How to connect COAX to RCA coaxial jack?

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by JimBissett, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. JimBissett

    JimBissett
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    Hi Guys. I've tried searching for an answer but can't see it, so if it's already there on another thread then my apologies. I have a Proline DVD 1040 player and the player only has the following connections:

    Video - RCA jack
    S-Video
    Audio R & L - RCA jacks
    Coaxial - RCA jack
    AV - Scart

    I want to connect to my TVs through an existing coax network in the house (one per room) into each TV's aerial/antenna connection. I've tried splicing an RCA jack onto the coax and plugging into the Coaxial RCA connection on the player, but nada. Now I'm stuck. Help please? :rolleyes:

    Jim
     
  2. StevieDvd

    StevieDvd
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    If I understand correctly you are trying to use the video out of your dvd to send via tv coax cable plugged into a tv aerial socket!

    The dvd has an rca composite output (video,left & right audio) these connect into the same sockets on a tv. Much like a playstation.

    TV aerials are not composite but RF (an analog signal containing video & sound).

    You can get a converter but would feed the 3 rca jacks in one side and get a tv rf out the other.

    Hope I've understtod the question and have answered it for you.

    Steve
     
  3. ZippyCat

    ZippyCat
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    What you are attempting to do will not work as the connections you have listed do not output an RF signal. To achieve the desired results you will require an RF modulator to convert composite + L&R audio signals (the most common type) to an RF signal for distribution.
     
  4. JimBissett

    JimBissett
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    Thanks guys, you both got what I'm trying to do. FYI I'm Brit Army based in Brunei, and the house they moved me into has a coax cable networked into each room. I was trying to set up the DVD player in one room & watch it in any room, I already have the local sat system rigged up this way with a remote control receiver that passes a signal down the coax so I can change channel on the sat. I don't want to install more wiring 'cos it's not my house & I'll be moving on in 18 months.

    My next question is, assuming I can get an "RF modulator" here, it should be easy to connect it to the same coax & then I can have the DVD player in one room, then while one TV can be watching that another TV can be watching the sat channel, connected to the same coax? Quality isn't really an issue for the TV's in the other rooms and the set in the main room is connected through scart.

    Thanks for the info.:)
     
  5. ZippyCat

    ZippyCat
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    Yep, you’ve got it right. You should be able to purchase a cheapish modulator for about £30, but make sure it has audio inputs as not all modulators include these.
     
  6. StevieDvd

    StevieDvd
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    A modulator will do the video/audio signal to tv signal buyt if you want to send several signals from DVD & SAT etc down the same cable I believe that involves something called a mulitplex which can seperate the signals - it's getting beyond anything I've done.

    Have you considered the wireless gizmos that can send signals to other rooms, they are usually composite (i.e the video, left & right audio).

    Steve
     
  7. ZippyCat

    ZippyCat
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    There is no problem with the modulator route, and no multiplexing is required. As I understand it JimBissett’s is currently distributing standard RF signals from a satellite STB to multiple televisions via a standard aerial distribution network. The only coordination required with the modulator is to ensure that the output frequency does not clash with any terrestrial channel or the frequency used by the STB, in effect he is only adding a further channel for each television to tune in. Multiplexing would only come into play when trying to send composite signals and above down a single cable.:)
     
  8. JimBissett

    JimBissett
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    Thanks for your time guys. You got it dead-on zippycat, but you put it better than I could! :) I'm curious though, why is one connection on the DVD player marked COAXIAL? If I'm reading you guys right, I would connect the video and audio L&R RCA jacks to the modulator, what's the RCA COAXIAL connection for? (As you may have guessed, I'm a novice here). It's not that important since I'll do as you all suggest, but I am curious.
     
  9. ZippyCat

    ZippyCat
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    The RCA COAXIAL is used to connect the DVD player to a surround sound amplifier, it carries a digital audio stream for an amplifier to decode and convert into surround sound (it is the electrical version of the Toshlink type optical connection).
     

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