How to store avi files ?

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Making Forum' started by Merlin, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. Merlin

    Merlin
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    It is better to create an avi file from a project as advised here (thanks MarkE19, Roy Mallard et al)then feed it to an encoder. That way its there to use for further projects. Just how can I stop these avi files mopping up all my HD space. What can I write them to to act just as storage, not viewing.
    I partitioned my second HD into 20Gb for video storage and 51Gb video making but after one project of an hours fotage I can see a need to store the avi I might want again somewhere else other than on the 20Gb, as it wont take many projects to fill a HD.
    Merlin
     
  2. klr10

    klr10
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    If your camera will accept DV-IN, then most people write the finished project back out to a tape.
     
  3. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    Yes, writing back to tape is the only real method of archiving these very large files. If your DV cam does not have DV-in enabled then the only other real option is to get a tape backup drive such as a DLT drive, but these are very expensive and buying another camcorder that does have DV-in will probably be a lot cheaper.

    Mark.
     
  4. Merlin

    Merlin
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    If thats the only affordable option then I guess its do it time. I always try and conserve usage of the camcorder as these things wear out before you know it, especially with the stopping, starting, rewinding etc whilst finding footage. The one I have has full manual overides great for airshow work, pointing to sky and so on but I was lucky to get it as full rrp was £1200 I recall and I had it for £800. I need it to last a long time as I found at the time that mention manual controls and Sony et al see a chance for making ££££ and call it pro camera, often bigger than I want size wise.

    Editing means quadrupling tape across head usage of it.. 1 tape on entire tape to remove gaps that mess up counter for auto capture, then rewind. 2 the actual filming, then rewind, 3 the capture then perhaps rewind..and 4 another tape or scrub existing one and record from HD. Gives me the eeby jeebies thinking about it !

    ...and DVD can only receive MPEG2, not AVI. I have a caddy for removable HD's though on the PC. They now come as 160GB and no doubt larger but just how many hours would that hold I wonder ?
    Merlin
     
  5. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    It's approx 13Gb per hour of AVI footage.
    So 160Gb will hold (takes off shoes and socks to help with the counting :D ) somewhere in the region of 12 hours of AVI footage.

    Mark.
     
  6. klr10

    klr10
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    Your other option would be to buy a dedicated miniDV VCR. They do pop up on ebay every now and then, something like a Sony DHR-1000. I managed to get a couple secondhand for £750 the pair in good nick (they came as a pair as the guy used a mixer not a computer :eek: ) which is even handier so I can copy tapes easily as well. This would enable you to use your camcorder purely for filming. I think JVC make one that has twin decks - miniDV and S-VHS. Cheapest option is to buy a low budget or secondhand miniDV camcorder and use it as a deck, many of the older ones didn't have DV-IN enabled (for tax reasons) but most can be easily enabled using a piece of software on the PC and a cable which connects the printer port to the camcorders LANC connector.... :smashin:
     
  7. klr10

    klr10
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    Incidentally you can store an avi file on a DVD - it wouldn't be playable on a DVD player, but it would be PC readable. I wouldn't recommend relying totally on optical media backup tho' - and in full uncompressed avi glory even a dual layer one would only store 8.5Gb (40minutes ish) ..... :eek:
     
  8. MarkE19

    MarkE19
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    IMO a DV deck is way too expensive for a home editor to seriously consider buying just to use on the few occassions each year that they are editing footage. It is even less worth while when you can get a DV camcorder brand new with DV-in enabled for under £300. This will be good enough as the cheap price is most likely to be down to poor optics etc, but the actual DV transport should be as good as is required.

    Mark.
     
  9. Roy Mallard

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    It seems to me that Merlin might be intending purely to output the edited footage to disc. If this is the case then most DVD authoring packages give you the option wheteher to save your DVD project to a DVD or to the hard drive. 1hr = 4.7GB at 8000kbps, 1h 20m = 4.7gb at 6000kbps.

    As long as you were certain you didn't need to redo any edits, and were only going to put the project onto DVD then this would cut down on your hd usage.

    PS. HArd drives are so cheap these days, theres no excuse for not installing a decent sized HD purely for video, even if you've a laptop you can pick up a 160gb lacie for £100
     
  10. Merlin

    Merlin
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    Thanks for replies so far, just to clarify, I wish to hold onto the rendered avi files as may need to have a better shot at editing them with better titles and other effects in the future, or pull out certain sequences for use in other projects, as such I need to retain the edited avi file. Good to know that dvd can hold avi files if not intending to view from dvd. I had been wondering if as simple file storage avi could go onto dvd, because dvd can be used just for file storage, now I know,...thanks. Pity that DVD dual is 8GB else DVD could be the cheapest way of saving these files, for short clips though thats worth knowing.
    Perhaps then a large HD or two.....or get a poor optics cheapo miniDV camcorder with dv in and buy more tapes, being digital its either recorded or it isn't, no chance of grey areas unlike analogue oxide fallout, is this so ?
    Am I risking losing footage through tape degradation or poor recording heads ?
    Merlin
     

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