How QD-OLED is different from WRGB OLED. What's better? What's worse? How did it end up like THAT?!

Michael7877

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How QD-OLED is different from WRGB OLED?

What's better? What's worse?

This is some of my experience after one day of casually using my new TV, Samsung S95B, as a monitor, before installing it!
:

My A8G and S95B both have modes where no dimming will occur, no matter what you put up on screen (in SDR). With the Sony, it's Custom picture mode, "Off" and "Low" settings for OLED peak brightness. With Samsung it's just when OLED light is "Off". The S95B's "Off" is one of 3 options, and is brighter than A8G's "Low" (two of 4).

I think the A8G (compared to the S95B) works better as a monitor in its higher brightness modes - even though its full screen white is 50-60 nits lower. The reason: no matter the brightness of the S95B's screen with High/Medium OLED light settings, a full screen white is much dimmer than half screen white. That's right, with OLED light set to "High" and "brightness" down at 5/50, (MUCH dimmer than even 20 out of 50/"Off", the brightness of white depends on how much of it is on the screen... It isn't right. Literally dynamic dimming when the thing is pulling 63 watts from the wall! White should be what you set it to until the maximum allowable power limit is reached. Past that point, it is expected and reasonable that white's brightness will fade as its size grows. Choosing to dynamically adjust brightness arbitrarily (disregarding the screen's actual brightness and going by the state of the "OLED light" setting which itself is meaningless beyond defining the possibility of an unknown is just plain dumb). The firmware authors should get on fixing things right away. I haven't tested video yet, but after seeing what a dim white screen does, presentation can't be flawless lol.

My A8G (and everyone's WRGB OLED except LG's G series, maybe..) was not a good choice for a computer monitor. Why not? It's not because of burn in. It's because, when the box at the back gets hot from pumping out 230 watts for 10 minutes, the part of the panel covered by it gets raised in temperature by 10-12 degrees C. The effect this has on the picture? Not a small one. The hotter part gets very much brighter, and colour temperature changes. Cooler, much cooler. Almost the amount you'd see from switching from neutral to cool. If you're a WRGB OLED owner and you don't believe me, all you have to do to see this yourself, plain as day, iss open to mostly white web pages side by side, and let them sit there for 3-5 minutes. Make sure there's enough movement that auto dimming doesn't begin. The brightness difference is probably 25 nits (dimmer around the outside where the box doesn't cover), full field going from ~135 at the top edges, to 160 in the covered area. I've had the thought many times that it's amazing most people are even able to calibrate their TVs with the colours where they are on the panel (part or all of the area is usually covered by the box at the back). What should have been done: Put the 5 or 10% window for calibration at the top, where the electronics box isn't adding heat and holding in panel heat. Watching a movie at the correct brightness takes an average of just 90 watts on a 65 inch TV. The back barely gets warm. The top of the panel would have been a much better reference. It's too late now lol. Probably for you and definitely for me because I have a new TV now. Everyone will know for next time where the colours go.
The entire S95B display is uniform brightness, side to side. I've had it on for hours now, full white at probably 200 nits (pulling 270 watts). Even though it has a much hotter "hot spot" in its trunk of junk, there's no evidence of it at the front, visibly. No brightness variation, and no colour temperature variation. Now, the prudent thing to do (knowing what I do about heat and what it does to electronics), I'm going to create an active cooling solution. It'll be easy - pump some air through the right side of the rear box, cover the top vents, and leave the left side open so all the parts can be cooled well. I was going to do the same thing to my A8G, but before I knew it 6000 hours had passed and I hadn't started so I never did. Good news is though, the increased operating temperature of the panel (area heat contained by rear hdmi box) didn't seem to increase the speed of OLED degradation noticeably. 16,000 hours and the panel is still completely uniform. Except when I try to use it to browse websites or read documents anywhere but in the middle 2/3 & bottom 2/3 lmao.


Oh, can't forget my last point until tomorrow: text is much better on the QD-OLED than WRGB OLED. I know people say that the pixel arrangement isn't conducive to optimal text rendering, but it's also not conducive to blurry text rendering either. Windows 10 has to be above 175% scaling for me before text in file folders/the desktop/start menu become indistinguishable from perfect for me when using my A8G. 200% and I don't see problems unless I'm looking for them). S95B is a different story. With scaling at 100%, fonts don't look bad, every letter is legible. To describe... You know how when you're trying to set up cleartype on your laptop and it's saying "choose the best one" and you have to choose between two that look pretty much the same? I think the difference between best and second best clear-type examples is easily twice as big as the difference between perfect 100% text and S95B's rendering of 100% text. Is the display perfect? No! I have seen an artifact caused to a line by the subpixel layout. It was like 10 inches long, too. And I'm sure there will be many more similar lines in the future. When I saw it I got to thinking "where have I seen this before...?" Oh yeah! On my WRGB OLED... especially vertically. And displaying stuff rendered at 1080p but sent at 4K... The issues weren't much of a bother there, and I don't think they will be here. Text is much better, I'd say fully healed. The other problems are present and can't be fixed and aren't any worse than WRGB OLED, so aren't reasons to avoid. It's very possible pink text on a green background doesn't render well, but since that's 0.0000001% of all text everywhere, who cares?


OK, so. I have the A8G for another 2 weeks or so. I want to evaluate both, every way I can. And document it and put things in this thread.
What should I do?
If you had both, tell me: What would you do?
 
For a computer monitor, forget QD-OLED. The bright white you get will cause burn in because of the lack of a white subpixel.
 
I assume you're quoting from the rtings tests? Hardly a real life scenario and they've already been discredited for their flawed review of the new S95C.

Thousands of QD-OLED's monitors and televisions have been sold and with just a handful of those experiencing any screen burn being down to inappropriate settings or use. Just like any other OLED panel. Sony A8H, A80K, A80J, A90J, and A90K OLED's actually are worse according to rtings if you aren't taking any precautions.

The tests only allowed compensation cycles to run on two manufacture's models which, in real life isn't correct, as certainly the Samsung QD-OLED's run them automatically under standby conditions.

So basically it is like running your car engine flat out for days on end without any cyclical maintenance.
 
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There is a greater chance of burn in with QD-OLED. That's a fact. Also, white is not as accurate.
 
It's a fact that QD-OLED's are not alone and, from many owners I've read about in the past year, once the same precautions are taken the risk is as minimal like any other OLED has been.
Don't know why you've introduced white into this debate.

But unfortunately anything in life will have a risk if abused and driven beyond what it should be. The tests, as rtings state, are not normal and they are definitely skewed in favour of LG's because they are permitted to run compensation cycles, whereas the Samsung isn't. But it's funny how people are obsessed with any apparent issue with QD-OLED's yet LG woled's have some of the worst kind of panel lottery ever compared to QD-OLED. Plus the pink tinge as well...
 
It's a fact that QD-OLED's are not alone and, from many owners I've read about in the past year, once the same precautions are taken the risk is as minimal like any other OLED has been.
Don't know why you've introduced white into this debate.

But unfortunately anything in life will have a risk if abused and driven beyond what it should be. The tests, as rtings state, are not normal and they are definitely skewed in favour of LG's because they are permitted to run compensation cycles, whereas the Samsung isn't. But it's funny how people are obsessed with any apparent issue with QD-OLED's yet LG woled's have some of the worst kind of panel lottery ever compared to QD-OLED. Plus the pink tinge as well...
My LG C1 has no pink tine or uniformity issues. Also, my LG C1 did not come bent like a lot of Samsung S95b.
 
My LG C1 has no pink tine or uniformity issues. Also, my LG C1 did not come bent like a lot of Samsung S95b.
What is the size of your C1?

Just under a year ago, I opted for the 55" C1 rather than the 65" because of reports on the latter of problems with pink tints, and uniformity issues.

My TV has been problem free.
 
My LG C1 has no pink tine or uniformity issues. Also, my LG C1 did not come bent like a lot of Samsung S95b.
And my QD-OLED hasn't any issues, but it is meaningless to say 'mine doesn't' as an example as we all can state this as a subjective example.
I also stated it is a lottery, you've got a good one so that's great.
lg woled panel uniformity - Google Search

Another take on the rtings screen burn review OLED and QD-OLED Image Retention and Burn-in Longevity Testing at Rtings.com – Our Thoughts and Analysis - TFTCentral

LG's with bent screens lg tv screen is bent - Google Search
 
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What is the size of your C1?

Just under a year ago, I opted for the 55" C1 rather than the 65" because of reports on the latter of problems with pink tints, and uniformity issues.

My TV has been problem free.
I have a 65" C1. Works very well.
 
I don’t think I’ve seen any 65” C1/G1 without pink tint. You got lucky.
 
There was recently a major shootout with the Sony A95L, LG G3, and Samsung S95C. The order of ranking is
  1. A95L
  2. G3
  3. S95C
Things have moved on since the OP started this thread. OLED in general has gotten better with LG's MLA and Samsung's QD-OLED Gen. 2 Things are going to get even more interesting when the new blue pholed comes to TV. It's said that may not be until 2025.

Without the new blue pholed, Samsung could make the most changes. They could add in Dolby Vision, drop the One Connect, fix HLG, improve upscalling, and stop diddling the colors to make them seem better then they are.
 
QD-OLED had better marketing for a while 😜
In all seriousness the difference is that the oled doesn’t lose light by having to pass through a colour filter, in fact it gains light by making a quantum dot phosphoresce.
Or something.
 
I don’t think I’ve seen any 65” C1/G1 without pink tint. You got lucky.
Panel uniformity is still an issue with LG's as well, so you also need to be lucky with this.
As for the shootout, 2023 Value Electronics TV Shootout Results
For what it is worth the G3 beat the S95C by less than a decimal point. Hardly worthy of any bragging rights. The shootout team considered it to be a tie.
 
Panel uniformity is still an issue with LG's as well, so you also need to be lucky with this.
As for the shootout, 2023 Value Electronics TV Shootout Results
For what it is worth the G3 beat the S95C by less than a decimal point. Hardly worthy of any bragging rights. The shootout team considered it to be a tie.
Reviewers such as Stop the Fomo and Phil Hinton have said that the G3 is better then then S95C. I don't conciser it a tie. I consider it a win for the G3. I don't know of any top reviewer that has said the S95C is better then the G3. The G3 just has much more going for it.
 
QD-OLED had better marketing for a while 😜
In all seriousness the difference is that the oled doesn’t lose light by having to pass through a colour filter, in fact it gains light by making a quantum dot phosphoresce.
Or something.
There is now have MLA that lets the light out. QD-OLED is not brighter. It's fairly similar with one doing some things brighter then the other.
 

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