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How long does it take to install a Barco CRT?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Godfather, May 17, 2004.

  1. Godfather

    Godfather
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    How much time does it take (for a professional) to install and calibrate a Barco Cine 7 onto an 8' ceiling? Hopefully I'll be going this route soon so I'll need to take a day or two off work. I already have an electric screen so it's just the pj that needs to go up.
     
  2. Jeff

    Jeff
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    It takes about day for the first install, then a few hours a couple of weeks later to finish off.
     
  3. Roland @ B4

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    It usually takes a day, I've done hundreds (litrally). Most go really smothly but there is always the occasional gremlin.
    The reason for tweaking the machine a week or so later is that they are essentailly controlled and adjusted by moving or chaning the magnetic fileds around the tubes them selves. Installing a projector into a new magnetic field will sometimes require a few tweaks later.
    It also gives the customer a chance to use the projector for a bit and spot any issues.
     
  4. Godfather

    Godfather
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    Thanks for the replies. That's very helpful.
     
  5. gary makinson

    gary makinson
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    Hi Roland do you know off any one who can help with the fix and install off a cine 7 in the Lancashire area
    Thanks
    Gary
     
  6. Tight Git

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    Given the age of the above thread, plus the fact that Roland hasn't been heard from since early last year... :)
     
  7. decypher

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    YES I DO know someone who covers most areas in UK.
     
  8. decypher

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    Roland has completely disappeared , and the other person that I know used to do setups no longer post on the forums so Im guessing he is not bothering any longer.......... I do know he charged £ 700 for a full installation and that he was based in the southeast , cant remember his name but he used to list CRTs on ' famous auction site ' until about 3-4 years ago and then stopped
     
  9. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    My word this is an old thread....I haven't heard from Roland in a long time. I hope he and his family are ok. The only person i know who is left working on CRT's (all my clients except one has moved to fixed pixel devices...but strangely i was working on his 9" sony two days ago) is Chris Frost. You should do a search on here for Chris. He has lots of experience with CRT and with Roland out the loop Chris is, without doubt, the last man standing!
     
  10. Paul D

    Paul D
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    Roland has been working for Veritek Global since 2011...
     
  11. Dreamer

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    I would like to add my recommendation for Chris Frost. He set-up my Barco 1209s about 18 months ago and he done an excellent job. 100% dedicated to getting it right and he is very friendly and helpful. The cost was very fair also. Although i bought an Epson tw6000 last year for 3D i still use the Barco as well. It has a great 2D picture with 3D depth and i'm still amazed by it. When it came to it i just couldn't part with it!
     
  12. mooro1973

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    Mine took for ever to install back in the day. And I never stopped tweaking. My 800 graphics was at least half as big as my hospital digs. Happy days.
     
  13. decypher

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    indeed - earlier and/or smaller models had ES focus, ( such as 800 / 801 series ) and this was prone to drifting , where as later 8 / 9 series all had EM focus and were/are rock solid in comparison

    on my setups I converge / calibrate them in at around the hour mark, which represents half a typical movie, so its the perfect compromise for those that DONT want to run warm up cycle, which is an unnecessary consumption of tube + strain on HT circuits

    on a well behaved machine, a full setup can take as little as 3 hours, ( excluding physical mounting etc )

    these CRTs might be so called ' old tech ' but image wise far superior to anything you can buy

    check out Odeon HD8000 projectors, 3 chip DLP , NEC made, £ 100k each, no true blacks, grid structure still there, and occasional motion blur too, and on some of the screens u can see fixed pattern wear from the actual DLPs themselves......................£ 100,000 or £ 600 for a decent used CRT ?

    too many people have ' moved on ' to bulb machines simply because of the smaller size + skill needed to setup / safety issues upon setting up etc , OR simply they tried to set them up themselves and ended up with a mediocre image - - nothing to do with image quality

    there are no bulb PJs as good as a high end CRT PJ , :eek: ( if there were Id have one right now - smaller size etc ) who knows when that day will come, :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2012
  14. decypher

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    absolutely.

    your Epson 3d is good for future visits to opticians etc :suicide: where as Barco offers stunning image quality with 3D depth ,

    so called 3d is really just a gimmick, known as ' stereo 3D ' within the industry, on Tron Legacy they avoided such stereo-3d and tried to generate as much depth as possible, all other 3d films were junk by comparison ( avatar aside )

    when u watch a 2d image, your brain generates depth to the image, the better the image, the more lifelike it looks, the more depth you get

    hence why quality CRTs still produce the best film images

    when you watch a bulb PJ or a junk LCD / PLasma flat screen ( theyre all junk btw ) your brain is no where close to being fooled that the image is lifelike - personally I still use a 28 sony Wega for SD / daily viewing , Ive seen and had larger flat tvs and all complete junk IMO ......defo a case of quality v qty

    on a CRT PJ you get both automatically.............
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2012
  15. mooro1973

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    Stop it. You'll be tempting me back on the saddle.
     
  16. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    Plus of course some (like Godfathers) had contrast modulation circuits so you could get something close to a uniform white across the screen rather than an obvious green to blue to red colour change as each colour gun dominated. It was quite a stark change in colour as the circuit was turned off and on again. Calibration to D65 would be impossible except in one small spot.

    And of course you did get a brightness drop off at the edges of around 45 to 50% when measured compared to the centre.

    They certainly could produce some good images, but then, so can fixed pixel displays. For some years now, other than absolute black level, they could easily compete or surpass even the best CRTs. One owner for example, uses his G90 for everything other than 1080 material because his JVC produces a better image at that res.

    Don't forget that CRTs had poor ANSI contrast and unless you had an LC model, you'd get haloes around brighter objects and the black levels would change brightnes and colour as the white content and colour changed within a scene. That can happen even in the best 9" LC models like the Marquee 9500 ultra for example. CRTs can't do bright white and black at the same time very well.

    lol, ok, but try using the CRT to fill a 60 foot wide screen and it will fail miserably. Plus today they use higher res models and screendoor isn't an issue. Not exactly a direct or fair comparison but if you're clutching at straws trying to convert those who don't know, then it's a nice try.

    To get the best out of a digital requires set up too, especially with respect to image brightness on smaller screens. Many people moved to digital because after doing comparisons, found the digitals to produce a better overall image. Pros and cons. Black levels could be better with CRTs, but quite often would compromise shadow detail due to black crush because they can't come out of black fast enough to illuminate the next IRE level (from D16 to D17 for example). If you wanted full shadow detail you wouldn't get full fade to black - unless you had a custom gamma circuit or external processor.

    It seems to me you're living in the past with little or no experience of a properly set up digital pj, so I'll be predatory on your ignorance - I've still got two CRTs (no digital at the moment). If you think my CRTs are that good, how much are they worth to you? One is a Seleco 310 and I can't quite remember the Sony, but you can have them both for a steal at £1000 :)

    Gary
     
  17. decypher

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    ahem, cough, splutter...............

    actually Ive seen plenty of well setup fixed panel PJs, and all they are all inferior to a good CRT , at least for domestic home cinema

    you say that ' apart from the black levels ' , well its the lack of black level that ruins the bulb PJs image quality

    if u take any photo graph and lighten its black levels, you get a washed out image thats vastly inferior,

    also we need to consider the response rate of CRT is + 1 Billion times faster than a LCD panel, and 1 Million times faster than a Plasma panel

    so really, anyone wanting motion blur images with the best black levels and the most film like quality, CRT is still the no 1 choice

    I completely disagree that any bulb PJ is as good, I have worked on setups with customers who have had high 3 chip DLP PJs, sold them, and bought a 8 or 9" CRT , there is no way people would entertain any of this if the bulb projectors were even 75% as good

    it really depends on how sensitive one is to poor image quality, most people cant tell the difference between a LCD TV and a CRT TV, yet put the side by side and the LCD image quality is laughable at best

    its easy to forget just how good some ' old tech ' can be, when people move onto the lastest tech

    take a good old fashioned Tube Amp, may measure horribly, but then listed to it next to a £ 5,000 class A-B amp and hear the difference :suicide:

    old is not always inferior, especially with regards to AV

    all the best
     
  18. decypher

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    ???? is this a joke ? comparing a 7" ES basic CRT PJ to 8 / 9" EM machines ?

    if it is a joke, then err, hmmm

    if it isnt, then it explains all your comments about bulb PJs being a good.........

    from what Ive seen to date, nothing comes even close to a good CRT ,
     
  19. noiseboy72

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    I agree! CRT is excellent with smaller screens and high levels of black out. It is only really the lack of brightness that lets them down.

    I used to work on a daily basis with the old Sony 1272 / 1292 CRTs. The lack of resolution or to be more specific, sharpness was the main issue with these machines. The lenses introduced a fair degree of image distortion that then had to be corrected out on the convergence grid.

    Have a look at some of the new 4LCD projectors. These give much better colour gamut and contrast. These are still not as nice on the eye as a well set up CRT, but they do get closer.

    For me, I could not live with the limited brightness, but I quite understand why some still hanker after the technology.
     
  20. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    That I find hard to believe. I've seen G90s and 9500 Ultras, both good and bad, and yes they do produce fantastic images, but as mentioned in my earlier post, they are far from perfect.

    That shows a complete inability to calibrate a display and you're basing image quality on the one thing that CRTs can do well - but to a point. Black levels or the lack of them do cause colour desaturation at near black, but that's it if properly set up (CRTs are no different). If you just raise the brightness control and do nothing else then of course the results will be less than stellar. To get good shadow detail from any CRT you need a raised black floor anyway (see my earlier post).

    I think you've just made that up. CRT phosphor does have a decay time and relies on our persistence of vision for the scanning to fool us into thinking we're seeing a complete image. And I don't think 50hz or even higher refresh rates such as 120hz can be classes as billions or millions of times faster. What's the fastest refresh of your CRT?

    Not for many people, and unfortunately it can't do some things like 2.35 setups without losing res. Blending can work but isn't always successful.

    As I mentioned before, even a JVC is considered better than the likes of a G90 when trying to project 1080 material and that's from the owner who has both.

    And I know people who have gone the other way, so that proves nothing.

    If it was a 3 chip DLP on a screen that was later replaced with a CRT then the screen was too small and the reflectance levels too high to give a good image - a basic and fundemental error with a digital display. Were you responsible for that set up? Whoever did it clearly didn't know how to set up a pj for correct reflectance levels.

    You seem to judge image quality on black levels alone, without consideration for colour gamut, greyscale (D65), or even white and brightness uniformity (of which you seem unaware). ANSI contrast means nothing to you. A CRT, if it were bright enough, would not even pass a quality test to be considered good enough for the minimum standards (SMPTE, THX) for a commercial theatre.

    Sometimes people remain stuck in the past and wear rose tinted glasses. :)

    There are no real standards for audio like there are for video, and subjective testing of equipment is just that, and people can hear what they want to hear (this cable is better than that cable for example). Video has standards and can be measured. Of course people still can and do have personal preferences and don't want an accurate display calibrated to the standards.

    Well, while that's true, it's not always true. :)

    Gary
     
  21. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    No, I was comparing them to digitals because you're suggesting that all CRTs are better than all digitals, so I wanted to see if you'd put your money where your mouth was. :)

    It seems now you're saying that only the high end machines are better than digitals.

    Make me an offer.;)

    So far I've not seen a single comment from you to prove the opposite apart from some misinformation and "CRTs are better than digitals because they can do better blacks". Without custom gamma even that is debatable unless you want crushed black level detail.

    Sounds like you haven't seen much or are unaware of certain things like those I've mentioned above.

    Gary
     
  22. Godfather

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    Wow, has it really been 8 years since I started this thread? I was a big CRT fan for a few years but things have moved on and so have I. Gary, I'm still waiting for you to pay a visit. :)
     
  23. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    Hey Henry! :)

    How's things? Still up in Scotland and enjoying the work?

    I'm still busy here and haven't yet started on the new cinema room. I can't believe it's been over 5 years. We really do need to catch up. :)

    I think we need to take this to PM...

    Gary
     
  24. decypher

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    :rolleyes:well according to Gary bulb PJs have the same black levels as CRT, same colour fidelity, same pixel response, and same gridless film like image quality....

    well Ive clearly not see the PJs Gary is using, but Ive seen a £30,000 Sim2 3 chip dlp that looked very poor compared to a 8" CRT

    maybe it wasnt setup properly :suicide: Im guessing all the LCD and PLASMA Tvs will also look as good a high end CRT TV also, once you set them up properly :suicide:

    lets be honest, all digial display tech is a big step forward in image quality,

    heres a test, try to calibrate a PC LCD monitor and see if you can , Ive never seen one that can , they all lack the black level to calibrate

    as for pixel reponse , no i didnt make the info up, u can look it up online

    and whilst it doesnt mean u need 1 billion FPS for smooth video, it does explain why even a £ 100k Odeon PJ has motion blur , if that has it I cant see many consumers not

    each to their own I guess, but the question does remain, why would I or anyone want a 70kg , 4 foot long beast of a PJ , when a small portable unit would do just as well ?

    anyway, dont mind a bit of banter, and always good to hear others POVs
     
  25. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    Do you know what the on/off CR for a CRT is (lets say a G90) when set up for good shadow detail without using gamma mods? Unless you use gamma mods your CRT will not do fade to black and good shadow detail and a JVC can match it. Digitals with less CR can match it with the use of ND filters but at the expense of the white level. Can a CRT fill a big screen like some digitals to the same reflectance level? No, and you can't add a filter to increase it's lumen output.

    Have you heard of REC709 and D65 and use them when calibrating? Most digital pjs can be calibrated to the standards and many have ISF modes just for that purpose.

    Motion can be an issue with some displays I agree, but the point is that all projection technologies have their pros and cons, but you don't seem to want to admit that.

    CRTs aren't filmlike - only film is film like and to be honest it's had it's day as a medium for presentation. I don't watched scratched dirty prints with reduced res jittering on my screen any more.

    As for colour fidelity, some CRTs need c-elements to colour correct the lenses or they can't be accurate. Some aren't correctable in the same way as some digitals have over saturated gamuts that can't be corrected unless it has an external cms.

    I own two CRTs and nothing else right now.

    Probably not, but they're a very revealing display and will show up deficiencies in source material. CRTs are very good at hiding that which could also be a bad thing if you don't want to hide detail. I've seen a G90 that was poorly converged and not at it's best (they cost £28,000 when new btw) but I don't go using that example at every opportunity because it's a bad example. I've also seen the same G90 having just been calibrated by James and it was producing one of the best images you can get, but the owner uses a JVC for 1080 because it produces a better image.

    I'm not saying that at all. I'm saying that a digital display can look a lot better if set up correctly than if it's just used out of the box. The same can be said for CRT except they'd be completely unwatchable until calibrated - convergence alone would do that.

    This is the projector forum so why are you now mentioning direct view displays?

    You seem to be ignoring examples of the G90 owner who uses a JVC for 1080 material, and have missed the post by the originator of this thread. He owned a very nice Barco 808 (I've seen it and it produced a very nice image), but as he said, he's moved on and now owns a JVC (check his sig). Those CRT owners don't entirely agree with you.

    Yes, lets.

    Seriously, you're using an LCD edge lit display as an example of a digital pj? Of course you can calibrate a back lit display and it's nothing to do with it's lack of a good black level - you just have to decide which areas you want at D65 if the back light is skewing the results elsewhere on the screen. This brings me back to the CRTs that can't do white - according to you you can't calibrate those either then.

    Are you telling customers you can't calibrate their displays because they have a poor black level? I've never heard any of the forums pro calibrators say that.

    CRTs do have much faster response times and less motion blur than LCD that's for sure (micro seconds compared to milliseconds), but refresh rates are important too, especially if you don't want to see flicker. DLP is of course faster still.

    But why do you still keep harping on about the same old tech 1K Odeon pj rather than what's around right now (2K and 4K)? I'm not saying all CRTs are rubbish because of the ones I seen in my local pubs or one bad example and saying they're all bad. I'm a little more honest than that. Lets use current examples that are available now rather than outdated tech that isn't.

    POVs are one thing, inaccurate or misleading info is something else.

    Gary
     
  26. decypher

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    *** ? :suicide: :rolleyes:

    Well why didnt you say so Gary (!) , so you own 2 CRTs and nothing else,

    but have decided to go guns blazing putting down CRT tech, saying a fixed panel bulb PJ can be better ? :facepalm:

    well its certainly put a smile to my face, your quite right, bulb PJs are 'better' but in the meantime you and I are + many others are sticking to CRT

    what I dont get , is how you can say that the CR and shadow level on a backlit display can be on par with a normally off display like a crt face , the fact that you need to start messing about with ND filters, raising Gamma, experimenting with different gain screens etc , just tells me that the iamge quality is inherantly flawed , and thats before we add in motion blur and the native grid panel structure

    CRT isnt perfect, but from a video display technological POV and the results it can produce, I havent seen anything to match it yet

    Sony are currently producing OLED broadcast monitors that can match CRT performance, and they clearly state this, making a big issue of the CRT reference, I dont think they would be striving to create a non backlit OLED display, if current backlit ones were good enough ?

    with regards to the black level of a CRT projected image, it can be made to be a true off state whilst maintaining good shadow detail, at least on a good 8 or 9" tube

    I dont have any problems with a Barco 8 and dont need more than 75% contrast on eco drive to achieve a fine white level, so long as room is fully darkened there is defo no problem with white level, but I guess a lot comes down to the installers eye............

    I guess at the end of the day, CRT v BULB PJs is a lot like Tube Amps v Trans. Amps , as always the trans. will measure better on paper, but the tube sounds better in reality every time where it matters, in the feel and emotive quality of the sound, Im really not into tech that measures amazingly well on paper but fails to deliver the goods --- Ill leave that allure to the mass consumers and their failed awareness.....
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2012
  27. Gary Lightfoot

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    I didn't say that. I said digitals do some things better than CRTs, and CRTs can do some things better than digitals and a properly set up digital does a pretty good job that beats CRTs in some areas (and vice versa of course) - hence the G90 owner who uses a JVC for 1080, or the guy who had two stacked G90s but replaced them with a Sim2 3 chip DLP and anamorphic lens. All properly set up and calibrated of course.

    Overall I prefer digital but I do like the 8" and 9" crt - especially the G90, but they're not perfect, (nothing is) and can't really do what I want. I still have the two CRTs because they are too fuzzy, can't do HD and you can't give them away. Neither are up and running right now and I will be using a digital when I get the room ready.

    A G90 when set for good shadow detail (no gamma mods) was measured at under 10,000:1 on/off CR by a well know G90 calibrator. Any JVC will easily exceed that without any loss of detail (if calibrated). Now, if you lower the G90 brightness control to improve the black level you will lose shadow detail.

    I think you've misunderstood. I'm not comparing backlit direct view to projection. CRTs can't do blackout and good shadow detail without gamma mods. The ones I've seen can't anyway. Henry's Barco had a good black level but the brightness was set too low, and some shadow detail was hidden until he raised the brightness using a test disk to get it accurate. It's a personal choice of course, but for video black there was still a glow on the screen.

    Panel grid as you call it isn't an issue with a 1080 display unless you sit closer than something like 2 to 2.3 x the screen height with DLP, and closer still with DiLA.

    How do you set the brightness control on your CRT? By eye or some other means?

    CRTs are limited on lumen output for full screen field, but can do brighter spots (power supply limitation IIRC). Digitals don't have that problem so if you're using a relatively small screen and you want cinema levels of reflectance (around 9fL to 12fL in real terms) rather than brighter levels (like a plasma), you need to dim the image down (hence the ND filter). It's not a display problem as you suggest, it's a set up issue. I can see that you don't realise that and many don't, but more often than not, that's why digitals can look bad (even when comparing one digital to another). It raises the black level and highlights artefacts. Then CRT owners who are used to a dimmer image and don't know how to set up a digital say how bad the tech is. If you wanted a bigger screen with a CRT but the image was too dim you would use a higher gain screen perhaps wouldn't you? That's a set up issue too, not a tech issue (unless you say a lamp is too bright or a CRT too dim)

    It depends on what you're looking for I guess, but many would disagree. Many CRT owners judge a display purely on black level and ignore everything else, as you seem to be doing with the points I raise.

    See what I mean? Judging something purely on black level. OLED has been around for a while now, it's not new.

    If you use a test disk to show D17 I bet you can't get total blackout when you display D16.

    Henry had around 101 lux in the center of his 7ft wide screen (IIRC) - about 250 lumens, and 45% less at the edges. With a 1.3 gain that was around 12fL IIRC. Perfect. But that was with contrast modulation switched on. Without it the screen was far from white. If you want a bigger screen, then the image becomes dimmer of course. If you increase the contrast you can start to crush bright detail - remind me, which gun has the brightest output? If you ramp up all the guns then one will overpower the others and you will have a colour imbalance. If colour accuracy and image detail is important then you want the correct balance for an accurate greyscale.

    How do you set contrast?

    It's not. What you're describing is personal preference and audio is a perfect example of that - there are no real standards to set audio to unlike video. There are video standards that displays can be calibrated to (REC709, D65 for example), but I don't think you do that when you set them up.

    Don't get me wrong, I do like CRT and I've seen some excellent examples with their own imperfections, but digitals are equally capable but have their own. I can tell that you don't really know how to get the best out of them and you're probably judging them on that rather than what they really can do if set up right.

    Like I said, I don't judge all CRTs by the ones I see in the pub and then say they're all like that.

    Gary
     
  28. Jeff

    Jeff
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    Didn't I already answer this 8 years ago?

    I miss my Barco 1209s, if it wasn't for the bad green tube and blue flicker issue I would have held on to it longer. I did try to get it fixed and spent over a grand doing so but it wasn't to be.

    There is definately a lushness to CRT that digitals don't seem to be able to recreate.
     
  29. Paul D

    Paul D
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    Preference and accuracy are two different things.

    I listen to Talk sport via MW. I have got used to the sound, and the presenters have a certain tone to them. Lately, i have been listening to Talk Sport via DAB and the internet. The sound quality is much better and much clearer. However, i cannot stand it! The presenters now sound squeaky and other sounds are very thin. I have even got used to the MW interference, which my brain seems to filter out.

    Valve amps and CRTs have a certain tone/picture also. Over time you have got used to it. Digitals PJs and modern amps can be way more accurate, but seem wrong to some because it is not what you expect.

    Now i have used DAB and the internet more, i know notice how muffled the sound on MW is, and i also now notice the interference on MW. So i have managed to ruin both ways of listening to radio! :facepalm:

    I started my home cinema adventures with CRT. I spent a lot of time travelling the country to see the very best CRT installs, and attending CRT/Projector meets. Although James (who had Marquees) may disagree, i found the Barco Cine 9 to give the best image possible. I had a low end Barco Data 808s at the time, and was all set to upgrade first to a 1209s, and at some point either a Sony G90 or even a Cine 9.

    Because it was all new to me, i questioned everything!
    These questions started to irk some people on the CRT section, as the established order was CRT ruled and digitals were crap. I have to say, to a certain extent this was perfectly true at the time. With the Davies Cinema 1 DLP being very popular, it didn't do digital projection any favours. Low resolution, poor colour and massive screendoor. Not to mention rainbow flashes just about everywhere. It had black levels that could actually outshine some CRTs white levels!

    Forget CRTs high level of commitment, both with maintenance/installation and size. It was picture flaws that didn't seem to be mentioned here that amazed me the most. I first questioned haloing, and was shot down that this was just part of the technology. Scan lines also never seemed to get mentioned, as did flicker. The fact that as the resolution rose, the softer the picture became. For people who care about recreating and accurate picture just didn't care that a lot of CRTs couldn't even do a proper red (more towards orange).

    Now i admit that i am a black level junkie, and being able to fade to complete black is sublime. But just as important is the ability to show bright scenes without the scene blowing out. Watching parts of the picture changing it's shadow detail depending on what else was being shown in the picture can get annoying. But again this was never mentioned or even discussed. Anyone questioning CRTs superiority was ridiculed and dismissed as a fool. Well i must of been a fool, as i continued to question every aspect of a projected image!

    Convergence, focus, brightness uniformity all need to be spot on to get the best out of any image. Most "mortal" CRTs struggled to achieve this, or at least maintain this. Warm up time meant planning in advance, and resisting the urge to pause the film to have a little tweak proved almost impossible!

    After a while, some people in the CRT forum decided i was a CRT hater, or a digital fanboy. This couldn't be further from the truth. I don't love or hate either technology. I hated DLP rainbows. I hate the fact even the best digitals cannot do perfect blacks. Screen door is no longer a problem as resolutions have risen, and most can now give a high contrast and very accurate colour picture. I just decided that digitals was the lesser of the two evils.

    I dumped the CRT upgrade plans and opted for one of the newer generation Marantz DLPs. The image was so much sharper and detailed. The colours where accurate, and convergence/focus was always perfect. Brightness uniformity across the screen meant the image was consistent during pans. I also managed to bag one of the first DVI/HDMI Pioneer DVD players in the country. Getting rid of the analogue connection brought another level of colour accuracy and sharpness. Because it was still only 720, screendoor was still a problem. Seating had to be moved back a bit to make it disappear. Some people de-focussed a bit, but to me this seemed to be defeating the point. Although good, it didn't do fade to black. But because the image was good in most other areas, i was very happy indeed. I even started watching whole films again :laugh:

    This must have come across, because other CRT owners started approaching me at CRT meets, and contacting me on the forums. They wanted to know more about my setup, and wanted to come and see it. The bizarre thing was that a lot didn't want this interest mentioning on the forum!!!
    It seems silly now, but we had some real CRT zealots who would bully anybody who questioned CRT. The forum was a lot smaller in those days, which meant everybody knew each other and often met. Slowly but surely digitals improved and people left CRT behind. CRT zealots couldn't understand that some people just wanted to be able to switch on the PJ and just watch a film. They some how forgot that the whole point of having a projector was to watch films. We may strive for perfection, but some also have families that meant a CRT wasn't practical.

    The very best CRT projectors can and still do give a fantastic picture. But all still have limitations, and are not perfect in every area. High resolution images need everything to be perfect, and sadly even these CRTs struggle. I would say that it fair to say they are not worth the effort anymore (evidently even for the CRT die-hards).

    Nowadays, i find i cannot even watch a CRT TV. Some can slate plasmas all they want, but the fact is they do give a better image overall than most CRT TVs. I saw a CRT TV just last week. It was a Sony Trinitron, and i only watched it as we were setting up a satellite system. The thing that struck me the most was the lack of focus. The picture jittered/twittered and lacked any kind of precision. The biggest turn off was the ever present flicker. I forgot just how bad it was.

    Any way, forget about all CRT flaws........they can do fade to black :suicide:
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2012
  30. kbfern

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    Great post Paul.:)
     

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