Hounding people for private political views

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Deleted member 13294

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BBC Sport - Paolo Di Canio refuses to answer fascism questions

Am I the only one disgusted by the incessant media hounding going on with Paolo Di Canio?

He has done nothing illegal. So long as his political views don't come influence how he does his job I couldn't care less what he believes in.

Of course it is all the more ironic that it is the mostly lefty liberal media which are the most intolerant here, and trying to hound a man out of his job for private political views.
 

karkus30

Banned
Squiffy said:
BBC Sport - Paolo Di Canio refuses to answer fascism questions

Am I the only one disgusted by the incessant media hounding going on with Paolo Di Canio?

He has done nothing illegal. So long as his political views don't come influence how he does his job I couldn't care less what he believes in.

Of course it is all the more ironic that it is the mostly lefty liberal media which are the most intolerant here, and trying to hound a man out of his job for private political views.
BBC on fascism

Fascism in Italy also had corporatism ingrained in is political make-up. Corporatism is usually defined as a political and economic system where individuals are organised into different groups - for example "plumbers" or "priests" - within the state, negotiating with other groups to make progress.

Some activists would accept the fascist label while others eschew it
It is unlike a modern liberal democracy where the basic political unit is the individual. The corporatist model emphasises co-operation over competition.
Another characteristic associated with fascism is autarky - the self-sufficient economy. But by no means all modern autarkic states - Afghanistan under the Taliban, for example - have been widely classed as fascist.
Fascist symbols are also significant. The term derives from the "fasces" - the axe and bundle of rods used in ancient Rome - sported by Mussolini's fascists. Franco's Falangists, used arrows joined by a yoke, the symbol of Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand. The Nazis used a Swastika. Symbols that in some way echo these older motifs are common among some modern extremists.


Believes in Co-operation over competition, self sufficiency, removing the individuality for the good of the society and the use of symbols.......hmm, who do I know that has those traits ?
 

EarthRod

Distinguished Member
Believes in Co-operation over competition, self sufficiency, removing the individuality for the good of the society and the use of symbols.......hmm, who do I know that has those traits ?
I don't know - who has these traits?


:D
 

pragmatic

Distinguished Member
From troll to fascist, who would have thought it. Maybe in-line with the OP many of us on here are guilty of this.
 

karkus30

Banned
Alan CD said:
I don't know - who has these traits?

:D
It goes back to those using the word 'fascist' as an insult. No one really knows what a fascist is. There is no easy answer. They sound like socialists. Indeed Mussolini was a socialist before he became a fascist but you would be hard pressed to spirit the difference. Anything authoritarian is a bad thing as far as I'm concerned, worse if it destroys individualism, spreads racism and uses violence to achieve obedience.
 

MikeTV

Well-known Member
Making people accountable for promoting fascist beliefs publicly, would be more reflective description of the events, than the actual thread title.
 
D

Deleted member 13294

Guest
Making people accountable for promoting fascist beliefs publicly, would be more reflective description of the events, than the actual thread title.
He isn't promoting anything. It was a small part of a long interview back in 2005. It is nothing to do with the job he has taken or his ability to do it.

No more than he would need to be made accountable if he was a communist.
 

kav

Distinguished Member
What I find weird is he was with Swindon (I think) for a while and none of this stuff came up. Why now, with Sunderland? Is there a vendetta somewhere that's not been publicised?
 

NewMan

Well-known Member
What I find weird is he was with Swindon (I think) for a while and none of this stuff came up. Why now, with Sunderland? Is there a vendetta somewhere that's not been publicised?
As Bill Turnbull pointed out this morning, the former Foreign Secretary wasn't on the board of Swindon...
 

NewMan

Well-known Member
I'm not saying it's a good reason, mind - just a reason...

Though I find it odd that the Miliband Resignation has been made to appear to coincide with DiCanio's appointment, when surely he'd have been resigning anyway for his fancy new job in New York... :confused:
 

Wild Weasel

Well-known Member
I don't see any difference between Di Canio's politics and the Miliband family's Marxist background. They're both equally stupid.
 

krish

Distinguished Member
Hounding people for private political views
Of course it is all the more ironic that it is the mostly lefty liberal media which are the most intolerant here, and trying to hound a man out of his job for private political views.
Since he's already very publicly declared his political views (interview/autobiography/specific hand gestures), when he could have just shut his mouth, how exactly does this apply to Paolo Di Canio?

Surely that makes him fair game?
 
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D

Deleted member 13294

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krish said:
Since he's already very publicly declared his political views (interview/autobiography/specific hand gestures), when he could have just shut his mouth, how exactly does this apply to Paolo Di Canio?

Surely that makes him fair game?
So views and political beliefs which are completely unrelated to the ability to do a job should disqualify someone from their chosen profession?

He hasn't incited violence or racial hatred, he hasn't actually said anything political in relation to his current employment. And whatever he may have said or done was in the past and nothing to do with managing Sunderland AFC.

I'm amazed anyone can look at this media furore and not be disturbed by it.

To coin that old phrase, I may not agree with someones views but I will defend their right to say it.

And I will definitely defend their right to gainful employment unsullied by completely unrelated remarks they may have made in years past.
 
D

Deleted member 13294

Guest
don't change the goal posts .... or, if you do, edit your thread title and OP
- he is NOT being hounded for private political views
Whether or not you agree that his views are private or not, there is no doubt he is being hounded.

And the main point is that these views/comments are legal, unrelated to his job, and well in the past.

Do you think it is appropriate that his job should be under threat as it is in this way? Is that really fair game?
 

krish

Distinguished Member
If the press are breaking the law with their 'hounding' then it should be dealt with appropriately.

If he is in full compliance with his contract's terms and conditions and the terms of his professional bodies (FA/FIFA?) then he his job should be safe or he can take legal action for unfair dismissal.

He certainly needs to get in front of the issue, since he was a grown man in a high profile sports career when he very publicly made three types of political statements that are undoubtedly controversial (and in the case of the salutes possibly illegal in Italy).

I absolutely value the right to free speech and a free press. I'm not sure his employers are abandoning him yet, though the PR nightmare could be influencing them. As an adult he must be prepared for the consequences of whatever choices he makes, especially if he chooses to execute them publicly.
 

Jamezinho

Distinguished Member
What I find weird is he was with Swindon (I think) for a while and none of this stuff came up. Why now, with Sunderland? Is there a vendetta somewhere that's not been publicised?
I thought the same when I first heard about this. Obviously di Canio is now in a bigger spotlight as a Premier League manager, but the point remains.

Also, if his views were at the far left of the political spectrum do you think the same fuss would have ensued?
 

sidicks

Banned
Why is asking someone to justify their views 'hounding' them?
Do we ask all football managers to justify their views?

What about other sports stars or actors or musicians or bankers or....
:confused:
 

Jamezinho

Distinguished Member

pandemic

Well-known Member
Nothing unusual here it's normal in football, making controversial comments publicly is going to comeback at some point.
Remember, Glen Hoddle's comments concerning his beliefs and the disabled, that led to him losing the England management role.
The modern game is not just about the sport, but also the image of the game and the press are going to exploit that when it suits them or their readership.

PS. I don't think he is being hounded though, I've only read articles on the topic a couple of times.
 
D

Deleted member 13294

Guest
pandemic said:
PS. I don't think he is being hounded though, I've only read articles on the topic a couple of times.
Just an hour ago, second highest sports story on the BBC news website is another story about some quotes by Shaka Hislop that Di Canio needs to justify his views.

Why on earth would a comment by a retired goalkeeper of no particular renown be the second ranked story?

Seems that certain elements of the left wing media are determined to keep this story going until Di Canio is sacked.
 

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