, whatever that means). The QNAP

sizewise the NASes seem a clear winner. QNAP is 180x180x140mm roughly, the HP is 260x260x210mm, a bit larger.

power consumption - don't know but I'd guess the NASes have less current draw.

Software. Well the HP you can choose which is good, but both NASes seem to run a version of linux and both seem to let you install a decent set of services like sab/torrent client/itunes server etc.


What are the main reasons for choosing a HP if you mainly just need a server? (i.e not for HTPC double duty)? Is the CPU significantly more powerful to run extra apps? Is it quieter? Just the personal choice of OS you can make? price?
 
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kingofpies

Active Member
I'm presuming you got those sizes from Crescent? If so, I think they are wrong. I think they are 26.7cm x 24.5cm x 21.0cm. Still bigger than the NAS dimensions, but much closer :)
 

mrspin

Banned
someone recently summed this up I think on the microserver thread. If you want to play, get involved and a little dirty with the operating systems, maybe run some virtual systems etc then the HP is your man. If you want an out of the box preconfigured nas, stick the disks in and go solution then the qnap/readynas etc are for you.
 

theronkinator

Active Member
A lot cheaper, a lot more flexible and more powerful (in most cases).
Not even a competition in my opinion. I run WHS 2011 on my Proliant and it is set up, configured and running within an hour and a half from first boot up to OS installed and all set up. Hardly any effor at all.
 

djcla

Distinguished Member
A lot cheaper, a lot more flexible and more powerful (in most cases).
Not even a competition in my opinion. I run WHS 2011 on my Proliant and it is set up, configured and running within an hour and a half from first boot up to OS installed and all set up. Hardly any effor at all.

Agree no competition imo
 

nunovi

Active Member
Some scenarios you can do with the HP / Home Server that you can't do with a NAS:

- Automatic ripping of CDs/DVDs/Blu-Ray with full metadata (killer feature in my opinion)
- Transcoding (not with an HP but an AMD E350 Zacate does a fairly good job at that, i3 even better)
- Run iTunes to stream music/movies around the house without have to turn on your pc/laptop (not to confuse with iTunes server on the NAS, which still requires the iTunes program to be running somewhere)
- Home Automation server
- Much more choice for home security.
- Much more flexibility to run other applications to suit your lifestyle - I plugged an iPod dock on it and have it transcoding recorded TV during the night. In the morning, I'd just plug in my iPod Touch and it would sync automatically the TV shows to watch on the tube plus any new music I'd get in the meanwhile. All that while I'm having breakfast.

Nuno
 

Sad099

Well-known Member
Some scenarios you can do with the HP / Home Server that you can't do with a NAS:

- Automatic ripping of CDs/DVDs/Blu-Ray with full metadata (killer feature in my opinion)
- Home Automation server
Nuno

Hi
what software/apps do you use to achieve the above please ?

Thanks
 

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