How to connect Toshiba Fire TV audio via HDMI to old Samsung HW-C500 receiver?

JSho

Novice Member
I got an older Samsung HW-C500 from my parents a few years ago, but this is my first time setting it up. I mainly wanted to use it for my turntable (done and it sounds good) and I though, why not hook it up to my tv too for better sound? In my mind this should be easy, both have multiple HDMI ports so it should work, right? Shouldn't this be the easiest part? The answer is no.

So I got a digital optical cable and it works fine, but it's really driving me nuts that I cannot seem to get the receiver to play the tv sound through the HDMI connection. I have followed the tv instructions for hooking it up to an external receiver using the HDMI 1/arc connection, specified the HDMI option for the TV input on the receiver and....nothing. Maybe the receiver is just too old at this point (the tv is about 2 years old, and the receiver is about 11 years old at this point). I can use the digital optical output, but my understanding is that HDMI is really the best, especially for surround, and I'd prefer not to have more cables than necessary.

The TV is a 32" Toshiba Fire TV 32LF221C19
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
TVs don't include HDMI outputs so you'd not be able to ordinarilly convey audio from a TV via HDMI unless both it and the AV receuver are ARC enabled. ARC (Audio Return Channel) is a means by which the HDMI cable from an AV receiver's ARC enabled output to a TV's ARC enabled input is repurposed and used to convey just audio from the TV to the AV receiver. Both the TV and the AV receiver would need to be ARC enabled to use this feature.

I'm under the impression that your AV receiver isn't ARC enabled so you'd not be able to use ARC to convey audio from your TV to the AV receiver.

If not ARC enabled then you'd not be able to use ARC and you'll have to continue to use the optical connection you are already using. You are not losing anything and ARC would be limited to the standard definition 5.1 lossy formats you can currently access via S/PDIF optical. Streaming services and TV broadcasters don't use HD formats anyway.
 
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D

Deleted member 39241

Guest
I found a photo of the back of your AVR online, and there is no mention of ARC on the HDMI output. Usually the port would be labelled ARC if it supported it.

Does it specify in the AVR manual that the HDMI output is ARC enabled?
 

JSho

Novice Member
No mention of ARC enabled HDMI jacks in the receiver manual so I guess the HDMI "feature" of this receiver is basically useless. Isn't the entire point of HDMI is that it can transmit both audio and video? While the manual of the receiver doesn't, as you both guessed, mention ARC enabled ports, it does state: "By connecting through the HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) interface, you can play back digital video and audio." Why would you even bother putting HDMI ports into the receiver if they kind of do, well, nothing? There are 4 HDMI inputs, and one specifically labeled as an HDMI "Output" on the back of the receiver that is supposed to run to the tv. I don't understand why you would go through the trouble of hooking up all your peripherals to the HDMI ports in the receiver) if they don't even transmit the sound, which seems like the point of a receiver to me.

Anyway, optical does work, so that's fine. Glad to know the issue is this ancient (tech-wise) digital receiver with its oddly useless HDMI ports. Thanks for your replies.
 

JSho

Novice Member
Good to know the optical cable is an ok option sound-wise. I mean, the bar is pretty low here, moving from computer speakers to a digital receiver. But what's the point of all those HDMI ports in the receiver?
 
D

Deleted member 39241

Guest
The HDMI inputs on the AVR take video and audio from the source device that is connected to them, (eg Blu Ray player),processes the audio and sends it to the speakers, and passes the video out to the TV via the HDMI output.

If that HDMI output is ARC enabled (Audio Return Channel) it can also work as an input to feed audio from the TV back into the AVR.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Unlike SCART hdmi cables carry audio and video from source to either an av amp or tv. With the the av amp the output goes to the tv, otherwise you wouldn’t get a picture. Some people have more sources than the 3-4 inputs of the tv.

Later amps and TVs have arc to allow one hdmi cables between tv and amp to carry the sound in the opposite direction to normal, as @Rambles states.

There is nothing odd about your hdmi connectors...
 

JSho

Novice Member
Unlike SCART hdmi cables carry audio and video from source to either an av amp or tv. With the the av amp the output goes to the tv, otherwise you wouldn’t get a picture. Some people have more sources than the 3-4 inputs of the tv.

Later amps and TVs have arc to allow one hdmi cables between tv and amp to carry the sound in the opposite direction to normal, as @Rambles states.

There is nothing odd about your hdmi connectors...
Coming from the generation that mostly streams tv on a laptop, I have limited experience with AV receivers. I guess it makes sense if you have many different peripherals, which I don't, but good to know the options if I get more. Like I said before, it still sounds better than my tv or laptop speakers by leaps and bounds.
 

JSho

Novice Member
The HDMI inputs on the AVR take video and audio from the source device that is connected to them, (eg Blu Ray player),processes the audio and sends it to the speakers, and passes the video out to the TV via the HDMI output.

If that HDMI output is ARC enabled (Audio Return Channel) it can also work as an input to feed audio from the TV back into the AVR.
Yeah, no ARC from the receiver. But the optical connection sounds fine. Thanks for clarifying.
 

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