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Hoya FL-D for Epson TW10

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by robertsage, Jan 6, 2005.

  1. robertsage

    robertsage
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    Guys,
    I've recently installed an Epson TW10 LCD PJ and was wondering if a Hoya FL-D filter was i) available? ii) recommended?

    If anyone has a view or some experience to help me out it'd be appreciated !!

    Ta! :thumbsup:
     
  2. maxiboy

    maxiboy
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    I was wondering the same question, it seems to me that it is really the case that a colour filter (providing that you have the correct equipment/ software to work out which one you need) would do a better job and actually increase contrast.

    Obviously with the budget nature of the projector, any "tweak" would need to be cost effective and I don't fancy my chances of working through a selection of filters to find one that makes a positive difference.......
     
  3. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    Unless you have some form of test gear, that's about the only way to do it properly. :(

    I think it might be possible with the use of some test patterns to determine which colours are in excess, so that a certain filter can be chosen (red, fl-day, amber, yellow etc) to get you in the ball-park so to speak, but you then need to be able to display grey ire ramps so that you can rebalance the RGBs so that grey looks grey from black to white. You'll need Avia or Video Essentials to do that.

    Sometimes just adding a filter will do a reasonable job out of the box, so little or no tweaking is needed, but quite often some colour changes have to be made - it all depends on how picky you are on colour balance.

    As you already said, you can improve contrast with a filter, but this is normaly achieved if the pj is already calibrated to remove any colour imbalance (such as green). By adding the filter the image will take on a pinkish hue, so you then increase the green and blue contrast which gives you a brighter image. The filter has equaly darkened down the image throughout the range, but because you've increased the bright end of the scale, the contrast has improved.

    I don't think you'll see a contrast improvement by adding a filter without any other changes though. If you can find someone who has already done this and you have some settings to try, then you might get some good results that way, but these can vary from pj to pj as well as from DVD player to player.

    Gary.
     
  4. maxiboy

    maxiboy
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    To be honest I always find colour saturation and tint to be the most difficult settings to get right using either DVE or Avia.

    Using both disks I find that the colour looks too artificial when set to "optimum" and I tend to back off a little.

    I think that by adding a filter it could push me over the edge, I could loose track of all sense of colour. It never fails to amaze me when people talk about setting grey level by eye.

    I sometimes wonder whether it is me who needs calibrating?
     
  5. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    I think you need to have a good eye for grey, and should have probably seen a lot of grey to be able to adjust grey scales by eye. The hardest part is setting 100%white - it's often tricky to know if it's got too much green or blue because it's so saturated, and looks white anyway. I think that's why most calibration tales place at 30% (dark grey) and 80% white.

    I can remember being ove rat RTFMs with him and Paul Hayward. They put up a grey scale on one particular projector, and I thought it looked pretty good. They both said it was a bit green, and when Paul used his Colorfatcs to calibrate it, it was indeed a bit on the green side. The difference was noticable when it was properly balanced. I think I'm starting to get more of the hang of it now, so you're not the only one who needs calibrating. :)

    I think the important thing is to get the image to a state that you'r happy with. Having a technically correct picture is one thing, but if you personaly don't like it, what's the point? I think you've got the right idea.

    Gary.
     
  6. maxiboy

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    I do agree with you about having an image that you are happy with, the problem is that in the back of my mind I always think it would be great if a £20 filter could make an improvement to the image.

    To be honest, I am basically happy with the image, all things considered, but who wouldn't want to get something for (almost) nothing.

    As I get older and (slightly) wiser I realise that the grass is not always greener on the other side of the filter. If it was that easy, there would be somebody re-packaging photography filters as "home cinema improvement kits". We all know that the market is there, just look at all of the cables that you can buy!

    By the way I am pleased with my Mark Grant component cable- yes I did feel the need to buy one.
     
  7. robertsage

    robertsage
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    Thanks to everybody for taking the time to reply, your comments have been really useful :lesson: - think I'll leave the filter for a bit!
     

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