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High-light conditions

Discussion in 'Camcorders, Action Cams & Video Editing Forum' started by irishboarder, Mar 4, 2005.

  1. irishboarder

    irishboarder
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    hey guys, i was wondering could you help me, I am intereseted in filming on snow

    The last time I took my JVC DVL-150 out in the snow all i got was white out on the recording, just some vague shadows where the people...

    Now I have filmed in the snow before, and it recorded perfectly, but this would have been at a leter time in the day...

    All I want is to record adequately enought to see whats going on! I set the shutter speed as fast as I could, even set it to snow mode, but no good...

    Do I need to buy a filter or am I just doing the settings wrong?
     
  2. Roy Mallard

    Roy Mallard
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    auto exposure systems work on the assumption that a correct exposure is 15% grey (roughly the same tone as grass or caucasian skin tone) so bright subjects like snow mean that the camera will try to make them a bt darker (thus your subjects going dark), dark subjects make the camera want to go brighter (thus the noisy-grainy- images you get indoors).

    For outside in bright light take control of the exposure manually, also a polariser is always a great idea for bright sun, an ND filter is a good idea anyway outdoors.

    Shoot side on to the sun (if you shoot with the sun behind you then you'll cast a shadow over overything and your subjects will squint their eyes, if you shoot with the sun in front of you then all you get is burnout and sillouette) try to avoid shooting at midday or peak sun.

    For ski-ing you probably want a shutter of 1/500th and 1/125th, obviously 1/125th will let in more light so be prepared to stop down (smaller f number) however on some video cameras if you go below f8 the image blurs because of the circle of confusion envloping the tiny ccd, if this is too technical stick to the previous paragraphs and you'll be alright,
     

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