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Question How long would you expect a Dell Inspiron 15R SE to last ?

MLR

Well-known Member
As title really. How long would you reasonably expect a good spec branded laptop to last ?

Not used everyday, maybe a few hours a month
 

Kei86

Well-known Member
I've have both a toshiba satellite pro P100 and an HP compaq nc6400 that were both used regularly through university and in work that were bought in 2006 that are both still running fine today. (The toshiba's battery is knackered but the HP is still pretty good) Treat it with care, like keeping it away from the dreaded fluff and give the fan/vents a hoover out every few months and it should last well.

The toshiba doesn't see much use now as I replaced it with a Dell XPS 15 last spring but the HP is still frequently used as a linux machine.
 

MLR

Well-known Member
Yes I also have an old HP NC6400 that works great, and a Compaq CQ62 (I think) that works fine and even some old piece of crap Acer that just about manages windows xp if you have a week to wait for it to load.

Yet the most expensive and the only new laptop i've ever bought, has failed after "almost" 3 years.

It's not as if it's had alot of use, as I tend to only use it a couple of times a month for an hour or 2 at most, yet the motherboard has failed (which seems to be a common problem on the Inspiron range), and Dell don't want to know.

There answer is that the warranty has expired, so if I want it to work again, then it will cost £354 for an engineer to come and replace the motherboard with a refurbished board and for that I will get 90 days warranty on the motherboard, or £270 exchange.

Now I understand that the warranty has expired, but as this seems to be a common issue with Dell Inspiron's (looking around on google), Dell seem to be well aware of the problem as people reporting the same issue as myself on there own support forum (laptop won't turn on, status light on psu turns off when you connect to the laptop), the first reply from the Dell reps on there is that the motherboard needs replacing.

Yet Dell says the warranty has expired, so pay up or go away.

Surely this should be covered by Sale of Goods Act 1979 ? there is a clear fault on a part that does not suffer from wear and tear and surely a product of this spec, price range and "quality" should be reasonably expected to last longer than "almost" 3 years of occasional use ?
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Surely this should be covered by Sale of Goods Act 1979 ? there is a clear fault on a part that does not suffer from wear and tear and surely a product of this spec, price range and "quality" should be reasonably expected to last longer than "almost" 3 years of occasional use ?

Did you buy it from Dell?

The Sale of Goods Act only applies to the retailer. The manufacturer's only responsibilities are to do what they said they would do - i.e. honour their warranty terms.

If you did buy from dell then make sure you've told the person you're talking to that fact. Offering to provide proof or purchase may help.

Inspiron is Dell's entry level line but the 15R SE appears to have been the top model of that line so I would expect it to last longer than three years.
 

MLR

Well-known Member
According to the customer service rep that emailed me today.

Dell is "only liable to replace parts or systems free of cost only if it is proven legally that there is an inherent fault on the given machine".

Not quite sure that is true, the sale of goods act 1979 doesn't read that way to me anyway.
 

Miss Mandy

Moderator
That's taking it at its loosest terms, but essentially right. The onus is on the consumer to prove that the faults were there from the start or are down to a design fault. This means you need to get independent reports done to back up your case.
 

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