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How to erase A DV tape???

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by lauteng, Aug 11, 2002.

  1. lauteng

    lauteng
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    Hi there. Can anyone tell me how to erase (or format) a DV tape on my PC120? Thanks.
     
  2. drewboy

    drewboy
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    Hi,

    i presume the simplest method is to rewind the tape to the beginning and record with the lens cap on for the entire lenth of the tape.

    Regards,
    Drew.
     
  3. lauteng

    lauteng
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    Thanks. I know of that method. But that will record the sound as well. I wish to know the method to erase everything to make the tape looks like new again. Anymore ideas??
     
  4. alan8477

    alan8477
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    I posted a similar thread to this some time ago. My problem was that I wanted to record correct time code (not having been aware of the importance on my early cassettes). No response unfortunately.
     
  5. graham.myers

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    I think recording 'nowt' is the only way to lay down the time code.

    thats how I've done mine.
     
  6. Drafter

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    If you have a MIC input on your camcorder put a dummy plug ( I use an adpter from sterio mini plug to 2 RCA's with nothing connected to the RCA's) the idea is to use the built in mic disconnect function. Now you can lay down a clean time coded track. This is better than new, unrecorded tape and is recommended before using any tape.
    Drafter
     
  7. alan8477

    alan8477
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    That is my normal way of doing things now, but I do have 2 or 3 early tapes with non consecutive time codes. Cant see any way of re-setting this. Simply recording from beginning to end does not affect the timecode.
     
  8. AAA

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    I also have ten or more tapes without setting the code...

    Never had any problems.

    Can somebody explain if it is important and why it is so important to set the code?...

    And why then the miniDV tape manifacturers Do Not tell you anything about that?

    Thanks,
     
  9. graham.myers

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    You dont NEED to set up the timecode. It just make it easier for offline editors to find thier posiiton on your tape.

    When you load into an offline editor you build a batch play list which is a list of all the in and out points to grab from tape.

    If you had a single end to end time sequence on the tape then the OLE can find all the bits and load them unattended. If you didn't do this each segment *may* have its own time code starting from 00:00:00.0 maybe because there was a gap from the end of the last segment so it didn't know about it. In this scenario you will have to manually FF and RW the tape to each in point.
     
  10. Drafter

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    The reason to pre-record the time code is simple. If you always record from the beginning to end of a tape you probably wouldn’t have problems. If you review a tape or take it out and put it back in the camcorder you may have a blank spot. The time code starts over at 0:00:00 after the blank spot. If you then try to edit the editing program can’t find one of the sections.
    Drafter
     
  11. Arthur.S

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    The BIG drawback to this method is headwear. The poor old cam is getting twice the amount of work to do. personally, I find it a whole lot easier to just make sure there are no gaps on the tape. If I can, I keep the tape in the cam until I'm finished with it & ready for editing. I'd rather waste a few minutes of tape than decrease the life of the cam.
     
  12. alan8477

    alan8477
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    Hmmm, wouldn't have thought headware was in any way significant. Perhaps others use their camcorder much more than I do. Compared to my household VCR, I would estimate my useage of the camcorder to be 1/50th of the home VCR. I would expect that I will wear out before the record head of my camcorder.
     
  13. Arthur.S

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  14. alan8477

    alan8477
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    Thanks for that Arthur. I don't dispute that doing what I suggest introduces additional headwear, it's whether that wear is of any significance.

    On reading your thread, it would seem the key issue is whether or not you record in sequence. Your thread seems to suggest that a tape that has been recorded out of sequence, and therefore has many zero starts, can be corrected by rerecording. I have to admit that I did not think this was possible, though it has been so long since I have not 'blacked' a tape that things may have changed.

    In the end it would seem that if you don't do computer editing it does not matter. If you are able to record in sequence (without gaps) it does not matter. I'm afraid the reason use computer editing is because my 'live shooting' is crap. I could never be so disciplined as to record without gaps.

    I think my final thought on this is that technology facilities are there to be used. Why buy a Ferrari if you are worried about the cylinder wear over 50mph? 'Blacking' tapes makes life easier, Adobe Premiere recommend it.

    Of course all of this might be a load of rubbish!
     
  15. Arthur.S

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    It's a personal choice, absolutely. I also use my PC to take out all those 'feet' shots. :D It doesn't really need much in the way of discipline to shoot a few secs longer than you need. (with the cap on if you like). What always worries me about blacking, & recording back to the cam in general, is that camcorder heads just aren't made as robust as a common 'ol VCR. VCRs' are built for regular use, timeshifting & such. The manufactures know that a domestic camcorder won't be used for anything like as much. Early digital camcorders especially had a very short head life. It was a major issue at the time. Things are obviously much better now, but (being a natural sceptic:rolleyes: ) I still try to keep recording to the cam down to a minimum.

    Cheers,

    Arthur.
     

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