how do you see the economy going in the next year or three?

richp007

Distinguished Member
Obviously you're all very very wrong on this.

Because the Brexiters never said food prices would rise. They wouldn't have dared be so heinous in a lie.
 

SpacekSissy

Distinguished Member
Food shopping wise do people go to multiple places or just go one place once a week and job done?

Trying to find a happy balance with my partner at the moment, we tend to go Saturday evenings to Tesco and spend on average £45-£50 a week. That being said it's a middle of the road food trolley not exactly cooking to Gordon Ramsey standards but also not eating ready meals and pot noodle sandwiches either.
I go to several different places. There are some places that do better than others in certain areas. For instance, Morrisons do a £1 loaf of a large Polish sourdough bread, which I wouldn't get elsewhere. And Iceland do an excellent fresh chicken, which is better than any chickens from the other shops. Coffee, again cheapest and best from Morrisons or ALDI, which are both ground coffee (I don't like instant) but half the price than other supermarkets. Wine and chocolate, cheapest and best from ALDI and for olives, Morrisons does a huge pot of them for £2.50. Yes, pricey but then olives are and it's a large pot (marinated in mediteranian herbs). I sometimes pop into Tesco (for convenience) and am horrified at the prices. Plus I just don't think their quality is that good.
 

LakieLady

Distinguished Member
Does anyone know if ALDI is still cheap? I'll have to make more effort to go there instead of Morrisons if so.

Aldi is cheap, but I don't know how it compares with Morrisons as we haven't got a Morrisons locally. There's one approx 10 miles away, but it's one of the ones that used to be a Safeway and it's so cramped and crowded that it does my head in, so I stopped going.
 

SpacekSissy

Distinguished Member
Aldi is cheap, but I don't know how it compares with Morrisons as we haven't got a Morrisons locally. There's one approx 10 miles away, but it's one of the ones that used to be a Safeway and it's so cramped and crowded that it does my head in, so I stopped going.
I hate Supermarket shopping full stop, but I have to go. Both Morrisons and ALDI are cramped round here, but since I don't drive, I have no choice but to go. I tried getting a food delivery from Morrisons but they didn't provide any bags, so it took me about half an hour unloading piece by piece, onto the floor and then piece by piece into the kitchen and decided - fudge that! For in future!
 

Boo Radley75

Distinguished Member
Food shopping wise do people go to multiple places or just go one place once a week and job done?

Trying to find a happy balance with my partner at the moment, we tend to go Saturday evenings to Tesco and spend on average £45-£50 a week. That being said it's a middle of the road food trolley not exactly cooking to Gordon Ramsey standards but also not eating ready meals and pot noodle sandwiches either.
I do a big fortnightly shop in three supermarkets- probably 60% in Aldi, 35% in Asda and 5% in Sainsburys. I have noticed the rise in prices. My fortnightly shop probably costs about £50 more now than it did a year or two ago. There is also usually a couple of items at a shop that you can't get in any of them. Haven't been able to get grapefruit or breakfast juice for a couple of months and last shop there was no garlic bread anywhere.
 

DJDave87

Active Member
Obviously you're all very very wrong on this.

Because the Brexiters never said food prices would rise. They wouldn't have dared be so heinous in a lie.

Strawman.

You should take at look at inflation rates across the EU and compare them with respective wage growth before insinuating this is a burden of brexit.

Id also point you to reports from the world bank and the FAO of the UN detailing 30%+ increases in the global food price index year on year and problems with food security resulting from covid.
 

VastGirth

Banned
Strawman.

You should take at look at inflation rates across the EU and compare them with respective wage growth before insinuating this is a burden of brexit.

Id also point you to reports from the world bank and the FAO of the UN detailing 30%+ increases in the global food price index year on year and problems with food security resulting from covid.

As fair as I'm aware food inflation in the EU is under 2%. So about 10 times less than in the UK.

At some point you guys are going to have to start accepting the impact brexit is having. It just makes you look really cultish by persisting with the denials.
 

DJDave87

Active Member
As fair as I'm aware food inflation in the EU is under 2%. So about 10 times less than in the UK.

At some point you guys are going to have to start accepting that brexit has had an impact. It just makes you look really cultish by persisting with the denials.

In germany its currently 4.9% year on year. Granted its not the EU but is the general benchmark, france are actually helping keep the EU figures lower, no surprises given the agricultural nature of their economy really.


Trading economics has uk food inflation at 0.8 year on year for september. What are you using for UK foods inflation figures?
 

VastGirth

Banned
In germany its currently 4.9% year on year. Granted its not the EU but is the general benchmark, france are actually helping keep the EU figures lower, no surprises given the agricultural nature of their economy really.


Trading economics has uk food inflation at 0.8 year on year for september. What are you using for UK foods inflation figures?


Plus personal experience from doing the weekly shop (gone up by around 15% - 20%), which corresponds with other forum members experiences.
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
Strawman.

You should take at look at inflation rates across the EU and compare them with respective wage growth before insinuating this is a burden of brexit.

Id also point you to reports from the world bank and the FAO of the UN detailing 30%+ increases in the global food price index year on year and problems with food security resulting from covid.

Is it a burden of Brexit. As it is Covid. As it globalisation. I'm not dismissing any of those points. This has already been established and spoken about many times here and elsewhere.

Strawmen need not apply.

Edit: I should add the only difference is Covid and globalisation didn't attempt to lie about it. And then we've got idiots like John Redwood running around saying we can be self sufficient.

Another lie.
 
D

Deleted member 51156

Guest
Food shopping wise do people go to multiple places or just go one place once a week and job done?

Trying to find a happy balance with my partner at the moment, we tend to go Saturday evenings to Tesco and spend on average £45-£50 a week. That being said it's a middle of the road food trolley not exactly cooking to Gordon Ramsey standards but also not eating ready meals and pot noodle sandwiches either.
We go to Aldi, farm shop, Polish/Lithuanian shop.
Every meal including chicken nuggets is cooked from scratch, Yorky puds, lasagne takes all day for sauce, and pasta is made by me.
She's brought a gigantic cabbage back home from the Polish shop.
That will do 3 meals, a soup, some cabbage pancakes, then finally cabbage with smoked ribs.
We don't eat cereals or biscuits, basically, any foods manufactured and full of sugar alternatives.
We both love cooking so imagination helps with being frugal.
 

niceguy1966

Distinguished Member
As fair as I'm aware food inflation in the EU is under 2%. So about 10 times less than in the UK.

At some point you guys are going to have to start accepting the impact brexit is having. It just makes you look really cultish by persisting with the denials.
Average inflation (not just food inflation) is 2% inside the EU. Here is a breakdown by country:
 

DJDave87

Active Member

Plus personal experience from doing the weekly shop (gone up by around 15% - 20%), which corresponds with other forum members experiences.


Theyre talking specifically about hospitality. An industry that spent most of last year shut down and heavily subsidised by the government (help out to eat out) of course there is significant inflation there.

Anecdotal evidence, feels, that sounds like a brexiteer approach that does.
Is it a burden of Brexit. As it is Covid. As it globalisation. I'm not dismissing any of those points. This has already been established and spoken about many times here and elsewhere.

Strawmen need not apply.

Edit: I should add the only difference is Covid and globalisation didn't attempt to lie about it. And then we've got idiots like John Redwood running around saying we can be self sufficient.

Another lie.

The jobs already taken yeh?

Have you deliberately worded it that way, theres no question mark?

And now you back track to clarify again. Really aggressive post being completely disingenuous and making out any given brexiter is a liar by trying to insinuate food price rises are a direct result of brexit when the reality couldnt be much further from the truth. As ive clearly shown. You didnt show that did you, why? And i clearly showed it with a one line sentence you couldnt be arsed googling.

Whos the liar?
 
D

Deleted member 51156

Guest
Back to the point, I believe pent-up demand and the current ripples are disguising the economic turmoil underneath.
The treasury can aid in stabilizing the economy, but I have a feeling they are going to suffocate the recovery inadvertently.
Budget day is approaching.
 

MrsArcanum

Member
Theyre talking specifically about hospitality. An industry that spent most of last year shut down and heavily subsidised by the government (help out to eat out) of course there is significant inflation there.

Anecdotal evidence, feels, that sounds like a brexiteer approach that does.


The jobs already taken yeh?

Have you deliberately worded it that way, theres no question mark?

And now you back track to clarify again. Really aggressive post being completely disingenuous and making out any given brexiter is a liar by trying to insinuate food price rises are a direct result of brexit when the reality couldnt be much further from the truth. As ive clearly shown. You didnt show that did you, why? And i clearly showed it with a one line sentence you couldnt be arsed googling.

Whos the liar?
Even CPI is running at 3.1% and is acknowledged to be flawed as it does not account for substitution by consumers switching to own brands rather than named.

Anyone who is brand loyal will see higher prices than the CPI. Brexit has had a direct impact on prices for EU imports. This will get worse when the UK finally starts charging the tariffs they are supposed to.
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
The jobs already taken yeh?

Have you deliberately worded it that way, theres no question mark?

And now you back track to clarify again. Really aggressive post being completely disingenuous and making out any given brexiter is a liar by trying to insinuate food price rises are a direct result of brexit when the reality couldnt be much further from the truth. As ive clearly shown. You didnt show that did you, why? And i clearly showed it with a one line sentence you couldnt be arsed googling.

Whos the liar?

I realise I messed my "is" and "it's" up a bit. Let me repeat it for you as it should have read.

"It is a burden of Brexit. As it is Covid. As it is globalisation. I'm not dismissing any of those points. This has already been established and spoken about many times here and elsewhere."

You seem to have taken extreme offence though for some reason. I thought it was obvious that I meant the Brexiters who lied about it. Mogg was one for starters. Redwood continues to every time he opens his mouth. That's why I originally wrote above "the" Brexiters, not just Brexiters.

If it wasn't clear then I've clarified that now and apologise for any offence caused.

However if you're actually trying to claim that Brexit isn't a contributory factor at all, then that's an argument I'm not even going to entertain.
 

MrsArcanum

Member
What tariffs are they, please?
My mistake. The problem stems from fewer imports from the EU creating shortages, that are not being replaced with imports from elsewhere.

EU imports are down 23%, rest of the world down 8%.
 

DJDave87

Active Member
I realise I messed my "is" and "it's" up a bit. Let me repeat it for you as it should have read.

"It is a burden of Brexit. As it is Covid. As it is globalisation. I'm not dismissing any of those points. This has already been established and spoken about many times here and elsewhere."

You seem to have taken extreme offence though for some reason. I thought it was obvious that I meant the Brexiters who lied about it. Mogg was one for starters. Redwood continues to every time he opens his mouth. That's why I originally wrote above "the" Brexiters, not just Brexiters.

If it wasn't clear then I've clarified that now and apologise for any offence caused.

However if you're actually trying to claim that Brexit isn't a contributory factor at all, then that's an argument I'm not even going to entertain.

Thats what youre falling back on 'the'. So brexiters means anyone who voted brexit and the brexiters means people you didnt mention? It always comes down to language doesnt it, my understanding of things, nothing at all to do with you being as clear as mud and somewhat goading.

Of course im not claiming that, brexit will have an impact on food prices (i thought that was obvious?!?!), the reality is the impact thats happening on food prices will be about 90% driven by covid (arbitrary number but one i believe to be fairly close) though. When youre seeing germany facing the exact same inflationary pressure as us if not worse there really is hardly any point in even looking at the brexit impact because its just not relevant. If our food was 20% up and german

Even CPI is running at 3.1% and is acknowledged to be flawed as it does not account for substitution by consumers switching to own brands rather than named.

Anyone who is brand loyal will see higher prices than the CPI. Brexit has had a direct impact on prices for EU imports. This will get worse when the UK finally starts charging the tariffs they are supposed to.

And now the numbers are fudged or unreliable? To the extent brand switching will have a massive impact on CPI?

The tables have fully turned. Pre brexit thats the kind of crap i was called a conspiracy theorist for suggesting.


You want the brexit impact? The bofe, the ONS literally everyone is reporting on it those problems just arent hard to see, youve spent the last (maybe not you mrsA, understand youre a more recent convert) few years pointing out every single potential pitfall, some with exemplary accuracy and oterhs have been wildly out. I mean i was supposed to be paying tariffs in janurary and planes where supposed to drop out of the sky and wont someone think of the data roaming charges!!!! Lets deal with the situations (that are actually really problems) weve actually got huh?
I realise I messed my "is" and "it's" up a bit. Let me repeat it for you as it should have read.

"It is a burden of Brexit. As it is Covid. As it is globalisation. I'm not dismissing any of those points. This has already been established and spoken about many times here and elsewhere."

You seem to have taken extreme offence though for some reason. I thought it was obvious that I meant the Brexiters who lied about it. Mogg was one for starters. Redwood continues to every time he opens his mouth. That's why I originally wrote above "the" Brexiters, not just Brexiters.

If it wasn't clear then I've clarified that now and apologise for any offence caused.

However if you're actually trying to claim that Brexit isn't a contributory factor at all, then that's an argument I'm not even going to entertain.

Of course I did, I thought you where obviously trying to cause offence. Relying on ‘the’ as your get out is clutching. That just wasn’t very clear and once again you try and blame my intelligence and lack of understanding.

In relation to the 30%+ increases in the global food price index over the last year it’s just not worth mentioning brexit. Doing so comes across disingenuous.
 

richp007

Distinguished Member
Thats what youre falling back on 'the'. So brexiters means anyone who voted brexit and the brexiters means people you didnt mention? It always comes down to language doesnt it, my understanding of things, nothing at all to do with you being as clear as mud and somewhat goading.

Of course im not claiming that, brexit will have an impact on food prices (i thought that was obvious?!?!), the reality is the impact thats happening on food prices will be about 90% driven by covid (arbitrary number but one i believe to be fairly close) though. When youre seeing germany facing the exact same inflationary pressure as us if not worse there really is hardly any point in even looking at the brexit impact because its just not relevant. If our food was 20% up and german



And now the numbers are fudged or unreliable? To the extent brand switching will have a massive impact on CPI?

The tables have fully turned. Pre brexit thats the kind of crap i was called a conspiracy theorist for suggesting.


You want the brexit impact? The bofe, the ONS literally everyone is reporting on it those problems just arent hard to see, youve spent the last (maybe not you mrsA, understand youre a more recent convert) few years pointing out every single potential pitfall, some with exemplary accuracy and oterhs have been wildly out. I mean i was supposed to be paying tariffs in janurary and planes where supposed to drop out of the sky and wont someone think of the data roaming charges!!!! Lets deal with the situations (that are actually really problems) weve actually got huh?


Of course I did, I thought you where obviously trying to cause offence. Relying on ‘the’ as your get out is clutching. That just wasn’t very clear and once again you try and blame my intelligence and lack of understanding.

In relation to the 30%+ increases in the global food price index over the last year it’s just not worth mentioning brexit. Doing so comes across disingenuous.

Well that's some chip you've got on your shoulder there Dave, even after I apologised.

And attacking what you saw as my antagonism with just more antagonism, is not exactly selling yourself as holding the moral high ground in this discussion.

I'll leave you to it, and so the thread can get back on track.
 

iFi audio

Member
AVForums Sponsor
CPI is indeed one of the core indicators measuring inflation. However, the index is far from perfect when measuring inflation or the cost of living.

The main culprit is the baskets goods selection methodology. It does not provide the sampling that represents all production or consumption in the economy. Moreover, the average household is a synthetically and arbitrarily selected hugely generalised group of people, who do not represent the consumption habits of the whole society.

You could say that one of its biggest advantages is that it is to some extent standardised so the cross-country comparisons have a common denominator.

Each item and category is weighted to measure what portion of an average household budget is dedicated to a particular category of products to identify the change in cost of living. The weight of each category and every item in it are different between countries because every country citizens spending habits differ. Some countries such as the US and the UK review their baskets annually, other countries more often than that.
 
Last edited:

birdseye

Standard Member
Since its inception, the Conservative Party has existed to protect and advance capital interests. That's its raison d'etre. The rest is smoke and mirrors: whatever illusion can be conjured to keep the Conservative Party in power to maintain that situation.
I dont agree with that comment but leaving that aside, what do you think the Labour Party exists for but to protect the interests of the "working class" and the unions? Why can the Labour party exist purely to benefit its voters as they repeatedly claim and the other party not do the same.
 

brunation

Well-known Member
Shrinkflation:

Noticed Kellogs Fruit'N'Fibre was reduced in size from 750g to 700g. Haven't bought it in over a year so don't know when it happened but it has shrunk.
 

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