How would you describe 3D Blurays?

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
I find it very difficult to describe 3D to people. How do you guys explain it?

I think for me, its like looking at a portal into another dimension rather than a good picture. OLED TVs give some depth to a flat image. 3D images just seem to give a... tangible depth. Its what I think OLED TVs look like in my head until I see one in person then realise its just flat. I talk about infinite contrast ratio giving a three dimensional effect but when I view an OLED TV in person, TBH, its not that. Its just a rich image.

I was watching justice league 3D today and honestly it looked like a portal.. like people fighting in a portal. Then popouts will rarely come in and out..

any thoughts on how you guys describe 3d? I almost feel as if its being given a disservice (and being mis-advertised) as the traditional '3D' we have come to known. Can't help but feel 3D shuld ahev been better advertised and explained when it was popular. I hope with avatar 2 they kind of explain it better.. or maybe ditch the term 3D as its associated with failure and call it something else...

With HDMI 2.1 maybe they will combine 4K and 3D together and call it 4D or 4K3D or 4KD... all i know is they shouldn't hire me as the marketting director as they all sound rubbish lol.
 

Drongo

Distinguished Member
It’s always difficult to describe 3D as, I think, you are trying to describe not an image but an experience. I think the easiest way to do that is simply to say it’s ‘more like real life’ or ‘a greater sense of being there’.

Regarding a change of HDMI version, bringing about a combination of 4K and 3D, I very sadly think that’s incredibly unlikely. Though if I were wrong, I’d be very happy.

There’s little chance of a real 3D revival in the near future. I think the most likely scenario is when 8k television’s are rolled out. 8k is going to be such a modest improvement on 4k it’s going to be a very hard sell. Something other than native resolution is going to be needed. Either a passive 4K 3D image or an active 8k image could just be the thing that drives the sale of 8k sets. Unlikely, but possible. If glasses free 3D is developed that would certainly help, but again, I’m not holding my breath. Which is sad as the thought of passive 4k or active 8k 3D makes me salivate!
 
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kaiserjoe

Active Member
Isn't/wasn't Cameron supposed to be working with Dolby to combine Dolby Vision with 3D somehow without glasses? I think you're right on about needing to ditch the "3D" name if anything were to be relaunched.

Dolby Dimension or something. I'm equally as bad in the marketing department obviously but like Drongo said, 8k on its own isn't really all that sellable. Particularly now people have had time to get used to 4k TVs and, for the most part, decided that really good HDR is probably more of an upgrade than an increase in pixel count. And people have just been upgrading their classics to UHD so can't see 8k remasters being a bit hit.

I wouldn't be surprised to see a rebirth of sorts just because of needing something new to sell to people but maybe more linked to VR but isn't that also a bit of a flop?

You can keep going brighter, sharper, bigger but 3D is just something totally different and they should probably go down the route of playing to that strength rather than just making 3D for everything and everyone.
 

Drongo

Distinguished Member
There is real problem in the consumer electronics industry. When product sales start to plateau, the manufacturers need to innovate something new to drive sales.

Blu-ray was never the great success that manufacturers dreamt it would be. So, Blu-ray 3D was born to drive sales of both Blu-ray as well as televisions and players. In the wake of Avatar, 3D was ripe for home systems.

As is often the case, the launch was botched. The greatest asset of 3D - Avatar - was only available initially to purchasers of Panasonic tv’s.

Implementation of Active 3D was less than perfect and when LG brought out passive sets the manufacturers argued amongst themselves.

The Consumer Electronics industry is not very good at educating people or demonstrating their products. They don’t believe in a slow burn to grow product sales over time. They told us that 3D was the latest and greatest, encouraged us to buy hardware and software. But when sales were not what they expected, they quickly dropped the format, showing no loyalty to the customers who supported them. Of course they had another latest and greatest in mind - 4k.

If they decide that 4K is not worth supporting, they will not hesitate to drop that format and stiff their customers once again.
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
Isn't/wasn't Cameron supposed to be working with Dolby to combine Dolby Vision with 3D somehow without glasses? I think you're right on about needing to ditch the "3D" name if anything were to be relaunched.

Dolby Dimension or something. I'm equally as bad in the marketing department obviously but like Drongo said, 8k on its own isn't really all that sellable. Particularly now people have had time to get used to 4k TVs and, for the most part, decided that really good HDR is probably more of an upgrade than an increase in pixel count. And people have just been upgrading their classics to UHD so can't see 8k remasters being a bit hit.

I wouldn't be surprised to see a rebirth of sorts just because of needing something new to sell to people but maybe more linked to VR but isn't that also a bit of a flop?

You can keep going brighter, sharper, bigger but 3D is just something totally different and they should probably go down the route of playing to that strength rather than just making 3D for everything and everyone.
Dolby Dimension
Dolby Vision

I could role with that. Only issue is DD is quite close and known to Dolby Digital.

I wouldn't bother with VR & 3D. It will always be niche because putting on that big headset just to watch a film is a bit of a bad compromise. Also TV manufacturers won't be very happy lol.

There is real problem in the consumer electronics industry. When product sales start to plateau, the manufacturers need to innovate something new to drive sales.

Blu-ray was never the great success that manufacturers dreamt it would be. So, Blu-ray 3D was born to drive sales of both Blu-ray as well as televisions and players. In the wake of Avatar, 3D was ripe for home systems.

As is often the case, the launch was botched. The greatest asset of 3D - Avatar - was only available initially to purchasers of Panasonic tv’s.

Implementation of Active 3D was less than perfect and when LG brought out passive sets the manufacturers argued amongst themselves.

The Consumer Electronics industry is not very good at educating people or demonstrating their products. They don’t believe in a slow burn to grow product sales over time. They told us that 3D was the latest and greatest, encouraged us to buy hardware and software. But when sales were not what they expected, they quickly dropped the format, showing no loyalty to the customers who supported them. Of course they had another latest and greatest in mind - 4k.

If they decide that 4K is not worth supporting, they will not hesitate to drop that format and stiff their customers once again.

I agree.

3D - draw the curtains, turn off the lights & enjoy. Without doing that, its going to be terrible but I never realised I had to do that for 3D until 2019!
 

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