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How do YOU make toast - Alternatives methods?

Tempest

Distinguished Member
Been having some toast recently, and must say quite enjoy it.

The thing is, an Electric Toaster just does not seem to produce toast that's really nice and crispy, without burning it.

In ye-old days, my gran had an ancient old Gas cooker with the narrow grill at the top for toasting, and as I recall that was much much nicer.
I have an elective double oven, and would be crazy to heat all that up just for a couple of slices.

So do you have any advice on how to create, nicely cooked, crispy but not burned toast?
Perhaps do something to the bread early to get it ready for toasting?

Special bread ( I bought some bread for toasting - thick slice)
Some different type of toaster?

Welcome suggestions :)
 

DPinBucks

Distinguished Member
Does your double oven not have a grill in the top section? Be unusual if it didn’t. OTOH, I find a toaster does perfectly good toast.
 

Dony

Distinguished Member
Do you have a grill?

For convenience I use a toaster, but if I'm making one of my speciality manwiches I'll use the grill and only toast one side.
 

Tempest

Distinguished Member
Well, my top oven section has heating elements on the top, so I'm sure I could use it.
It just feels like it would be an immense waste of power getting it all up to heat just for two slices of toast.
I know you can buy some high end toasters that are supposed to work better, but kinda feel that's probably just not true. Not that I've ever tried one.
Wondered if it's worth perhaps drying a couple of slices out if I plan on having them later.
If it's the moisture in the bread that stops it being nice and crispy.
In the toaster it seems the outside will burn before the inside is done.
 

Steve N

Distinguished Member
I'd like to know how to get it like hotels do it.
Golden brown, but softish not crispy?
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
I have a Dualit, it's probably the best toaster I've had.

The toast made on a gas grill as Tempest describes is far better.
 

MrSossidge

Distinguished Member
Toasting fork and open fire is good. Also under the big heavy lids of an aga.
 

DemonAV

Distinguished Member
I use my trusty Talky Toaster. Not only does it produce excellent grilled bread products it's great for a bit of light banter in the mornings.
 
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Cjultra

Novice Member
The caption made me laugh. When we were kids we used to nick slices of Sunblest (white bread to the younger lot on here...lol) that were thrown out for the birds as we lived in a square with back lawns down one side and parking on the other 3 with gardens and pavement in the middle. Anyway, we’d place them on Gas boiler vents on the outside of the houses. The vents were rectangular and jutted out a few inches then an angle to the middle, angle underneath; you get the gist. We then waited until they got crispy and toasty....
Crazy thinking now that’s what we did in the 70’s....lol
Anyone fancy recreating this option, nice gas flavoured Toast....Mmmmm 🤪🥪......lol
 

hyperfish

Distinguished Member
I use a bog standard toaster. Leaving the toast in place for 5 minutes after it has popped up dries it enough to make it crisp.
 

nvingo

Well-known Member
Toaster at home.
Gas grill in the motorhome.
Crumpets with a fork over an open coal fire, before we had glass-door fires (I suppose we could open the door!)
Best toast was the inch-thick doorstops served at the work canteen circa 1990, before it closed in favour of vending machines.
 

EarthRod

Distinguished Member
I too use a bog standard toaster. Pop it up half-way through and turn the nearly done toast over, then back down for the rest of the toasting. Keep an eye on it and just before it starts to blacken, pop it up and remove the toast immediately.

Then let the toast cool down in a rack before buttering. That way I get incredibly crisp and crunchy toast.
 
In our dualit toaster I just use the marked timer on the dial. And if I want to get it extra crispy throughout I just leave it in there for another 30 seconds after it is switched off. That does the trick. Never creates blackened toast for us.

I only use the grill in the oven for when I top my bread with cheese, and other toppings.
 

BT Bob

Well-known Member
Dualit works for us - very simple to operate, great design, built like a tank ( if not cheap).

I'd like to know how to get it like hotels do it.
Golden brown, but softish not crispy?
The hotel toaster is a constant source of amazement to me.
No two hotel toasters are the same - ANYWHERE in the world.
Even in a hotel where there are 2 or more identical machines with the settings the same, they'll make different toast.
I've even seen 4 Dualit 4-slice toasters the same as mine at home and each one was different!!
There must be a law for it....
 

lee1980

Active Member
We have a Bosch, and at first sure it was more even burning but now its random, sure after a few cycles the elements must be off already like.
Dualit do a 3 slot one but its like £150!
 
We have a Bosch, and at first sure it was more even burning but now its random, sure after a few cycles the elements must be off already like.
Dualit do a 3 slot one but its like £150!
Become a savvy buyer, I got a 4 slot stainless steel one for less than that iirc. They are worth it, and last. Ours is about 20 years old now and going strong.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
Also the parts that do wear out can be cheaply bought and easily replaced such as the filaments and timer.

I also bought the matching kettle to go with my toaster. It got returned as it didn't match properly and it did not feel anywhere worth the price compared to the toaster.

On a sidenote I'd also avoid the sandwich cages to make toasted sandwiches. Unless you're using very skinny slices of bread and putting tiny amounts between them they don't fit the standard toaster slots at all.
 

jaipal2004

Well-known Member
a far out alternative is ‘tava-toast’ as we’d call it (Indian origin).....

Plain white bread, buttered both sides and then into a large frying pan (no need for any oil). Heat on both sides until it resembles toast.

obviously this will give you a ‘limp’ piece of toast but some masala beans and it’ll taste lovely
 
a far out alternative is ‘tava-toast’ as we’d call it (Indian origin).....

Plain white bread, buttered both sides and then into a large frying pan (no need for any oil). Heat on both sides until it resembles toast.

obviously this will give you a ‘limp’ piece of toast but some masala beans and it’ll taste lovely
Hahaha when going through that kind of trouble you may as well use up stale bread and make French Toast yum yum :)
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
a far out alternative is ‘tava-toast’ as we’d call it (Indian origin).....

Plain white bread, buttered both sides and then into a large frying pan (no need for any oil). Heat on both sides until it resembles toast.

obviously this will give you a ‘limp’ piece of toast but some masala beans and it’ll taste lovely
That's pretty much how I make a decent toasted sandwich, only there's filling inbetween, obviously.
 

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