How to secure heavy TV on the wall - previous one fell down

Newbieabi

Novice Member
Hello All

I had my previous TV (52 inch - 25 KGs) mounted on a brick wall above the fireplace which has been plastered over. However, unfortunately a couple of days back the TV fell and broke. It was 11 years so some consolation but was still a very good TV !! Some of the reasons I think it fell were:

a). Mount was good quality but had extendible arms and my son was freely turning and tilting the TV which was putting a lot of pressure
b). Used only 4 screws - 50mm that came with the mount. I think 20m was just on plaster and onle 30mm went in bricks
c). Some screws went into the gaps between the bricks

I have got the wall repaired but want to ensure that the new TV will not fall (77 inch - around 40kgs). I do not mind spending on good quality mount and fittings and will get a professional installer but want to make sure that I get it right.

So want to check if there are any suggestions I should keep in mind? I have attached some pictures of the damaged wall and the repair (it has subesequently been skimmed and painted). Other information that may be relevant:

a) above a fireplace as and as you can see in the picture there is a small gap / cavity in the wall where the flute will be there (may not be using right term)
b). fireplace not in use
c). it may be difficult to estimate where the bricks are i.e. how can we tell that screw is not going between bricks

Someone suggested using epoxy resin and M8 studs
 

Attachments

  • IMG_7972-COLLAGE.jpg
    IMG_7972-COLLAGE.jpg
    352.3 KB · Views: 145

Ged

Active Member
I’ve used something similar to what TruroSpurs suggests for a bathroom cabinet and previously rigifix M6 anchor bolts for a Vogel’s TV bracket which has two arms and is used in a corner location. It’s only got three bolts supporting a 40 inch TV which is rarely moved but (so far) isn’t showing signs of movement. I’m not sure of drill bit size but think it could be 12mm.
My wall is plasterboard dab/dob on breeze block.
 

John7

Well-known Member
The OP's wall is not dot and dab plasterboard. It is a plaster skim over a brick wall.

OP - it looks like the failure was caused by using insufficient length screws and one of the high load bearing ones (top left) failed because it went into loose brick or gap in the brickwork.

In order to be secure, you will should put in more than 4 x fixings, spreading the load over a bigger area. I would suggest a minimum of 6 x fixings or even 8. Use proper load bearing expansion fixings, like this...

.

You can tell when these are correctly fixed because the bolt will tighten up properly into the brick. If the bolt cannot be tightened and the fitting keeps spinning in the hole, you have hit a hollow in the wall and you should drill into another area of the wall until you find solid brick.

Because wall brackets have a series of pre-drilled holes, it can sometimes be difficult to locate a secure spot without having to drill new holes in the metal bracket. When I am faced with suspect wall, I would fix a 12mm or 18mm thick plywood panel to the wall using conventional screws/plugs (of sufficient length to take account of the thickness of the ply, plaster and brick. You can then use as many fixings in the ply as necessary to ensure a secure fix. Then install the bracket onto the plywood using decent screws.
 

sraper

Active Member
In order to be secure, you will should put in more than 4 x fixings, spreading the load over a bigger area. I would suggest a minimum of 6 x fixings or even 8. Use proper load bearing expansion fixings, like this...

.
This is what I always use and at least 6. Never had a problem even with a heavy 50" plasma and 79" tv.
 

Newbieabi

Novice Member
The OP's wall is not dot and dab plasterboard. It is a plaster skim over a brick wall.

OP - it looks like the failure was caused by using insufficient length screws and one of the high load bearing ones (top left) failed because it went into loose brick or gap in the brickwork.

In order to be secure, you will should put in more than 4 x fixings, spreading the load over a bigger area. I would suggest a minimum of 6 x fixings or even 8. Use proper load bearing expansion fixings, like this...

.

You can tell when these are correctly fixed because the bolt will tighten up properly into the brick. If the bolt cannot be tightened and the fitting keeps spinning in the hole, you have hit a hollow in the wall and you should drill into another area of the wall until you find solid brick.

Because wall brackets have a series of pre-drilled holes, it can sometimes be difficult to locate a secure spot without having to drill new holes in the metal bracket. When I am faced with suspect wall, I would fix a 12mm or 18mm thick plywood panel to the wall using conventional screws/plugs (of sufficient length to take account of the thickness of the ply, plaster and brick. You can then use as many fixings in the ply as necessary to ensure a secure fix. Then install the bracket onto the plywood using decent screws.


Thank you - As the wall has already been plastered so putting the plywood panel is no longer an option unfortunately :-(

But will use longer fixings and probably 8 fixings.
 

John7

Well-known Member
You misunderstand - fix the ply to the wall on top of the plaster. It will be hidden by the tv and can be painted if you wish. It will give a much more reliable fixing for the tv.
 

Newbieabi

Novice Member
You misunderstand - fix the ply to the wall on top of the plaster. It will be hidden by the tv and can be painted if you wish. It will give a much more reliable fixing for the tv.

Ah ok - thank you.

a). So first I secure the ply on the wall with very long fixings
b). Then secure the TV bracket on the ply?

When we fix the TV Bracket on the ply how long / deep the fixings should be i.e. I am assuming that the fixings will go in the brick wall through the ply to ensure that TV bracket is firmly secured and has no chance of falling down?

Do you have pictures or examples that you could share.
 

mikej

Well-known Member
Those huge holes in the brickwork really shouldn't be there - it looks like you've either got a brick or two missing, or the heat from the chimney over time has caused them to crack or crumble. Were the holes properly filled in before it was plastered over ?

Personally, I would be looking into an alternative location for the TV based on this incident and the general appearance of that brickwork but, if this is your only option, then at least have a serious think about whether you really need a cantilever bracket. The new TV is bigger and a lot heavier than the old one and a fixed or tilting bracket will put a lot less strain on the wall fixings and be much less of a risk.

I use Rawlbolt anchors (as mentioned above) for this kind of job, A standard house brick is around 10cm thick (plus another 1-2cm for the plaster and the thickness of the bracket) and I'd be aiming to go around 3/4 of the way through the brick. If going for the plywood option, you would want to use plenty of screws to fix the bracket to the board.

TBH - if you're talking about paying an installer to do this, then these are all decisions that they should be making. Just don't use the same person as last time !
 

The latest video from AVForums

LG G1 OLED Evo TV and SVS SB-1000 Pro subwoofer reviews, Samsung OLED rumours and more...
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom