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Question Hi Gloss Black Speakers

Danhifi

Active Member
My Bowers and Wilkins CM 1 S2 speakers have developed a film on them. How to I remove it? I have attached a picture of what I am seeing.
 
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Jamie

Distinguished Member
I can't access any of the pictures. Can you upload them here.
 

Danhifi

Active Member
Here are the pics
 

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It looks more like something has rubbed against it to me, so more of a scuff?

If you swipe your finger across it, does it leave a trail in that direction?
 

Danhifi

Active Member
No trail. It only shows up in direct sunlight. I have wiped it with a microfiber cloth and a small amount of water and it does not wipe off and as you look at it at different angles you can see the "wave" of the film on the speaker. I agree it looks like a scuff in the picture, but it is like a film/grime/haze, that won't come off. Like when you clean a window in direct sunlight and you have that haze on it.
 

thewhofan

Active Member
I own the Kef KHT3005 5.1 speakers which are gloss black and had a similar problem with a film that built up over the years even though I dust them with a dry microfibre cloth. I damp microfibre didn't work.
I ended up buying guitar polish of all things as my sister owned a Fender Strat and the finish of that looked the same as my speakers only different colour.
I tested it on a small area and the hazy layer came straight off and looked like new. So I did the whole speaker and it worked perfectly. The polish also adds a protective film that helps to keep the surface clean.
I couldn't say for sure if the surface finish of your speakers is the same as mine but it worked for me.
This is what I used. Gibson Pump Polish And Standard Polish Cloth Combo at Gear4music
 

Jamie

Distinguished Member
Autoglym Super Resin Polish would also be my choice.

The hazing effect is actually tiny micro scratches, probably caused by wiping them down. The polish essentially fills in these tiny scratches so they don't interfere with reflections any more.

It's interesting that specialist guitar polish is mentioned, my mates a bit of a guitar collector (well into double figures last time I saw his collection and that was a year ago) and he swears by Autoglym SRP for all of his guitars. For the ones that stay on display in his lounge he also adds some Autoglym Deep shine after the polish and they properly pop.
 
SRP would be ok, but use a soft applicator like a foam one and don’t dig your fingertips into it and you could mark the paint further.

Any automotive paint cleanser with fillers in should be fine. The marks may reappear over time.

The permanently remove them you would need to machine polish the area
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
Though they are hard to find, they make Car Polish in Colors. So if you have a Red Car you get Red Polish, and if you have Black Speakers ...in this case... you get Black Polish.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Turtle-Wax-52708-Paintwork-Scratches/dp/B06Y6MDFJZ/

The idea behind Color Wax/Polish is that the Black Wax will fill in any whirls on the finish and they will show much less.

I notice that the GIBSON is a spray polish, they make this for cars too. Very thin, very light, but leaves a very nice shine. Perhaps not as durable as rub on polish, but to keep the gloss, they work well. No need to let them dry to a haze like most polish, just spray on and wipe off.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Meguiars-G17516EU-Ultimate-Spray-450ml/dp/B002KKCLP0/

Perhaps cleaning them once with a Car Polish, then after that periodic treatments with the Spray and Wipe Wax/Polish/Shine.

Steve/bluewizard
 
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lotsatoys

Active Member
I use a clean damp,emphasis on clean, microfibre cloth to gently lift the dust off of my R100's and then polish with quality car wax by Bilt and Hamber using another clean microfibre cloth.
If your speakers have swirl marks I would use a polish first to carefully remove those before applying the wax.
My speakers look better than new!
 

MaryWhitehouse

Well-known Member
Autoglym Super Resin Polish would also be my choice.

The hazing effect is actually tiny micro scratches, probably caused by wiping them down. The polish essentially fills in these tiny scratches so they don't interfere with reflections any more.

It's interesting that specialist guitar polish is mentioned, my mates a bit of a guitar collector (well into double figures last time I saw his collection and that was a year ago) and he swears by Autoglym SRP for all of his guitars. For the ones that stay on display in his lounge he also adds some Autoglym Deep shine after the polish and they properly pop.

Then some gloss protector after that. Helps with static too.
 

Danhifi

Active Member
Autoglym Super Resin Polish. I have since upgraded to CM8 S2's. I use the Super Resin on them too. I live in Israel and it is extremely dusty and I dust the speakers a ton with the micro fiber cloth that comes with the Autoglym kit. The polish seems to really deepen the black in the speakers and does a nice job of masking the surface scratches. From my experience the speakers come scratched from the factory. You really have to look hard and in direct light to see the small surface scratches. Happy to answer any other questions.
 

Paul7777x

Distinguished Member
If you really want to do a serious job, and protect them from uv and scratches, I’d suggest a machine polish, a polish remover, then a gentle, but thorough cleaning with an good alcohol solution then two coats of wax.

A machine polish can be done very well with a variable rate battery drill.

Just be careful and slow.

Polish remover is done by hand and needs to be done quite quickly, once the polish is all gone, the alcohol makes sure and leaves a perfectly clean surface for the wax to adhere to.

I always use AutoGlym as mentioned above. The wax is expensive, but done properly it lasts about three months in the winter on a car.

On speakers in a house it will effectively last years.

Worth doing one afternoon. The results are fantastic.
 

LAMitchell

Active Member
Piano black is notorious for marring, also some of the solvents in the painting process can rise to the surface. The way in which speakers are painted is similar to that of the motor industry so I would suggest a fine car polish and then wax. I have had to restore a number of speakers for clients which has developed as a sideline for my business as a detailer and the above is the simplest way. Super resin is the easiest option just mask off any trim before you start.
 

Onlythesound

Well-known Member
We use E-cloths which can be found on Amazon. Wonderful for glass, gloss and other shiny surfaces. Simply dampen a clean microfibre and wipe the surface with it. Don’t over dampen it. Then shine the surface gently with the e-cloth. It really works well. I think they’re about £4 - £5 each.
 

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