Homeplug Connection Issue

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by SGilly, Feb 16, 2014.

  1. SGilly

    SGilly
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    Hello guys,

    New to forum and yet another homeplug dropping connection issue but I don't think this one is straight forward so hope you all can shed some light

    I have in total 6 homeplugs around the house connecting everything from smart tv's, DVR system and server

    In the attic of the house is the DVR system and the server, the problem is the server homeplug drops off the network intermittently can range from every 1-5 days

    I have to manually go up in the attic and turn the homeplug off and on again and it connects right away

    I can't understand this as the DVR system has never dropped it's connection despite also being in the attic

    There is two mains plugs in the attic, one has a 6 way adaptor which powers the DVR, UPS for server, tv booster and the homeplug for the DVR system

    The other mains plug simply has the homeplug for the server as I thought having it in a mains socket would provide better signal to the router downstairs

    Anyone have any ideas?

    It definetly drops all connection as I can't ping my server, when I go up to restart the homeplug the power light is on and the device light is on meaning a connection between the plug and server is working but the network connection light is off, simple switch off and on and works again

    Any help would be greatly appreciated

    Thanks
     
  2. mickevh

    mickevh
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    If I'm reading your right, your DVR and server are co-located..?

    If so, I don't think you need a HomePlugs for each, you could deploy a small ethernet switch (or a crippled "router" if you have an old one lying around) downstream of the working HomePlug and plug the ethernet cables for both DVR and server into said switch.

    Cheap ethernet switches are only a few pounds these day and the cost difference between 10/100 and 10/100/1000 (Gigabit) switches is so small I'd buy the latter even if I didn't have any Gigabit devices (yet.) If you do any transfers between DVR and server, it'll probably be faster with this regime.

    Decreasing your HomePlug count will also decrease their contention for use of the mains which should also give a bit of performance increase.
     
  3. SGilly

    SGilly
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    Thanks for the advise, I've ordered two gigabit switches.

    One for the server/DVR and one for the living room which has smart tv, Apple TV, divco and sky

    I would assume this would increase bandwidth on the lines?

    Having trouble streaming from the server to smart tv's and trying to work out if it's CPU or bandwidth related
     
  4. charles_b

    charles_b
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    That should certainly help. Homeplugs share the bandwidth across the mains between them. A simplistic way to describe this is that you divide the rating by the number of plugs, the duplex and then apply a realistic real world performance.

    So 200Mbps plugs will share that bandwidth across the number in use, and of course they are all halfduplex, so that means that it's not 200Mbps for transmission and 200Mbps for receive, it's 200Mbps for both (100Mbps each way)

    In the real world, you will almost never get the rated connection (200Mbps) due to overheads, noisy mains, distance etc.. If you get 50% of that, you are doing extremely well. So taking that into account:

    2 x homeplugs/halfduplex = 100Mbps theoretical ( 50Mbps allowing for overheads...)
    3 x homeplugs = 66 Mbps (33Mbps )
    6 x homeplugs = 33 Mbps (16Mbps )

    Of course that assumes they're all using the same powerline network, but you can see that the headline rate of 200Mbps is really a maximum of 50Mbps in the real world, with just 2 plugs

    Jaw dropping when you look at it closely. Shame the manufaturers don't like to tell you that.
     

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