Help - Yamaha Receiver Turns off on Loud Volume

Osumme007

Novice Member
Hi Team,

My Yamaha RX-V2077 AV Receiver turns off when I play loud volume.

I have a 5.2.4 Set up as follows:

AV Receiver - Yamaha Rx-V2077
Front (2) Right and Left Speakers - Yamaha NS- F160, Impedance 6 Ohms (50 -300 Watts)
Center Speaker (1) - Yamaha NS-C160, Impedance 6 Ohms (30-80 Watts)
Surround Back (2)- Yamaha NS-E55 , Impedance 6 Ohms impedance (150 Watts)
Ceiling Front and Back Presence (4) - Yamaha NS-IC800 Impedance 8 Ohms, (140 Watts)
Sub-woofers (2) - Yamaha YST-RSW300, (80Watts)

I am using Shield Pro and Sony UBP-X700 for the media input.
Projector Epson EB-U32

When ever I am playing the loud volume, the receiver shuts off. I can start gain and play it and it works on low to Medium volume. Also, when I play Midway Movie on Amazon Prime and during a fight scene (where lots of loud gun, plane and blast sounds) I start smelling something burning , not sure if its the Receiver/ Subs or Front Speakers. It happened twice. I have since added two fans on top of the receiver to vent out the heat but no success.

Any idea guys, how can troubleshoot and find whats causing the fault ???

Thank you in advance for the help and you time.

 
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John7

Well-known Member
it sounds like the receivers over-current/thermal shutdown is triggering to protect the amplifiers.

How are your 2 x centre speakers connected to the receiver? If they are in paralell, the impedance presented to the receiver will only be 3 ohms or less and this may be one of the issues. If so, try connecting them in series

Have you set the global speaker impedance to 6 Ohms in the settings menu (page 22 of the user manual)? The default setting is 8 Ohms.

Is the receiver positioned so that it has ample space around it to allow decent air flow for cooling? If it is in a cabinet with little space around it, air circulation may be reduced, causing it to overheat when pushed hard.
 
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Osumme007

Novice Member
it sounds like the receivers over-current protection is triggering to protect the amplifiers.

How are your 2 x centre speakers connected to the receiver. If they are in paralell, the impedance presented to the receiver will only be 3 ohms or less and this may be one of the issues.

Have you set the speaker impedance to 6 Ohms in the settings menu (page 22 of the user manual)? The default setting is 8 Ohms.

Is the receiver positioned so that it has ample space around it to allow decent air flow for cooling? If it is in a cabinet with little space around it, air circulation may be reduced, causing it to overheat when pushed hard.
Hi John,

Thank you for your reply. Apologies, that was a typo, I am using only 1 center speaker (Yamaha NS-C160).

Yes, the receiver is set to 6 Ohms Impedance so that should not be an issue I believe.
 

Osumme007

Novice Member
Just updated my comments....
Thanks, John,

The air flow is Ok, I wont call it great but there is airflow from back and front and about 3 inches on top. Please see the pic below:
1629092011519.png
 

John7

Well-known Member
Hmmm....

I think your centre speaker may be the culprit - it is the only speaker rated at under 100 Watts and may be causing the amp to trip. I would test this by disconnecting the speaker and setting the receiver to use phantom centre only (change the speaker settings to no centre speaker) and try the system out like that.

The voice coil,of your speaker may already be damaged (“cooked”) so will probably need replacing anyway.

Although the receiver can run really loud, bear in mind that prolonged use at high volumes will stress it and cause heat build up and distortion which can damage speakers. If you really need to run the system at loud volumes, maybe consider getting some additional power amps for the main speakers to take some of the load off the receiver’s amps and power supply.
 

Osumme007

Novice Member
Hmmm....

I think your centre speaker may be the culprit - it is the only speaker rated at under 100 Watts and may be causing the amp to trip. I would test this by disconnecting the speaker and setting the receiver to use phantom centre only (change the speaker settings to no centre speaker) and try the system out like that.

The voice coil,of your speaker may already be damaged (“cooked”) so will probably need replacing anyway.

Although the receiver can run really loud, bear in mind that prolonged use at high volumes will stress it and cause heat build up and distortion which can damage speakers. If you really need to run the system at loud volumes, maybe consider getting some additional power amps for the main speakers to take some of the load off the receiver’s amps and power supply.
Thanks again, John,

Sure, I will test without center speaker.

Also, I might start saving a little as I do enjoy the loud sound so getting an amp seems the way.

I will update the results after some testing but appreciate your help so far :)
 

Kapkirk

Active Member
You should not be smelling any burning, that is a sure sign something is getting very hot which is the reason the amp is going into protection.
 

John7

Well-known Member
Ah, seems I found it - the "6 Ohm" mode reduces power to the speakers, limiting performance (something to do with meeting some EU power regulation).
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
The impedance switch simply reduces the rail voltage and as such you'd basically br starving the speakers of power. It is recommended that you don't set the switch to anything other than its default 8ohm setting regardless of the rated nominal imedance of the speakers being used.

If the AV receiver is going into protection mode then don't turn the volume up as high as you;ve been doing. Either this or go invest in a more powerful AV receiver or external power amps.

By the way, the wattage rating on speakers is an indacation of what they can handle before you potentially cause them famage and would have no impact upon the AV receiver itself. The factors that influence the amplification and the effort required or the sensitivity and the impedance ratings. The lower the sensitivity then the harder the speakers will need to be driven in order to reach reference relative to your seated location.

The AV receiver in question is realatively powerful so this indicates that either the speakers are very difficult to drive or that the volume levels are excessively high? There's also the distance the speakers are from the listener to factor into this equation?
 
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rccarguy2

Well-known Member
If that switch doesn't sort it you could look at a Poweramp

I can't find tests of your amp but the 2070 is 40w per channel with 7 channels driven.

 

Osumme007

Novice Member
Thank you, everyone.

I will change the impedance to 8 Ohms and will run few tests. The sound is very loud for average user tbh but it happens when I do demo to friends. I will probably invest in an external amp If testing concludes its the power issue.

Appreciate the help members!!
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
The loudest you'd ever really need to go would be 0db using the relative to reference master volume scale. This aproximates the same level used by the sound engineers mixing film soundtracks and is what cinemas would have their volume set to. Not much higher than this is recognised as being a level that can cause hearing damage.

How often do you go to a movie theatre and ask them to turn the volume up? :)
 

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