Household isolation rules

Lee

Moderator
There is something in the household isolation rules that doesn't seem right to me and could be adding to infection rates.

The diagram in this article says that child 2 can come out of isolation even though dad has just presented with the virus.

The government guidance backs that up as being correct...

Returning to your normal routine
If you remain well, you can return to your normal routine at the end of the 14-day period. You do not need to isolate for longer than 14 days, even if other household members develop symptoms during this period. However, the person with new symptoms should now self-isolate for 10 days. People in the household who remain well after 14 days are unlikely to be infectious.

My lad and I are isolating for 14 days from when my other lad had symptoms but that looks to be wrong and we should only isolate for the 14 days from when my wife had symptoms.

I can not think why, in the example in the article, child 2 isn't at risk for the 14 days after dad had symptoms. Am I missing something?


 
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Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
More Government nonsense that makes no sense.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
I'm "guessing" that as you've been exposed for a fortnight to it and shown no symptoms then either you've had it asymptomatically previously or during that period so there's no further need to isolate.
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
Is this all subject to change soon with the new testing factilities? There has been rumours NHS workers will now have different 'rules' with the ability to be tested daily? Is this just rubbish?
 

HelloShaun

Active Member
We are 9 months into this virus and they still have not got testing sorted. It has been the root of many of the problems we've endured.

The government should have moved to allowing anyone to have a test whenever they wanted, in fact I feel strongly that they should have simply given a payment (£5) to any that did and let them do so once a fortnight/month.
Instead they make people tell lies to get a test.

But before that we need to have a test that can be trusted and the rapid test has issues:

The rapid lateral flow tests work by taking a nose and throat swab, shaking it in fluid until any viral particles come off, and then dropping the fluid onto a plastic stick. They take about half an hour to show a result.
Some councils have raised concerns over their use, with Greater Manchester councils the latest to pause rapid testing for care home visitors.
Prof Jon Deeks, of Birmingham University, said lateral flow tests could not detect low levels of the virus and were being used in ways for which they were never intended.
"We can't see why the government is progressing with using this test when it is missing so many people," he told the BBC.
"They have been sold to people with the idea that if you are negative you will be able to go and visit people, you will be able to be clear that you haven't got Covid, and that is really dangerous."

and

 

weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Is this all subject to change soon with the new testing factilities? There has been rumours NHS workers will now have different 'rules' with the ability to be tested daily? Is this just rubbish?

My wife is an NHS Staff Nurse and was given 25 rapid tests 2 weeks ago and told to perform two tests each week and submit the result online (she’s at Arrowe Park Hospital on the Wirral). If she tests positive, she has to inform her Matron and not go to work. However, at the same time, if she’s exposed to someone else who has tested positive, she’s been advised that she shouldn’t isolate, and should instead continue to work (as they can’t afford for multiple staff to be off due to potential infection).
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
My wife is an NHS Staff Nurse and was given 25 rapid tests 2 weeks ago and told to perform two tests each week and submit the result online (she’s at Arrowe Park Hospital on the Wirral). If she tests positive, she has to inform her Matron and not go to work. However, at the same time, if she’s exposed to someone else who has tested positive, she’s been advised that she shouldn’t isolate, and should instead continue to work (as they can’t afford for multiple staff to be off due to potential infection).


Ridiculous.
 

JimmyMac

Distinguished Member
My wife is an NHS Staff Nurse and was given 25 rapid tests 2 weeks ago and told to perform two tests each week and submit the result online (she’s at Arrowe Park Hospital on the Wirral). If she tests positive, she has to inform her Matron and not go to work. However, at the same time, if she’s exposed to someone else who has tested positive, she’s been advised that she shouldn’t isolate, and should instead continue to work (as they can’t afford for multiple staff to be off due to potential infection).


That’s interesting because my wife works at the royal Liverpool. She has the same tests that she has to do twice a week. However if she or any of her colleagues are exposed to someone who tests positive they follow the same rule as anyone else. She’s a department head and is struggling with the amount that have been off isolating due to being in contact with people that have had a positive result

Strange for arrowe to have such a policy when RLBUHT gave a different policy yet are under more strain

Edit : possible crossed wires now I think of it. If exposed to a patient that has a positive result but have been wearing PPE then yes the directive is not to isolate. However if in home life or contacted by track and trace due to visiting somewhere outside of work with positive exposure then rules are the same as for joe public
 
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weaviemx5

Distinguished Member
Edit : possible crossed wires now I think of it. If exposed to a patient that has a positive result but have been wearing PPE then yes the directive is not to isolate. However if in home life or contacted by track and trace due to visiting somewhere outside of work with positive exposure then rules are the same as for joe public

Sorry, I should have clarified this point. Yes, if exposed to patients who test positive, the rule is to not isolate.
 

JimmyMac

Distinguished Member
Sorry, I should have clarified this point. Yes, if exposed to patients who test positive, the rule is to not isolate.

Apologies, read it wrong initially, thanks for clarifying

To my mind it’s the right thing, otherwise every hospital would be shut by now due to lack of staff. My mum returns to arrowe soon to work following her shielding so will be getting the tests

Fun watching the wife do her self tests, she’s spent half a year swabbing others but still can’t handle doing her own :rotfl:
 

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