how do I improve on 1:2 macro?

Discussion in 'Photography Forums' started by Wingless Garuda, Apr 28, 2007.

  1. Wingless Garuda

    Wingless Garuda
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    I'm looking for some advice. I've got an old, manual focus/manual aperture Vivitar 135mm f2.8 Macro cheaply on the bay (well, I believe it's macro. The lens just says 'close focusing' but the lens barrel is marked and shows that it goes down to 1:2). I thought that 1:2 would get me well into macro territory, but as you can see from the piccie of the 50p piece it doesn't get me terribly far into macro - the shot is full frame. So to get pictures of insects, I will have to extract partial frames.

    Camera = Pentax k100d

    I want to get insect shots, so should I:

    a. get extension tubes and use them with this lens (or the standard 18-55 zoom). OR
    b. get a proper 1:1 macro lens like the Pentax D-FA 100mm Macro, or the Tamron 90mm Macro?

    Thanks for any advice

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Brammers

    Brammers
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    Get one of these!!!

    http://www.pbase.com/pganzel/maxxum_3x1x_macro

    Seriously, get a macro lens. Either of the 2 suggested should be fine, I have no knowledge of the Pentax one though. There's also Sigma's range of macro lenses which should be available in Pentax flavour, I think they do 50, 75, 105 and 180mm macro lenses.

    Macro actually starts at 1:1 magnification. With the age of close focusing zooms, someone started to mark them 'macro' and nowdays even my ultra-zoom Sigma claims to be a macro lens at 1:5.3 magnification. Your Vivitar gains respect from me by only claiming to be close focus - something the majority of 'macro zooms' are today. A true macro zoom is the one I posted above!

    Tubes are fine, but they're very unwieldy and the lens is likely to end up very close to the subject. Most people prefer to keep a degree of distance between the end of the lens and their subject to avoid disturbing insects etc. Tubes will make this difficult to achieve.
     
  3. Biscuit761

    Biscuit761
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    I have had some quite good results from my £4.99 ebay screw on macro filter

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    Bill
     
  4. Wingless Garuda

    Wingless Garuda
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    Thanks chaps,

    Food for thought. Biscuit, especially like the tadpole picture :thumbsup:
     

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