Home Network????

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by Lance2000, Feb 13, 2009.

  1. Lance2000

    Lance2000
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    Hi all got a few questions regarding home networking.

    I am currently rewiring my house and a friend suggested installing a home network / data cables at the same time.

    Trying to decide what the benefits would be i.e. wireless V wired?

    What are the limitations with each method?

    If wired then what cable CAT 5 / 6 / 7 or Fibre?

    And what other items would i need?

    Any help or direction would be appreciated

    Regards

    :lease:
     
  2. mossym

    mossym
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    if planning any sort of video streaming or centralized storage of video for distribution to different rooms then go wired. I've never gotten wireless working right for hd video, and have never had a problem with wired. if at the stage where running cable is easy then no question go for it, don't rely on doing things wireless later.

    for a house cat5e is more than enough, you'll get gigabit speeds on cat5e for the distances a house would require. should save you a few quid as well
     
  3. mossym

    mossym
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    oh. and for what other gear...bring all your cat cables back to one location. make sure you also bring a connection to your main phone line here. if planning broadband from tv servies run a couple of cat cables to where your main tv point will be(i'd run two to everywhere, and a few to your main tv point)

    then get a 24 port gigabit switch. if getting dsl the provided modem/router will get connected to your phoneline. one of the network outputs from your router is then connected to the switch and you then have internet access all over the house.
     
  4. mossym

    mossym
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    oh, and one last thing, hoem automation is another route you may want to go down(control over lights/blinds/heating). if you do, then now is definitely the time to look at that..do NOT rely on wireless for that
     
  5. Lance2000

    Lance2000
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    So my best plan is to run 2x CAT5 cables from each area back to a 24 port switch (Possibly more cables back to main TV point).
    24 port switch to be located at same location as phone line / cable.

    Is there any way I would be able to store all AV equipment (Sky, HiFi, Computer etc..) in one room (Computer room) and have the benefits of equipment in another room (Living room)?.

    Like the sound of home automation….. Is this costly? Hard to install? Easy to control?

    Thanks!!
     
  6. mossym

    mossym
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    would go cat5e..not cat5...but yeah..and the 24 ports is all dependent on how many you need, you may only need 16, or may need more...

    how far apart are they? you could route everything to a av receiver and have one hdmi going to your living room, but that depends on distance...


    the answer to all 3 is that it can be. it requires a good bit of planning and the control systems can be quite expensive dependent on the level of control you want

    one website i found useful to see some of the gear that was out there is

    Let's Automate. Home Automation, X10 Home Automation, Automation, intelligent Automation, Philips Pronto, CBUS Home Automation, Home Control, Intelligent Home, Intelligent House, Thinking House, Philips Pronto Touch Screen Remote Control, RU890, RU94

    they are not forum sponsors, so apologies if i offend any advertisers. i have no affiliation with them, apart from having bought of them before with no problems
     
  7. Lance2000

    Lance2000
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    Distance between rooms is aprox 25m (cable run).

    Would an AV receiver alow me to control all items? (i.e Sky, Gaming PC Keyboard mouse, Xbox, etc..)

    And would i just need 1 HDMI cable or one for each item?
     
  8. mossym

    mossym
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    @25m forget about it. a receiver won't control the keyboard and mouse, and bluetooth or wirless kb/mouse won't work at that distance. not sure on teh range of the xbox controllers either.

    sending the audio and video that distance isn't hard, it's the input devices for things like pc's and games consoles that get difficult
     
  9. Kristian

    Kristian
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    You only need a switch that has enough ports to accommodate the number of wired network devices you have, not the number of cables you have. E.g. if you have 5 devices (say 2x PCs, 1x router, 1x NAS and BT Vision) you could get away with a 5 port switch; an 8 port would leave you with some growing room.

    The problem with this minimal approach is that each time you move a device to a new location you would need to move the patch cable from the switch in your central place from one socket to another. If you have a switch that has the same or more ports as you have cables then this isn't a problem but it costs more.

    You could compromise and get an 8 or 12 port rather than a 24 port. It's easy to swap switches out to upgrade or add another later to increase the number of ports.

    Depends on how much spare cash you have...

    Cables should be Cat5E, no need for Cat6 IMHO.

    Switch doesn't need to be at the same place as you master phone socket. You could run a dedicated extension from the master socket to your comms cupboard (You could even use the Cat5E cable) - just wire only wires 2&5, no need for the others. This is assuming xDSL and not cable BB.

    While you are running a new phone cable you could put a filtered face plate on the master socket which will remove the need to have microfilters all over the place and possibly increase the speed of the BB connection.

    wired > wireless imho. It's more stable and quicker than wireless. Downside is you need a patch lead hanging out the back of the device which isn't always the best with a laptop.

    Kris.
     
  10. mossym

    mossym
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    aye, no need for them to be at the same place. as i said above just make sure there is a connection from your main phone line, it doesn't ahve to be the main phone line itself
     
  11. Pengbo

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    Generally if you are wiring up a house and hiding the cables in walls, floors etc... then you should be using solid core cable. It's not a good idea to crimp rj45 plugs directly on the solid core cable (you can do it but have to fit special rj45 plugs) as the constant movement can cause stress fractures and eventually breakages in the cables.

    It's always better to terminate them property in a patch panel and then use patch leads to go from the patch panel to your switch, even if it's only 6 to 9 inches away. That way you can terminate as many cables as you want to and then as has already been said just use a switch as big as you need to connect up the relevant ports on the patch panel.
     
  12. mossym

    mossym
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    i never gotthis for a home installation. why does a patch panel help? why not just connect them directly to the switch? unless you have rooms that you want to connect/disconnect all the time hooking them directly to the switch is a lot simpler and tidier solution
     
  13. Kristian

    Kristian
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    Because of the info in Pengbo's post above. Solid cable is not good for plugs. It's also easier to terminate onto sockets rather than plugs. I'd also say terminating onto plugs isn't the tider solution.

    You don't need a dedicated patch panel either. You can use some backboxes and sockets to make your own 'patch panel'.

    Kris.
     
  14. Pengbo

    Pengbo
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    Solid cable is really designed to be for fixed installations. If you constantly move solid cable it will eventually break and you then have a total nightmare with a cable into a wall that you can't use.

    I know that you will say you would plug them in once and never touch them again. It will never happen. they will get joggled and moved and pushed and prodded, you have to dust some time. You lift the switch to dust it will move the wires. Eventually a stress fracture in the solid copper wire will occur and it is just time until it is unusable then. Plus with solid cable you can terminate it with something like this 12 Port Patch Panel you can make a very neat solution for every cable and then use them as and when you need to instead of having say 4 cables in use to the switch and another 6 or 8 wrapped up in the corner waiting to be used.

    If you want to do it with trailing wires out of a wall or floor (I agree with KrisLee it's much untidier that way) then it would be better using stranded CAT5e cable used in patch leads. It's quite a bit more expensive though.
     

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