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How Much Better ?

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by gtfc, Jun 20, 2002.

  1. gtfc

    gtfc
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    I have an eight year old 21" Panasonic (4:3) playing various DVDs into RGB enabled Scart I think I get a very good picture apart from on some of the darker scenes where everything just seems to go black and I lose a lot of the image. Things like Shrek seem good.

    Is it time to replace the TV and how big an improvement will I see from a current 50hz or 100hz 28" widescreen of good quality.

    Is 100hz something to pay for or is it irrelevant on a 28" set.

    Hope some of you have some views.

    Many Thanks

    John
     
  2. Squirrel God

    Squirrel God
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    Certainly, a good quality new TV and/or a good quality DVD will not result in dark images going all black! You do not say what make and model your DVD player is, so be aware that this can be the source of problems too (e.g. JVC DVD players have a habit of not doing too well on dark images - their TVs also seem to struggle somewhat with dark images as well).

    CRTs do have a limited life span but obviously it all comes down to what you are happy with. I would go into a store and have a look at some TVs and see if the image seems much better to you (from RGB input off a DVD). Only then can you really decide.

    I presume your Panasonic is a Nicam set? You don't say whether you have a separate amp/speakers or not. But if you did not want to go down this route, a lot of TVs now output quite good sound (Virtual Dolby, BBE, etc) and fairly decent RMS wattage which would certainly add more presence to your movies than the weak (RMS) stereo output that you got with a lot of older (4:3) TVs. My TV's built in sound is certainly enough to keep me happy.

    I have a 100Hz widescreen set and personally I couldn't go back to 50Hz now. The clarity and stability are heaven!
     
  3. Zacabeb

    Zacabeb
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    New TV's are so-so.

    A new set will probably not have the age flaws of your old set, but it will have flaws. Some that are intentional and some that are caused by cost cutting. Whether you find it better or not depends on what you thought of your old set. If you liked your old set, as I liked mine, you may not find it easy to live with a new TV.

    Three things to notice in newer TV's:
    • SVM or Scan Velocity Modulation
      This 'feature' detects vertical edges in the picture and offsets the electron beam during the scan. The result is that the electron beam speeds up and slows down around object edges, and the picture information is moved out of place.

      Originally, SVM was meant to compensate for beam blow-up that occurs at extremely high contrast levels. It no longer is used that way, but as a general 'sharpening' feature - and the result is that edges around objects get bevels. In this process, you actually lose detail sharpness.

      A feature that often comes along with SVM in expensive sets is LTP. This shrinks the edges of objects so to sharpen them. This doesn't cause the same beveling as SVM, but adds sharp edges where there should be no sharp edges, such as in out-of-focus scenes. With SVM added on top, it doesn't look right but very artificial.
    • Digital processing resolution
      In 100Hz sets, the picture must be digitized and stored in a memory. This is usually done using cheap technology with significant quality tradeoffs.

      For instance, in the vast majority of 100Hz sets, the color resolution is reduced to a quarter before storage (4:1:1 chroma subsampling). Depending on the sampling frequency used, the color resolution may drop below half of what DVD can deliver via RGB, and below a 5th of what video games can. When it comes to RGB, 100Hz sets don't compete in definition with analog 50Hz sets.
    • Hidden features
      Aside from the horrors the manufacturers openly advertise, there are many not-so-advertised features.

      These include strange interference problems, humming noises, unreasonable geometry distortion, clicks and pops, whining capacitors, and inexplicable limitations of operability.

    If you wish to go with a 100Hz set, you definitely must do some heavy research before you decide what to get. Most of those sets are... rubbish.
     
  4. gtfc

    gtfc
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    Hi,

    It's Nicam but I use a sony NS300 DVD with a Kenwood KRF9050D for sound through a motley collection of hifi and AV speakers, I guess I'm trying to justify the new TV before a dedicated matched speaker set.

    Regards

    John
     

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