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How important is DV connection on a DVD recorder?

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by GadgetObsessed, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. GadgetObsessed

    GadgetObsessed
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    I'm considering either a Panny E95 or the new Panny EH50 DVD recorder - both of which are now about £330 - for copying my DV camcorder tapes to DVD.

    The main advantage of the older model (E95) for me is that it has DV-in whereas with the new model I would have to use S-video from my camcorder.

    Does using S-video result in a significant drop in PQ compared to DV-in?
     
  2. Benfica

    Benfica
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    There are pros & cons for each one (DV-in versus S-video).

    1) if you use DV-in

    - your video (DV-AVI), although converted to a more compressed format like MPEG2 (stantard for DVD), is converted in digital domain. There are no Digital to Analogue to Digital conversions. Just a digital to digtal convertion.

    - you will get a chapter mark for each timecode break in the miniDV tape (useful for editing)

    - you don't get time & date stamp.


    2) if you use S-Video

    - Video is converted from AVI to S-Video to MPEG2, wich involves digital to analogue to digital conversion. PQ should be worst. I've tested it for my self and I do find this method to hold a worst PQ. Others might well say that they don't see any diference.

    - you don't get a chapter mark for each timecode break in the miniDV tape

    - you can get time & date stamp if you play your tape with that thing turned on.

    Now ... I have a pioneer recorder (DVR-51000) and a Sony camcorder (DCR-PC330). I've copied around 26 miniDV tapes to my recorder using DV-in and produced a DVD-R for each tape (at highest quality - 1 hr / DVD).

    What can I say ? .... the PQ on the final DVD is amazing !

    HTH
     

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