Home renovation

Discussion in 'Smart Home, Climate Control & Security Forum' started by andyuk, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. andyuk

    andyuk
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    765
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Gloucester
    Ratings:
    +22
    Hi, we are just starting a complete home renovation. As the electrics and heating etc will all be brand new i am wanting to get some good "smart tech" to control lightning & heating etc without breaking the bank.

    I am currently thinking "Hive" however ideally need some spotlights for lightning.

    Do i go for the Hive or Hue style lights although i don't think Hive do spotlights? Or do i go the Lightwaverf sockets route? Obviously budget is a big factor!

    Any electricians or people in the know help me that would be great! Please feel free to PM if needed.

    Thanks
    Andy
     
  2. chrisfraser05

    chrisfraser05
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    419
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    Location:
    aberdeen
    Ratings:
    +207
    I think you're doing yourself a huge injustice if you go down any of the routes you mention.

    Personally I'd recommend using zwave modules behind whatever standard switches you choose to use.

    Zwave allows you to use the lights normally from the switch but also automate them too.
    You then just use normal lights, specifying as you would normally.

    I'd ensure all the back boxes are deep (47mm) and that you make sure the electricians put neutral wires to the switch boxes also.

    As long as you start from that position you can just add one module at a time if you want to.

    A single Zwave module controlling the light for a room can work out much cheaper than a couple of hue bulbs, and it is more reliable than lightwave.

    Lightwave can suffer interference, and there is no 2 way communication so if you turn it on locally your hub never knows.

    Zwave is a mesh network so technically you can extend it indefinitely. The more you have off it the better the reception. But the reception is fantastic straight out of the box.

    Lastly the choice of Zwave hubs is growing all the time, but the Fibaro and Vera units are the best at the moment and allow your to integrate with many other systems building a truly integrated home.

    Nothing worse than having to use multiple different apps when one app should control your entire home
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • List
  3. Member 581642

    Member 581642
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    11,106
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +2,501
    Totally agree with Chris

    We used to install LWRF and Loxone and now just about exclusively use Fibaro for our installs.

    Drop me a PM or email if you need some more information or a quotation
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • List
  4. Evostance

    Evostance
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    353
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +90
    Totally agree with the 2 comments above. Something I wish we did during our refurb was to put in 45mm backboxes so I could fit some Fibaro Relays etc behind them
     
  5. MonkeyJug

    MonkeyJug
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2004
    Messages:
    595
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Southampton
    Ratings:
    +74
    Does stuffing the modules into a smaller backbox contain any risk other than physical damage to the module? Some of my backboxes are 'dot and dab' plasterboard panels that are attached to breeze block walls. I've got one module currently installed, that seemed to fit in the standard metal backbox without much effort.

    Edit: Obviously I'm concerned by the possible risk of fire.
     
  6. Evostance

    Evostance
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    353
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +90
    Personally, I wouldn't cram anything with electrical connections into a small space. It puts strain on the wires and connections. When I was doing my house, I found the previous owners had done so, and when I removed the switch from the wall, the wires just fell out.

    Sounds like you have a similar setup to me. I had a 4 way switch with 2 way control fit in our kitchen and the sparkies had to drill out a whole in the breeze block just to get a suitable backbox in.
    This might be your only option.

    Also, don't forget that if you have flush switches, then you will have less room in your backbox, and if you have dimmers, you'll have even less room. I know for my standard dimmers in a 35mm backbox, there is hardly any room to spare
     
  7. MonkeyJug

    MonkeyJug
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2004
    Messages:
    595
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Southampton
    Ratings:
    +74
    :(

    I had already contemplated the prospect of having to do this! Looks like unfortunately, it may be my only option on some of the walls!
     
  8. Member 581642

    Member 581642
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    11,106
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +2,501
    If redecorating you could always add another backbox below the existing switch
     
  9. chrisfraser05

    chrisfraser05
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2015
    Messages:
    419
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    Location:
    aberdeen
    Ratings:
    +207
    Best practice you shouldn't cram it in.

    Personally in my own house, I've done it once.
    I was using a module which only used a 3v supply on the switch side so I was able to use equipment wire for that and get all the 240 side and module sitting nicely in the back.
     
  10. Member 581642

    Member 581642
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    11,106
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +2,501
    You can potentially wire the modules into the ceiling void as well, rather than behind the Light Switch but obvioulsy harder for wiring as you still need to run wires to and from the light switch to the modules
     
  11. zmohtat

    zmohtat
    Novice Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2015
    Messages:
    18
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Leicester
    Ratings:
    +1
    Hi see my pictures of my house. I got my whole house gutted out. Hopefully you get some inspiration. pjimage.jpg
     
  12. ShortLass

    ShortLass
    Novice Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2016
    Messages:
    6
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    4
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire, UK
    Ratings:
    +0
    Nice TV stand / shelf thingy
     
  13. zmohtat

    zmohtat
    Novice Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2015
    Messages:
    18
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Leicester
    Ratings:
    +1
    Thank you....appreciate it
     
  14. SeriesLandy

    SeriesLandy
    Novice Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2016
    Messages:
    9
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Portsmouth
    Ratings:
    +2
    Looking good.
    Do you have any more shots of the tv room? What have you used behind the tv as it looks really smart!
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice