How to get the best speeds with BT

notroubleclubber

Active Member
Today i go live with my new 900mbps service from BT. Guaranteed 700mbps and upload speed guaranteed of 110mbps.
Up to today i have been using the 300mbps service from BT which i had no problem with so i thought i would pay the extra £3 a month and for the 900mbps.

Checked the wifi on my iphone 12 pro this morning and it showed about 350-400mbps download and 110mbps upload. I thought it may take a little while to max out so left it until i have returned home where to my dismay its hovering around the 300-350mbps mark (all tested using speedtest okla).

OK, i thought it maybe the limit of the wifi on my phone so i googled and apparently it should handle approx 800mbps?

So i thought i would try the macbook air i have and that was same result. Exactly the same - 350mbps download and 110mbps upload.
I restarted the hub and done a speed test with BT and this checks from the exchange to my house --- and its coming back 980mbps and 110mbps upload.

I thought i should then try some hard wired devices so tried my shield pro that is ethernet connected and that is showing a respectable 900mbps and 110mbps upload using the android speedtest app from okla.

I have come upstairs to my gaming pc. It is connected via ethernet to a complete BT wifi disc which is "wifi'd/paired" to the main router/hub. Same test comes back with same upload speed (110) and download speed is 550mbps. I always seemed to max out my 300mb connection with my gaming pc and all wifi connected gadgets before.

Have i upgraded and my equipment cant cope with it? I am happy to run an ethernet wired system around the house in the new year if it means every room can have max download speeds or is there another way i can get the max amount of dl speeds instead of cabling everywhere?
If i need to cable ethernet then i would run one ethernet cable from the router (which is in the cupboard downstairs) to the loft and then put a switch in the loft where i can then run separate ethernet to each room (maybe 2 per room?). I would make sure the switch is a gigabit one.

Any other ideas?
 

psychopomp1

Member
You really need to use a wifi 6 router and/or wifi 6 mesh system (along with wifi 6 clients of course) in order to get wireless speeds close to 1 Gigabit as wifi 5 (which is what BT's kit and discs are) will only give you max 500-600 Mbps, unless using a wifi 5 4x4 router paired with a 4x4 wifi 5 client.

I also have a BT FTTP Line 900 (albeit its BT Business) and these are the sort of wireless speeds I'm getting. My router is a Netgear RAX200 and it blows BT's router away for wifi speeds and range.

iPhone 12 Pro:

speedtest-mobile.jpg


Desktop PC with an Intel AX200 wifi 6 PCI card:

speedtest.jpg
 

notroubleclubber

Active Member
so looks like if i even go for the best wifi i still not going to max out my 900mbps? In which case, looks like i should be cabling ethernet around the house then? I already have ethernet in the main lounge for the tv/xbox/shield pro etc (i used the cabling to phone sockets and converted these to an ethernet socket and put a gigabit switcher at the tv) and the shield can see 900mbps so i am happy there.
As i have firesticks in the bedrooms then i cant run ethernet to these anyway , though im not really bothered about that - just need max download speed at my gaming pc so looks like i am running a cable either staright to my gaming pc (spare rm upstairs) or running a cable to a gigabit switcher in the loft where i can then feed multiple points upstairs (including my gaming room)

Thanks for your help - it has helped me decided what i am to do
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Have i upgraded and my equipment cant cope with it? I am happy to run an ethernet wired system around the house in the new year if it means every room can have max download speeds or is there another way i can get the max amount of dl speeds instead of cabling everywhere?

Yes basically you have moved the bottleneck to the speed of your Wi-Fi. As @psychopomp1 states you need to upgrade your Wi-Fi to get faster speeds but that only real works with devices that actually support it.

Most devices will be happy if you can supply 50-100Mbps to them so before you go spending your money on newer router or access points think do you really need them?

By all means upgrade with cabling for those devices that need it as that will “guarantee” the speed to those and take them off Wi-Fi
 

notroubleclubber

Active Member
Yes basically you have moved the bottleneck to the speed of your Wi-Fi. As @psychopomp1 states you need to upgrade your Wi-Fi to get faster speeds but that only real works with devices that actually support it.

Most devices will be happy if you can supply 50-100Mbps to them so before you go spending your money on newer router or access points think do you really need them?

By all means upgrade with cabling for those devices that need it as that will “guarantee” the speed to those and take them off Wi-Fi
yes, i think you have answered my question. Just run ethernet around the house will be cheaper and would also give the max download speed as possible and wifi the rest of the "non essential" devices.

Many thanks to all
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
Most devices will be happy if you can supply 50-100Mbps to them so before you go spending your money on newer router or access points think do you really need them?

I'd echo this from CM: Perhaps be a bit "zen" about it and ask yourself whether any of the applications you are running on your Wi-Fi devices actually need a super fast connection to the Internet before you spend a load of money on new Wi-Fi kit. If the apps I use are all working fine, I just don't worry that my 72mbps laptop NIC can't go anywhere near as fast as my 300mbps Internet service: It rarely is it a "problem." Maybe twice a year I'm downloading something "big" and I temporarily hook up an an ethernet cable to my lappy. Most of the time, I can't be bothered and just put up with it taking a few minutes longer than it could.

As others have said, and I concur with them, a better investment of time and money might be to install "proper" cabled ethernet links and run everything that can, particularly stuff that doesn't physically "move," on wires thereby leaving more "air time" available for the remaining Wi-Fi devices.

Even for your wired devices, I'll bet not many of them, not very often, actually utilise the capacity you have acquired. This also speaks to a subtlety of the data networking "numbers game" - high speed links are really about more "capacity," (called bandwidth in the jargon,) not more "speed" per se. Having a "fat" pipe to the Internet might not be a huge advantage to any particular workstation/app. But it accommodates more of them running concurrently without competing with each other for the available capacity. (Same for any other link in the infrastructure.) It is a bit like roads - compare a single track road and a motorway. The motorway is (really) about moving larger numbers of vehicles per unit of time, not really about getting any particular vehicle there quicker, though it may achieve this by reducing likelyhood of congestion (M25 excluded of course.)
 

examiga1990

Active Member
As i have firesticks in the bedrooms then i cant run ethernet to these anyway , though im not really bothered about that - just need max download speed at my gaming pc so looks like i am running a cable either staright to my gaming pc (spare rm upstairs) or running a cable to a gigabit switcher in the loft where i can then feed multiple points upstairs (including my gaming room)

snip
You can get an add-on to convert your Firestick to take ethernet cable as I use one. Not to sure if any good with the speeds your after though but cannot see why not??
 

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