How can I rename my hard drive from F: to C:on my new Shuttle?

I

indytim

Guest
I've just built myself a new PC using a Shuttle SN25P barebones system. The PC went together fine but upon completing the installation of Windows XP I discovered the hard drive had been named drive F:, because the C: drive is actually one of the unit's card readers.

Therefore, does anyone know of a quick and easy way to rename the hard drive from F to C, as this has already caused a couple of issues?

Thanks,
Tim
 

semiskimmed

Distinguished Member
right click my computer, click manage, disc management, right click drive you want to change and then select change drive letter or parameters or something
 

vileda

Standard Member
Make sure you have all the cd's for your applications to hand as this can cause issues
 

colinwheeler

Active Member
Oh indeed, carefull of this one if you have installed software because just changing the drive assignment won't change the registry settings or shortcuts for installed applications. I would say, reinstall and before you start remove any other drives and or card readers, either by unplugging them or by disabling them in the bios.
 
B

Big Jim

Guest
I'm running an SN25 - fine choice! I would reinstall for the sake of the pain that changing your systemroot drive letter can cause.

When you rebuild, unplug the card reader before installation and only plug it back in when windows is up - happy drive letters ahoy!
 

lightbulb

Novice Member
Does Partition Magic allow you to change the drive letter and all references to the old drive letter throughout the system? I know it does this when merging 2 partitions on the same disk into one primary partition. Can't remember if there was a standalone option for it.
 
best off reinstalling but remove the card reader first then the harddrive will be the default C: drive...worked for me, if you have a decent bios management then you should be able to sort this, but what do you expect with a shuttle...almost as bad as a gigabyte mobo..
 

HMHB

Distinguished Member
I would also re-install. I had this kind of problem a few years ago when I installed XP when there was an internal Zip drive attached, the Zip drive became the C drive and messed up the installation. As someone else has said, disconnect any other drives and it will default to C.
 
uridium said:
Nowt wrong with Gigabyte!

..........last two ASUS boards I've bought were DOA though!
Gigabyte make cheapo boards with very limited bios management, on the other hand if you grap an asus with the AMI bios, then your sorted...you can map a SATA as you primary hard drive on startup and IDE as secondary..
 

Uridium

Well-known Member
going off topic here but i guess you've not seen the BIOS on any recent Gigabyte boards or haven't found the hidden advanced BIOS options on one.

My K8N Sli Pro has pages full of OC'ing options and I have an SATA drive as Primary boot and an IDE as secondary!

Also boots from a USB pen into linux when I feel like it as well.

http://www.overclock.co.uk/customer/product.php?productid=18849

now if it was a PCChips or ECS board then i would agree with you about being cheap and nasty:)
 

apolloa

Distinguished Member
He he, I've seen this problem loads, blame MS for there inept drive lableing. Best of UNPLUGING the card readers etc and reinstalling your windows. You can change the drive letter to C if you go through the registry but there are a few entrys to change although I have done it on Windows 2000 before.
Thats the only way to change the drive letter because the drive windows sits on is not designed to have it's letter changed.
 
apolloa said:
He he, I've seen this problem loads, blame MS for there inept drive lableing. Best of UNPLUGING the card readers etc and reinstalling your windows. You can change the drive letter to C if you go through the registry but there are a few entrys to change although I have done it on Windows 2000 before.
Thats the only way to change the drive letter because the drive windows sits on is not designed to have it's letter changed.

I just put it down to bios management, I had an IBM machine, think there was an intel board in there, and i could not map my SATA Drive as my priamry drive wihtout removing all other drives, but then got an Asus with the AMIbios and it's all fine..so anytime I buy a M/B I buy an Asus with the AMI bios..
 
uridium said:
going off topic here but i guess you've not seen the BIOS on any recent Gigabyte boards or haven't found the hidden advanced BIOS options on one.

My K8N Sli Pro has pages full of OC'ing options and I have an SATA drive as Primary boot and an IDE as secondary!
Not seen any new gigabytes, last one I looked at was a socket 462 board..:D , but they are still a cheapo manufacturer...why buy Gigabyte when you can get Asus..:)
 

semiskimmed

Distinguished Member
i kind of agree with the gigabyte boards being a bit cack.
theyre great if you just plan to run everything at stock.
if you fancy a little overclocking though you will struggle, the boards volatge manipulation is meant to be non existant really. it will only allow a very slight change in vdimm and cpu voltages so im led to believe, hence stopping really high overclocking.
 

Uridium

Well-known Member
guess i'm just keen on gigabyte kit as i've never had any probs with it. also running 2 gigabyte vga cards as well.

maybe i'll try another asus next time and have better luck with it.
 

fathazza

Active Member
i had the same problem and have just ended up leaving it...

my problem was that even when i had only one hdd (and no card readers etc) that it always assigned C: to a a partition full of data i cant do lose, and completely ignored my windows partition...

i dont think you can blame gigabyte for this problem, it is totally down to Windows being dense....tho it doesnt really make that much difference apart from aestheitcally and the fact that my windows installation is now on F:.

only gigabyte board ive ever had was a bx1000, most stable board ive ever owned... Presently running a DFI NF4 Sli dr
 

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