Hot/cold and hybrid roof driving me nuts

maverick177uk

Distinguished Member
I have a flat garage roof with a rubber surface, I’m going to convert my garage and looking at the different ways of insulating. If you look through the garage the beams run left to right with the house on one side attached and on the other it’s attached to the neighbours garage. Looking at all the different ways the easiest seems to be put 100mm Kingspan pushed up against the roof, then from front to back attach wooden battens leaving a gap for airflow then plasterboard, at the front end over the garage door (I’m leaving in place) I was going to put a few trickle vents, to allow air to circulate front to back between the plasterboard and the insulation above. Would this be sufficient? I’ve just looked at a you tube video which talks about hybrid where you do this put a vapour barrier above the plasterboard and this negates the need for ventilation as the air in between stays at the ambient temperature of the room!
All the builders I’ve got in to look at it haven’t mentioned any of this, am I overthinking it? The other alternative seems to be leave a 50mm gap at the top drill noggins through the beams to trickle vents at the end, the insulation would be underneath and then wooden batons plasterboard, however this cuts down head too a lot more and wouldn’t be my first choice.
Bearing in mind that I will have speakers in the ceiling as well the first option but without a vapour barrier as I would potentially be cutting into that.
 

cmclean

Active Member
Could you maybe use TLX silver instead of the 100mm kingspan which would be cheaper and you could then batten and plasterboard and wouldn’t loose as much headroom

You could then possibly cut through plasterboard for ceiling speakers but not have to cut through the TLX which would maintain the insulation
 

maverick177uk

Distinguished Member
Could you maybe use TLX silver instead of the 100mm kingspan which would be cheaper and you could then batten and plasterboard and wouldn’t loose as much headroom

You could then possibly cut through plasterboard for ceiling speakers but not have to cut through the TLX which would maintain the insulation
What about creating the airflow though? How can I do it, it seems the only way I can create that front to back is drilling holes in the beams but that could affect integrity.
 

maverick177uk

Distinguished Member
Well I think I’ve solved this basically build a room within a room, lower the ceiling by building a false insulated ceiling leaving the original above with a gap for ventilation.
 

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