Question How much do I need to spend on soundproofing?

sea surfer

Distinguished Member
I'm look for some advice on soundproofing costs, I have just started work on my home cinema room, my detached building is 30 feet away from my home, and roughly 50 feet + away from my nearest neighbours, there is a large open space all around the building. The building is built with a single breeze block construction, there is no insulation as of yet on wall or in ceiling, it's is just single plasterboard on wall that has been dot and dabbed on. The floor has kingspan underneath with concrete on top then tiles on top layer, I have two double glazed windows and a PVC door, Ideally I would like to black out the 2 windows permanently and somehow fix another solid door porch.

My room dimensions are 23 foot long by 12 foot wide.

I have already picked my carpet and underlay, to probably sit on top of a floating floor.

My normal listen levels are around -12 / 10db. with movies going off no later than than 9 pm.

Advice appreciated.

Mark.
 

adam-burnley

Distinguished Member
Before you spend anything, have you tested sound leakage?

You will benefit from adding insulation for thermal purposes, so might as well incorporate soundproofing as well. But whether you need to go the whole hog and build a room within a room is another matter. Before I started on my room I tested whether I could hear anything outside, and from about 15 feet away I couldn't hear anything.

You also need to decide what your acceptable finished dimensions are. You can lose quite a bit by building the walls out, although you do have a enviable starting size.

A good place to estimate material costs is www.soundstop.co.uk They have sections for walls, floors and ceiling, with different methods and a simple calculator that will work out the required materials and costs based on the dimensions entered.
 

sea surfer

Distinguished Member
A good place to estimate material costs is www.soundstop.co.uk They have sections for walls, floors and ceiling, with different methods and a simple calculator that will work out the required materials and costs based on the dimensions entered.


Thank you for a link to the site, its exactly what I was looking for and very easy to calculate:thumbsup:


I will get some testing done this week for sound leakage and take it from there.


Cheers

Mark
 

The Dreamer

Distinguished Member
Thank you for a link to the site, its exactly what I was looking for and very easy to calculate:thumbsup:


I will get some testing done this week for sound leakage and take it from there.


Cheers

Mark

Just to add to the good advice from @adam-burnley , make sure you test with 'bass heavy' material, as it is generally easy to stop higher frequencies, whereas the lower frequencies take a lot more stopping. But with the space you have around your room, bringing leakage down to an acceptable level should be relatively easy.

The other thing to checkout, is how much sound comes into the room. Having a low 'noise floor', i.e. a pretty silent place to watch movies, allows you to maintain a constant volume setting throughout a film - if you can hear someone mowing their lawn while you're trying to watch, it'll a. bring you out of the movie, and b. may mean you turning up the volume in the quiet stretches to cover it (then having to turn the volume down again at the explosions, as it's now too loud)!

So soundproofing needs to work both ways.:smashin:

HTH
 

sea surfer

Distinguished Member
Just to add to the good advice from @adam-burnley , make sure you test with 'bass heavy' material, as it is generally easy to stop higher frequencies, whereas the lower frequencies take a lot more stopping. But with the space you have around your room, bringing leakage down to an acceptable level should be relatively easy.

The other thing to checkout, is how much sound comes into the room. Having a low 'noise floor', i.e. a pretty silent place to watch movies, allows you to maintain a constant volume setting throughout a film - if you can hear someone mowing their lawn while you're trying to watch, it'll a. bring you out of the movie, and b. may mean you turning up the volume in the quiet stretches to cover it (then having to turn the volume down again at the explosions, as it's now too loud)!

So soundproofing needs to work both ways.:smashin:

HTH


Many thanks for the advice it's taken on board :thumbsup:
 

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